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Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium

Memphis, TN

Home of the Memphis Tigers

4.3

3.6

Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium (map it)
335 S Hollywood St
Memphis, TN 38104


Memphis Tigers website

Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium website

Year Opened: 1965

Capacity: 56,862

There are no tickets available at this time.

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Roar of the Tiger

Opened in 1965, Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium is home to the Memphis Tigers football team, as well as the annual NCAA football Liberty Bowl, and currently has a capacity of 56,862. The facility is a true bowl design, with an oval-shaped grandstand that rises to a peak in the middle of each sideline, and descends to have valleys behind each end zone. The sight lines here are truly outstanding, meaning all seats have a great view of the action, due to the fact that the grandstand is really close to the field, but also because the seats are very steep, so all of the seats are closer to the action than at comparably-sized stadiums.

4.3

What is FANFARE?

The FANFARE scale is our metric device for rating each stadium experience. It covers the following:

  • Food & Beverage
  • Atmosphere
  • Neighborhood
  • Fans
  • Access
  • Return on Investment
  • Extras

Each area is rated from 0 to 5 stars with 5 being the best. The overall composite score is the "FANFARE Score".

Food & Beverage    4

Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium has a good variety of food and beverage options available at its concessions stands, including a couple varieties of beer.

The stadium is located in Memphis, so the obvious highlight here in terms of concessions is the barbecue from local favorite Hog Wild BBQ. The Hog Wild stand offers barbecue nachos and barbecue sandwiches, as well as cheese nachos and potato salad. Food choices at other stands include sub sandwiches with several different types of meat, regular and foot-long corn dogs, turkey legs, Polish sausage, burgers, pizza, fried bologna sandwiches, deluxe nachos, and barbecue chicken sandwiches. You can also find snack and dessert options such as chips, cookies, boxed candy, and funnel cake.

Food items range in cost from $2 for cookies, chips, and boxed candy, $4-$9 for funnel cake and most main dishes, $12 for turkey legs and deluxe nachos, and all the way up to $30 for a whole pizza. Note that each of the concessions stands offers different items, so you may need to walk around a bit if you are looking for a specific thing.

Drink offerings at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium include bottled water, Coke products in bottles, iced coffee, lemonade, sweet tea, and a couple varieties of beer. All drinks are $4, except beer, which is $8, but there is a stand near section 104 that offers $4 beers if you buy before kickoff. You can find the same drink options all over the stadium, and there is even a bar inside called Café at the 50.

Atmosphere    4

Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium is a fun place to watch a game, and offers a couple of cool features that make the experience unique.

The absolute best thing about seeing a game here is the live tiger that serves as one of the mascots. During the Tiger Walk, when the suit-and-tie clad players and coaches walk into the stadium before the game, TOM the tiger is with them, but you can also see him right before kickoff, pacing his cage as he is driven around the field. His cage is parked right behind one of the end zones throughout the game, so you can also catch glimpses of him while watching the action. See Tom being driven around the field here:

Besides TOM, the staff does a couple other interesting things to enhance the experience, the first a FedEx plane flying over before the game. You may have seen flyovers at other stadiums, but here at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium, the plane circles the venue a couple of times, so you can actually get a really good view of it (FedEx is one of the Tigers' sponsors). You also get to see fireworks after every Memphis touchdown (and after a win), and you will probably even hear real locomotives going by during the game, thanks to the actual railroad line right outside the stadium; you can see the tracks from the nosebleed seats.

Besides the live tiger and other great features, Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium also has a cool design, with graceful curves that rise or fall depending on which side you are standing on, plus a huge fountain outside the main entrance. And the stadium looks even better at night, when both the fountain and the pillars surrounding the grandstand are lit up in blue.

Once you get inside the stadium, you will see some really cool end zones, with black and blue tiger-striping serving as the backdrop for the team names painted there. There are also several giant tarps above one of the end zones, with that same tiger-striping plus the school logo, and most of the seats are painted in the team's colors; the bulk of the seats are aluminum bleachers, but there are bucket-style chair backs in the 15-20 lowest rows along each sideline.

Neighborhood    5

Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium is in a great location if you want to come for the day or weekend. Located about 5 miles east of downtown Memphis, the stadium is an easy drive from lots of popular attractions, such as Beale Street or the National Civil Rights Museum (the Lorraine Motel where Dr. Martin Luther King was killed). If you happen to be an Elvis fan, Sun Studio is also downtown, and Graceland isn't much further; you can also drive about an hour and a half south to Tupelo to see his birthplace.

There are plenty of great restaurants near downtown, especially on Beale Street, including Hard Rock Café and Hooters; many of the restaurants on Beale Street feature live music. However, if you are looking for something closer to the stadium, you might try Central BBQ or Celtic Crossing Irish Pub. Central BBQ offers Memphis-style smoked meats, and is a good option if you are looking for some local flavors, while Celtic Crossing features traditional Irish fare, and is a great spot for drinks and dancing.

Most of the hotels in the Memphis area are near downtown or along the I-40/I-240 beltline; the closest ones to Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium are Best Western and Courtyard, the latter which is near the airport.

Fans    4

Fans at Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium are loud and loyal; at a typical game the stadium will be at least two-thirds full, and during special events like white-out games, nearly all fans wear the right gear for the occasion. You will hear lots of cheering during the game, and loud booing at bad calls, and most fans wear team gear. And as at most big-time sporting events, you will even see fans with chests painted in support of their team.

Access    4

Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium is located near the center of the I-40/I-240 beltline, so you have to drive through town a little to get here, since the stadium is not right off the freeway. However, there is plenty of parking on the north and west sides for $15, so you shouldn't have to walk very far (parking on the east side is harder to come by). There are also gates all the way around the venue, so you can get in on any side; note that will call is at Gate 1.

Once you get inside the stadium, moving around is easy, and there are plenty of bathrooms. There are ramps into the stands all around the concourse, and there is also a walkway that fully circles the lower bowl, so you can get to your seat easily no matter which side you enter on.

Return on Investment    5

Tickets to Memphis football games start at $15, which is already on the low end for major college football, but you can also buy them from scalpers outside the stadium for as little as $5, which is a steal for the experience. Concessions are very reasonable since there are several low-cost options, and parking is certainly fair for a venue of this size.

Extras    4

Being able to see a live tiger is definitely a plus, and one of the main reasons you should plan a trip to Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium. Also, seeing a jumbo jet not only fly over, but actually circle the stadium is really cool, and very unique, as is being able to hear real locomotives roll by during the game. You also can't beat Memphis as a tourist destination.

Final Thoughts

Football teams in the American Athletic Conference often get overlooked, since they aren't in the more prestigious Group of 5. However, passing on these schools means you will miss out on some really great college football venues like this one. So, if you are planning to be in the Memphis area anytime soon, look into visiting Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium; seeing a game here will definitely be worth your while.

Sorry Charlie

But your all wet. The ole lady is in great physical shape and with the planned upgrades the ole lady will look even better. She will be hosting Tiger game 10, 20 and maybe even 30 years down the road. The only ones clamoring for an OCS are a small minority who hang out on the local message board and feel inferior if another school has a new toy they do not have. The Tigers have such a great financial agreement with the city on rent of the stadium it would be impossible to match it with an OCS.

by mphsrick43 | Oct 07, 2012 10:44 PM

@mphsrick43

Everyone is entitled to his own opinion. As I pointed out in my review, the lack of club seating is a crucial reason to desire a different venue. Additionally, there is no reason for a 60,000+ seat stadium right now, it just makes the small crowds look worse. Being a native Memphian, I'm very well aware of the deal the U of M has on LBMS, and it's not quite as sweet as you paint it to be. It's actually a pain, having to stop and get Board approval before doing anything of substance to the building. So you have your predictions and I have mine. Only time will tell which is more accurate. Whether the new venue is on-campus or off, I stand behind my prediction that the Liberty Bowl's days are numbered. It's #1 proponent, Dr. Shirley Raines, will be gone in less than 2 years and we'll see what the incoming University President wants to do.

by leroywatsonjr | Oct 23, 2012 01:00 AM

Fabulous Place for a Big Game!

Just home from stadium #82, where we saw the Tigers win their biggest game ever(?). The Liberty Bowl was packed; not an empty seat in the house! Beating a ranked team (Ole Miss) helps.

Food was okay; free street parking was okay to come by, but was very slow at get away! Sell outs will do that........

We loved the Liberty Bowl. It just felt like football. Crowd was in it from the start, and there were lots of visiting fans too. Noisy, fun game. Long drive home if you were an Ole Miss fan.

by stevevanb@cogeco.ca | Oct 20, 2015 09:53 AM

Time for an update...

With the recent success of the program, crowds have been much larger, and given the Tigers a nice home field advantage and atmosphere. Also, the capacity of the stadium has been reduced, and will be further reduced to about 57k with the installment of 8k new box seats.
Most everything in this stadium has been renovated, from luxury boxes to bathrooms, video boards to locker rooms, concessions to meeting areas, and surrounding tailgating areas, landscaping, and entrances. Further improvement to the press box is planned.
LBMS is a fantastic place to watch a football game.

by OnToVictory | Jan 10, 2016 01:27 PM

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Crowd Reviews

Give Me Liberty

Total Score: 3.29

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 0
  • Access: 2
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

The year was 1965. The Beatles had taken America by storm just one year prior, Lyndon Baines Johnson was in his final year as U.S. President, leaded gasoline cost $0.31 a gallon and the United States began bombing runs against the Viet Cong as our country's role in the Vietnam War grew rapidly.

It's also the year that the City of Memphis made a $3.7 million investment in their future by opening Memphis Memorial Stadium, the anchor and crown jewel of the Mid-South Fairgrounds complex, which also included the American Legion baseball stadium and the Mid-South Coliseum (each opened for business in 1963). American Legion Field, which seated 8,800 and would later be re-named Blues Stadium before finally being christened Tim McCarver Stadium, the Coliseum and Memorial Stadium were all within walking distance of one another and were erected on the East side of Early Maxwell Boulevard. Libertyland amusement park and the Mid-South Fairgrounds occupied the land to the West of Early Maxwell, with the exception of the livestock stables, which crossed over both sides of Early Maxwell between the football and baseball stadiums.

Memorial Stadium was built primarily to lure the Liberty Bowl football game to the city of Memphis. The bowl game had drawn very poorly in its original home of Philadelphia, PA, and even worse in its one year in Atlantic City, NJ. It was an instant smash success in Memphis, so much so that the football stadium was re-named Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium in 1976.

The Liberty Bowl, now known as the AutoZone Liberty Bowl, remains a major tenant of the facility to this day. The wildly popular Southern Heritage Classic football game, pitting prominent Historically Black Colleges and Universities Tennessee State and Jackson State, has been contested in the stadium since 1989. The Classic has become the largest annual sporting event in the city of Memphis.

The University of Memphis football team, however, is the most regular tenant of the Liberty Bowl, with their annual spring Blue-Gray game as well as their home football games every fall.

Over the years, the venerable Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium has held many noteworthy games. Perhaps the best known in many circles was the 1982 Liberty Bowl, won by the Alabama Crimson Tide, 21-15, over Illinois. Less than a month later, legendary Alabama head coach Bear Bryant passed away after a heart attack, making that '82 Liberty Bowl both his final game and victory.

The venue has also hosted some very notable non-football related events, as well. On July 4, 1975, the Rolling Stones performed in concert at the stadium with about 51,000 people in attendance. Among the opening acts were the Charlie Daniels Band and the J. Geils Band. The event was infamous for running out of concessions and ice in 95-degree weather, with stadium personnel turning on water hoses to let patrons spray each other in a bid to cool off. The playing surface, after being trampled by some 12,000 screaming fans on the field, was an utter quagmire that took days to repair.

The Monsters of Rock tour took Memphis by storm on July 8-9, 1988. It was one of the largest, loudest tour events in the world up to that time, and part of the first-ever traveling concert series of its kind in U.S. history. The tour was headlined by international superstars Van Halen and supported by such stellar acts as Metallica, Scorpions and Dokken. And once again, fire hoses were brought in to cool off the fans, sweltering in temperatures hovering between 95- and 100-degrees. It was estimated that peak attendance was around 45,000-50,000 for Van Halen.

The stadium truly is a "bowl" and was the first in the U.S. to be built with two high concourses that swept down to two lower concourses, but all in a single tier. It was built with the East side, along Hollywood Street, lower than the seating on the West side. This set initial capacity at 50,160. In 1984, Coca-Cola Bottling sponsored the installation of what was then the largest scoreboard in the Mid-South, a 100-foot wide by 23-foot tall unit. The first (and likely only) major renovation to the venue came in 1987 and cost $19.5 million. It balanced the height of each side, swelled peak attendance to 62,370, affixed luxury boxes to the top of the East concourse, and saw improvements to the concessions, lighting, playing surface, restrooms and handicap seating. This was followed by a 1999 re-working that took capacity to an all-time high of 62,921. Various minor alterations were made to increase the comfort level of attendees over the next decade or so and now the listed capacity is 61,008. And a new FieldTurf playing surface was installed in 2005 at a cost of $850,000.

Bounds & Gillespie Architects handled plans for the 1987 and 1999 renovations.

In December 1983, the city of Memphis honored the memory of fallen head coach Rex Dockery, who was killed in a plane crash on December 12th of that year. The playing surface at the Liberty Bowl was re-named Rex Dockery Field.

Deliberations over the long-term future of the Liberty Bowl have raged for years. In 2010, it was decided that the grounds around the facility would be upgraded, and $15.7 million in capital improvements were approved by the City Council. The largest chunk of that budget was devoted to creating Tiger Lane—a spectacular tailgating area—along with a new grand West entrance. Tiger Lane was christened by the world-renowned Memphis in May Barbecue Contest in the Spring of 2011, thanks to the submersion of downtown Tom Lee Park under flood waters. The official opening of Tiger Lane, however, occurred on September 18, 2011 at a home game versus Middle Tennessee State.

The old stadium has aged well, but a nearly 50-year old stadium is at an inherent disadvantage when being compared to more modern venues. One glaring problem is the lack of club seats, which are typically sandwiched between the upper and lower concourses of modern stadiums. It is the sort of revenue-killer that led the city of Memphis to shut down the Pyramid Arena and open the FedEx Forum in 2004. There are only scattered seat backs in the building. The risers leading to the upper seats are relatively steep. And it would cost untold millions to retro-fit the Liberty Bowl, more than it would cost to build a brand new venue from scratch.

Give Me Liberty

Total Score: 3.86

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

The Liberty Bowl was built almost 50 years ago, in 1965. The name derives from the fact that the stadium was “built by the citizens of Memphis” as a memorial to the veterans of World War I, World War II and the Korean War. Built for $3.7 million, Memphis Memorial Stadium, as it was originally named, became the anchor and crown jewel of the Mid-South Fairgrounds complex, which also included the American Legion baseball stadium and the Mid-South Coliseum, each opening for business in 1963.

American Legion Field—which seated 8,800 and would later be re-named Blues Stadium before finally being christened Tim McCarver Stadium. The Coliseum and Memorial Stadium were all within easy walking distance of one another and were erected on the East side of Early Maxwell Boulevard. Libertyland Amusement Park and the Mid-South Fairgrounds occupied the land to the West of Early Maxwell, with the exception of the livestock stables, which crossed over both sides of Early Maxwell, just between the football and baseball stadiums.

Memorial Stadium was built primarily to lure the Liberty Bowl football game to the city of Memphis.

Founded by Ambrose F. “Bud” Dudley in 1959, the bowl game had drawn very poorly in its original home of Philadelphia, PA. Contested in Philly’s Municipal Stadium, it was the only cold weather postseason collegiate game at the time. Dudley ardently desired to see a bowl game played in Philadelphia, and the Liberty Bowl moniker was a natural nod to the city’s historic importance to the liberation of America. The inaugural event faired very well, as 36,211 fans packed in to see Penn State defeat Alabama, 7-0. Attendance dropped dramatically the following year to 16,624. By 1963, the game drew fewer than 10,000 spectators (8,309), absorbing a staggering $40,000+ deficit, which would translate to about $300,000+ today.

New Jersey lured the Liberty Bowl to the Boardwalk in 1964, dangling a guaranteed pay day of $25,000 to Dudley. It was moved to Atlantic City’s Convention Hall and became the first-ever bowl game played indoors. AstroTurf was a few years away, so they instead rolled a 2-inch thick base of burlap on the playing surface, topped by a 4-inch thick grass surface. Artificial lighting was installed and kept going around the clock to stimulate grass growth. The experiment cost the citizens of Atlantic City some $16,000.

The game was a dismal failure. It took the $25,000 guarantee, paid by local businessmen, to keep Dudley out of the red. Only 6,059 fans watched Utah dismantle West Virginia. Some shrewd Memphis visionaries, whose names appear to sadly have been lost from history, were watching these developments and pushing ahead with construction of Memphis Memorial Stadium. They nabbed the game for 1965.

The first Liberty Bowl played in Memphis occurred on December 16, 1965. A healthy crowd of 38,607 watched Ole Miss defeat Auburn, 13- 7. The nascent contest drew a then-record crowd of 39,101 in 1966 as Miami topped Virginia Tech, 14-7. The game has failed to crack 32,000 fans only once since then (21,097 in 1993).

Memphis Memorial Stadium became so synonymous with its signature event that the building was re-named Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium in 1976. The only other name change occurred in December of 1983, when city officials christened the playing surface Rex Dockery Field in honor of the late football coach who died tragically in an airplane accident over Lawrenceburg, TN on December 12, 1983. Also dying that day were assistant coach Chris Faros, Tiger freshman Charles Greenhill and prominent booster Glenn Jones.

The Liberty Bowl, now known as the AutoZone Liberty Bowl, remains a major tenant of the facility to this day. The wildly popular Southern Heritage Classic football game, pitting prominent Historically Black Colleges and Universities Tennessee State and Jackson State, has also been contested in the stadium since 1989.

Over the years, Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium has held many noteworthy events. Perhaps the best known in many circles was the 1982 Liberty Bowl, won by the Alabama Crimson Tide, 21-15, over Illinois on December 29, 1982. Less than a month later, legendary Alabama head coach Bear Bryant passed away after a heart attack, making that '82 Liberty Bowl both his final game and victory.

The Monsters of Rock tour took Memphis by storm on July 8-9, 1988. It was one of the largest, loudest tour events in the world up to that time, and part of the first-ever traveling concert series of its kind in U.S. history. The tour was headlined by international superstars Van Halen and supported by such stellar acts as Metallica, Scorpions and Dokken. Fire hoses were brought in to cool off the fans, sweltering in temperatures hovering between 95- and 100-degrees. It was estimated that peak attendance was around 45,000-50,000 for Van Halen.

The stadium truly is a “bowl” and was the first in the U.S. to be built with two high concourses that swept down to two lower concourses, but all in a single tier. It was built with the East side, along Hollywood Street, lower than the West side with an initial capacity of 50,160. In 1984, Coca-Cola Bottling sponsored the installation of what was then the largest scoreboard in the region, a 100-foot by 23-foot unit with a 16’ by 32’ display area.

A $19.5 million major renovation to the venue came in 1987. It balanced the height of each side, swelled peak attendance to 62,370, affixed luxury boxes to the top of the East concourse, and saw improvements to the concessions, lighting, playing surface, restrooms and handicap seating. This was followed by a 1999 re-working that took capacity to an all-time high of 62,921. Various minor alterations were made to increase the comfort level of attendees over the next decade or so and now the listed capacity is 61,008.

Bounds & Gillespie Architects handled plans for the 1987 and 1999 renovations.

Deliberations over the long-term future of the Liberty Bowl have raged for years. In 2010, it was decided that the grounds around the facility would be upgraded, and $15.7 million in capital improvements were approved by the City Council. The largest chunk of that budget was devoted to creating Tiger Lane—a spectacular tailgating area—along with a new grand West entrance, which is absolutely breathtaking at night.

The University of Memphis football team, as the most regular tenant of the Liberty Bowl with their annual spring Blue-Gray game as well as their home football games every fall, unveiled Tiger Lane at the world-renowned Memphis in May Barbecue Contest in the Spring of 2011, thanks to the submersion of downtown Tom Lee Park under flood waters. The official opening of Tiger Lane, however, occurred on September 18, 2011 at a home game versus Middle Tennessee State. Improvements continued into 2012, and many of these were aimed specifically at making the Liberty Bowl more inviting for their most frequent user, the Memphis Tigers. The exterior of the building was painted for the first time in the stadium’s history. A beautiful stadium club area for Tiger boosters and fans was built in the lower concourse. Modern AstroTurf was installed, as well.

The centerpiece of the latest round of renovations is the stunning video boards. With unsurpassed resolution and a powerful new sound system, the $2.5 million invested includes a 106’ by 58’ structure that hulks over the South end of the field and a 38’x10’ LED board nestled at the North end. The video board nearest the Tigers’ locker room is, according to available statistics, one of the 10 largest in the country. Future projects will include upgrading the 4-level press box. The plumbing and HVAC systems will be updated and Internet access will be improved. Other functional changes are scheduled to be made, as well, with the press box likely being expanded. The venerable old stadium has aged well, but a nearly 50-year old stadium is at an inherent disadvantage when being compared to more modern venues. One glaring problem is the lack of club seats, which are typically sandwiched between the upper and lower concourses of modern stadiums. This is a potent revenue-killer. The risers leading to the upper seats are relatively steep. And it would cost untold millions to retro-fit the Liberty Bowl, more than it would cost to build a brand new venue from scratch.

The Tigers Football???

Total Score: 3.00

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 2
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 4

The Liberty Bowl is a stadium that needs a good football team. It was built about fifty years ago and a team that has played in there hasn't gone over .600 EVER! The Tigers need to get a better football team so that the Liberty Bowl can make their facilities better inside the stadium. Recently they added tiger lane which is a place where you can tailgate and that would be your favorite part of the whole time. Hopefully, when the Tigers go to the Big East the team and the new coach can get a better team! FINGERS CROSSED

Fight, Fight For The Blue And Gray

Total Score: 3.86

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 3

Planning a trip to the Liberty Bowl for a Memphis Tigers football game? Be prepared for a great experience which extends beyond football. Not only will you have the opportunity to attend a game in a historic stadium, but you’ll also find yourself in an iconic city known for music, barbecue, and culture.

Constructed originally in 1965, Liberty Bowl Stadium was built as a memorial to World War I, World War II and the Korean War veterans. Though the stadium was originally built to attract the Liberty Bowl game to Memphis, it has also serves as a faithful off-campus home to Memphis Tiger football.

Must see with the Tigers winning

Total Score: 3.86

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

This can be a great stadium . I went this year for the Navy game and the atmosphere felt to me to be familiar to some SEC games I've attended . Tiger lane has become a true southern tailgate experience .

The stadium was full , or near full . Flyby of the Fedex plane was a pretty neat site . The fanbase has improved and grown a lot younger . I attended Memphis and was in the band . It was always heartbreaking to see such a good venue with potential wasted on 5k fans . Now the stadium fills for most games and can get very loud . I am very proud of my Tigers .

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Local Food & Drink

Central BBQ  (map it!)

2249 Central Ave

Memphis, TN 38104

(901) 272-9377

http://www.cbqmemphis.com/

Celtic Crossing Irish Pub  (map it!)

903 Cooper St

Memphis, TN 38104

(901) 274-5151

http://www.celticcrossingmemphis.com/

Local Entertainment

Beale Street  (map it!)

Beale Street

Memphis, TN 38103

http://www.bealestreet.com/

National Civil Rights Museum  (map it!)

450 Mulberry St

Memphis, TN 38103

(901) 521-9699

http://www.civilrightsmuseum.org/

Sun Studio  (map it!)

706 Union Avenue

Memphis, TN 38103

(901) 521-0664

https://www.sunstudio.com/

Graceland  (map it!)

Elvis Presley Blvd

Memphis, TN 38116

https://www.graceland.com/

Elvis Presley Birthplace & Museum  (map it!)

306 Elvis Presley Dr

Tupelo, MS 38804

(662) 841-1245

https://elvispresleybirthplace.com/

Children's Museum of Memphis  (map it!)

2525 Central Ave

Memphis, TN 38104

(901) 458-2678

http://cmom.com/

Pink Palace Museum and Planetarium  (map it!)

3050 Central Ave

Memphis, TN 38111

(901) 320-6320

http://www.memphismuseums.org/

Lodging

Best Western Plus Gen X Inn  (map it!)

1177 Madison Ave

Memphis, TN 38104

(901) 692-9136

https://www.bestwestern.com/content/best-western/en_US.html

Courtyard Memphis Airport  (map it!)

1780 Nonconnah Blvd

Memphis, TN 38132

(901) 396-3600

http://www.marriott.com/default.mi

Holiday Inn-University of Memphis  (map it!)

3700 Central Ave

Memphis, TN 38111

(901) 678-8200

http://www.holidayinn.com/hotels/us/en/memphis/memkw/hoteldetail

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