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Comerica Park

Detroit, MI

Home of the Detroit Tigers

4.3

3.9

Comerica Park (map it)
2100 Woodward Ave
Detroit, MI 48201


Detroit Tigers website

Comerica Park website

Year Opened: 2000

Capacity: 41,574

There are no tickets available at this time.

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Flourishing Feline Fandom

MLB's Detroit Tigers had their den at the corner of Michigan and Turnbull since the team's founding in 1901, and starting in 1912, that home was the eponymous Tiger Stadium. As it was one of the few grand old ballparks that survived the multi-use replacement slaughter of the 60s and 70s, diehard Tiger fans took the mid-nineties announcement of a new stadium with a certain amount of trepidation, perhaps more so when a local bank (Comerica) bought the naming rights of the previously corporate-free park.

They needn't have worried. While Comerica Bank may have since moved its headquarters to Texas, Comerica Park remains a Detroit mainstay since opening its doors with the new millennium in 2000. The 41,574-seat stadium has made its own place in Detroit's downtown and the hearts of the Detroit faithful. The team hasn't sat on its laurels, updating the park in recent years, renovating the scoreboard into a LED beast in 2012 and redesigning the Pepsi Porch area in 2015, adding the Bacardi 416 Bar, fire pit, and lounge seating and moving the bleachers up outside the LaBatt Jungle Bar.

Comerica Park may never quite have the gravitas and history of old Tiger Stadium, but it is a jewel of the current generation of parks, with a fantastic setting for fantastic fans in a city going through a slow Renaissance.

4.3

What is FANFARE?

The FANFARE scale is our metric device for rating each stadium experience. It covers the following:

  • Food & Beverage
  • Atmosphere
  • Neighborhood
  • Fans
  • Access
  • Return on Investment
  • Extras

Each area is rated from 0 to 5 stars with 5 being the best. The overall composite score is the "FANFARE Score".

Food & Beverage    4

As with most major league parks, the options at Comerica Park have long eclipsed Budweiser and a hot dog. While it may not have the nearly endless options found at some parks, it is above average in its offerings and has more than enough choices to keep you from getting bored.

You can't go five feet in Comerica without running into a food booth. There are several standard concessions (Big League Grills & Little Caesars Pizza) that cover the ballpark basics, and more specialty stands than you can shake a stick at. In addition to a tiger-themed carousel, the Big Cat Court is also a food court, with specialty burgers (313 Burger Co), hot dogs (Hot Dogs & Fries), desserts (Lemon & Ears, Hudsonville Ice Cream), Mexican, and specialties (Side Kicks -- grab a corn dog).

Fresh-grilled items are on offer at the picnic-area Detroit Brushfire Grill, as well as a surprising selection of vegetarian options. The Jungle delivers mostly BBQ on the top of the stadium, and the Pork Stand (home plate promenade) slings bacon-based specialties.

The Michigan Craft Beer stand has ballpark favorites out in right field in addition to suds. And as per MLB standard these days, there are also a number of restaurants and bars that are only available to specially ticketed patrons. A new Grab-n-Go stand in left field has both food and drink on the quick for those who want a convenience store experience right in the ballpark. Grab your stuff, pay, and go.

The drinks situation is similar to the food. There are selections available at the main concessions (generally Miller and Coors, plus several "Daiquiris" concessions), but there are also many specialty stands around the park. These range from a myriad of single beer or drink specialty carts (Miller, Leinenkugels, Labatt, Magic Hat, Blue Moon, Atwater Brewery, Smirnoff, Captain Morgan, Moonshine [yes, Moonshine]) to larger booze concessions, such as the New Amsterdam 416 Bar in the Upper Deck, Michigan Craft Beers (serving local crafts on the right field promenade) and the Beer Hall by home plate (which lives up to its name with over 35 selections).

I always believe in going native, so the Michigan Craft Beer is the stop to get any of the local suds. The Pork Stand can deliver Bacon and Eggs (large slab of bacon with deviled eggs) or Bacon-on-a-Stick. Grab a burger at Michigan Craft Beer if you're feeling less adventurous, or, for more danger in your cup, try a Moonshine Cocktail (first base promenade).

Atmosphere    5

Comerica Park is a superb place to watch a ballgame. It is one of the only parks in the majors to be a destination unto itself, and you can get your money's worth from your ticket just wandering around the tiger-centric architecture of the park and soaking it all in.

Once you cross through the tiger-guarded portals into the park, you can get the lay of the land. Separated into lower and upper levels, the seating circles the park on the lower level, and the upper level runs above the luxury and press boxes from left field around home plate and to right field. Seats get nicer the closer to the field you get, but all are comfortable. Bleacher seating is available in right field and by the Jungle Bar in the upper level. Ironically, the "receding wave" flow of the seats mean that the top rows of the upper deck and the lower deck rows under the overhangs are the only places guaranteed to be out of the sun or rain. The park faces downtown Detroit and is dominated in left field by the recent arrival of the giant LED scoreboard that keeps the fans up on the action. Monuments to players flank the ivy-covered Chevrolet Fountain in center field. The park feels both big and intimate, which is hard to pull off.

Tiger fans are serious about their baseball, but that doesn't mean they will forgo entertainment between innings. Though the festivities have been reduced thanks to pace-of-play rules, beloved mascot Paws still leads the activity between the on-field action. Big league standards of scoreboard-based entertainment and contests are interspersed with on-field antics, such as the (inevitable) car race, on-field performances, and Paws and others tossing giveaways to fans.

There are at least 22 seating options, almost evenly split between the lower and upper levels. There aren't many obvious sightline problems, though those with seats in left field will be the only ones in the park who can't see the enormous main scoreboard. Mezzanine tickets (upper level on the first base side) are probably your best cheap-seat option, though the Jungle Bleachers perched at the top of right field are an interesting perspective. While the pavilion seats in left deny you access to the scoreboard without turning around, you get a nice view overlooking both bullpens, also on the cheap. If you want to splurge, try the Tiger Den seats in the lower level, with oversized wooden beach chair seats and tiny tables.

Neighborhood    3

As one of the unofficial capitals of the Rust Belt, Detroit has been the butt of jokes for decades now, taking up the uncontested mantle as poster boy for urban disintegration and suburban flight in the popular mindset. And the title is not without its merits, as sad evidence of previous glory days can still be seen decaying where it stands and a couple of wrong turns can land you in areas of desolation that would not seem out of place in a war zone. But Detroit is not a uniform wasteland, and the city's slow rebirth has been centered on Comerica Park and its environs.

Detroit has plenty of options for eats near Comerica, starting with the Elwood Bar and Grill, a classic 1930's diner right next to the park. Keeping to downtown, local American favorites are Republic (American cuisine on Grand River Ave), Wright & Co (gastropub on Woodward), and Roast (steakhouse on Washington Boulevard).

Downtown ethnic flavor is on offer at Jacoby's German Biergarten (Brush Street), Vicente's Cuban (Library), and the Bucharest Grill (Park Ave). If you're willing to take a ride from downtown, the top-flight Giovanni's (Italian) is on Oakwood Boulevard southwest of downtown, and is widely talked about as one of the best restaurants in the city. To make it even easier to get some eats, some local establishments have postgame shuttles from the park, located at Park and Clifford.

No matter what your interests, you'll likely be able to find activities to suit you in Detroit. For sports fans, Ford Field is just next door, and Joe Louis Arena is on the opposite side of downtown.

For theater, concerts, and other events, the Fox Theater is also next door. The Opera House is in the area, and The Fillmore is a short walk southwest. Those with a cultural or historical bend will enjoy the Detroit Institute of Art, the Detroit Historical Society, the African American History Museum, and the Michigan Science Center, all clustered a short distance to the north of downtown.

Detroit is of course known as Motor City, and the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant will tell you about one auto maker's early history in the area. But Detroit is also home of Motown, and the Motown Museum is on Grand Boulevard to the northwest of downtown where you can learn about the R&B history of the city. And if you like to gamble, you can choose between the MGM Grand Detroit (downtown), the Greektown Casino (downtown), and the Motor City Casino Hotel (just north of downtown).

Downtown Detroit has a great deal of hotel options, from the lofty Detroit Marriott, MGM Grand, and Double Tree Hilton, down to the more reasonable Holiday Inn, Atheneum Suite Hotel, Courtyard Detroit, Crowne Plaza, Greektown Casino, and Motor City Casino. Cheaper options are found in another dozen or so hotels to the west in suburban Dearborn and southwest at Detroit Metro Airport. Those looking to treat themselves should check out the Inn at 97 Winder, an independent bed and breakfast in an opulent old Detroit mansion just a couple of blocks from the park.

Fans    5

The Tigers are one of the longest-lived franchises in the majors, so perhaps it only makes sense that they have one of the most fervent fan bases in the majors. And with this park to come to, it is not surprising they come out in droves.

While the Tigers have been a perennial contender for the AL Central in recent years, and even in a down year such as 2015, they managed to stay in the Top 10 for overall attendance, averaging 33,654 fans per game at Comerica. And these are not some fair-weather fans there to be seen. The crowds get there early when the gates open and are paying attention to the action on the field, decked out in feline gear, sometimes head to toe.

It goes without saying that the crowd here is into the game, even the somewhat meaningless late-season contest for this review. Tigers fans are the real deal, and if you don't believe it, just go to a game and hear for yourself.

Access    4

Comerica Park is located in the north end of downtown Detroit, framed by I-75 and 375 and state roads 10 and 1.

Befitting the Motor City, driving is easily the best option, but once you get to downtown, the automated Detroit People Mover ($1.50 unlimited rides/day) circles downtown. The Detroit Department of Transportation buses ($1.50) on lines 16, 18, 23, 31, 49, and 53 on Woodward all stop close to the park.

It is similarly unsurprising that there are over 25 official parking lots around Comerica. The VIP lots closest to the ballpark and nearby Ford Field are $25, while the lots directly on the other side of Woodward run $15-$20. The lots closer to Grand River are $10-$15, and cheaper private lots ($5-$10) can be found further afield if you are willing to walk or take the People Mover to and from the park.

It is worth noting that Comerica Park has some of the best entrances in the majors, with each gate carefully guarded by giant Tiger statues of various sizes and ferocity. Visitors should get to the park early just to see all the cats, especially at the main entrances at Gate A and B. But if you're looking for a quick entrance, Gates C and especially non-descript Gate D will get you in the fastest. But Gate D is the way to go, as it will also dump you right by home plate.

Once you get in, getting around is no problem. One wide promenade extends around the entire stadium at the top of the lower deck seating bowl, where most of the concessions lie. Large plazas are in front of the main entrances to prevent bunching up and bottlenecks when the gates open and on the way out. A smaller walkway separates the lower seating bowl to allow more flow of the crowd. The upper deck has a similar promenade that runs the length of the section, but it is broken up in sections because of the upper deck seating areas. This isn't too much of a problem unless you need to go from one upper deck section to another.

Return on Investment    4

The Tigers have enjoyed some success in recent years which has driven up costs a bit, but an evening of Tigers baseball still sits at just about the MLB average from a cost perspective.

Ticket costs vary game-by-game and section by section, but the average ticket will run you just shy of $30 and premium seats for a little less than $75, which isn't bad--within the rarified air of the MLB (AL rivals Yankees and Red Sox average more than $50 per standard ticket, for example).

Food prices are also reasonable for the MLB. Most things are kept around $10 or under if you're on a budget. Drink prices keep it on the low side for the MLB, with a beer available for $6.75, though big or craft brews trend more ($9.25-$10.50). Parking costs in the Motor City is above average, but cheaper options are available slightly further afield from the official lots, and the program and scorecard are just about the MLB average.

The Tigers offer the regular array of discounts. Full and half-season plans are available, as well as 27/8, 15, and 4-game packs. These all come with discounts per ticket, as well as discounted parking and other perks. Groups of 15 or more can also get special discounts. And, of course, 11 luxury suites of increasing swagness are on offer for big spenders. Other group events are available at the many special locations in the park (all with all-you-can-eat buffets): the party decks, party plazas, the Tiger Club, the Blue Moon Brewhouse (with three slices of pizza per person instead of a buffet), and the Witherell Lounge.

Extras    5

If this score could be 50 out of 5, it really should be. Certain other parks do get their venue right. Fenway Park and Wrigley Field, for example, practically scream the history that's part of their parks' DNA. The new Yankee Stadium's stately bunting and cavernous Great Hall evokes that storied franchise's proud and no-nonsense record. But there's not another park in the majors that, for lack of a better term, buys into their concept so completely--and successfully. Other parks may have individual facilities that exceed their counterparts at Comerica, but none come close to getting the whole experience on the same level.

Tigers, tigers, everywhere, for a start. If you ever have temporary amnesia, you'll be quickly reminded by the tiger sculptures that guard each entrance and look down from the facade in rows with baseballs stuffed in their mouths.

The other most obvious feature of the park is the retired numbers sculpture garden in left field, featuring Ty Cobb, Charlie Gehringer, Hank Greenberg, Willie Horton, Al Kaline, and Hal Newhouser.

Over in right field displays those honored without statues include managers and player-managers Hughie Jennings, Mickey Cochrane, and Sparky Anderson; players Harry Heilmann, Henie Manush, Sam Crawford, and George Kell; announcer Ernie Harwell; and, of course, Jackie Robinson's 42. Legendary announcer Harwell is also honored with his own statue by the main entrance to the park.

Plaques outside the park commemorate the park construction, "Turkey" Stearnes, The College of Law (that previously stood on the location of the park), and Ty Cobb (in a plaque brought over from Tiger Stadium). The placard for the Michigan High School Baseball Hall of Fame is also tucked into the right field of the park.

The Tigers utilize their long history throughout the park on their "Walk of Fame." On the main promenade banners hang for each decade, punctuated by more substantial displays of the championship decades of the 1900s, 1920s, 1940s, and 1980s. The D Store, the expansive team store accessible from inside and outside the park (but closed on the outside once gates open), even gets into the act with a history of the Tiger's iconic old English D. While looking in the past, the merchandise, at least, has one foot in the future, with a right field stand to get yourself 3D modeled into a Tigers figurine.

A stadium filled with tigers statues already has plenty of whimsy points, but it doesn't end there. A giant tiger carousel dominates the Big Cat Court ($2/ride), and a small baseball Ferris Wheel can be found at the end of Brushfire Grill area ($2/ride), just past giant baseball topiary. The Chevrolet Fountain in center delivers high-tech "liquid fireworks" during appropriate moments during the game.

Suffice to say, Comerica Park is quite the experience, even if just to walk around.

Final Thoughts

Comerica Park is a spectacle before you get to watch the game on the field--and the fans here watch the game. It won't break the bank to have a night out at this great downtown park, and you'll hardly regret an excursion there.

CoPa?

Never has anyone in Detroit referred to Comerica Park as CoPa.

by thekoolaid08 | Sep 19, 2014 03:55 PM

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Crowd Reviews

Comerica Park: Detroit's Diamond in the Rough

Total Score: 4.14

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 4

Completed in 2000, Comerica Park ushered the Detroit Tigers into the 21st century. A stark contrast from rustic Tiger Stadium, Detroit's new wide-aisled, well-decorated home features many amusements for both adults and children.

Love Comerica

Total Score: 3.71

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

Tiger Stadium was my first ballpark experience, and while I miss the old classic park, Comerica is really a great place to see a game. The field is slightly raised, giving those people with seats near the field amazing views. I will definitely be making a trip to Comerica this year.

Better Each Year

Total Score: 3.57

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 4

Just took my 3 year-old son to his first Tigers game yesterday. He loved the experience, and it was clear that the Tigers have made family-friendly a priority. I thought that food & beverage was fine, but a bit overpriced. I do love the Little Caesar's pizza, and it tastes extra good there to me. The atmosphere is great, and they do a good job of combining the tradition of a 100+ year old team, with a new, and fun stadium.

The neighborhood has gone from abysmal to passing to above average in the past decade. The fans are above average and the park is very easy to get to. Bathroom lines were a bit long later in the game, and not as clean as I would like.

Costs are a little high on all counts., bu tnot unreasonable.

Extra points for the baseball ferris wheel, and Tigers carousel. Also for the great statues in left field, and newer statue of Ernie Harwell in the concourse behind home plate.

Topps Baseball Card Stand

Total Score: 0.00

  • Food & Beverage: 0
  • Atmosphere 0
  • Neighborhood: 0
  • Fans: 0
  • Access: 0
  • RoI: 0
  • Extras: 0

I'm glad you and your son enjoyed yourselves in my home away from home.

I hope you visited one of the several baseball card stands in the concourse. A newer feature, you could have jump started your son's baseball card collection, while giving him his first Detroit baseball experience.

Comerica Park

Total Score: 3.29

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 2

Food and Beverage -

The food and drinks here are mostly ballpark fare, and since the Tigers are owned by the Illitches, Little Caesars is crammed down your throat when you are there. There are a few upscale bars and clubs inside the ballpark if it tickles your fancy, but the concourse food and beer (Budweiser and Labatt products, $8.50 a 24 oz can from vendors) is pretty in depth and on the pricey side as well. I'd recommend eating at a restaurant or bar (Nemo's is my choice - down across the street from where Tiger Stadium was) before coming to the game. If you can find them, the church right next to CoPa will frequently sell peanuts for cheap outside the ballpark.

Atmosphere -

Tiger fans know their baseball, and the majority of them are the blue collar "tell you like it is" fans and absolutely hate the Yankees and White Sox (and the Twins recently) with more passion than usual. Gameday atmosphere is usually pretty good unless the Tiggers are awful or the game is meaningless.

Neighboorhood -

For being in downtown Detroit, the neighborhood surrounding the ballpark isn't bad at all. There are many Detroit landmarks within walking distance, such as the Fox Theatre, Ford Field and Hockeytown Cafe which are all across one street or another. There's a Cheli's Chili Bar and an upscale bar over by the Detroit Athletic Club, but I wouldn't traverse too far north, east or west as everything quickly deteriorates the farther away you get from the stadium district.

Fans -

Detroit fans are some of the best fans and most diverse of any sport that I have seen. There are always a contingent of baseball-smart guys, the boyfriend-girlfriends just out for a game, drunks and rich people. The fans overall are great, smart and yearn for a winner more than any other sports team in Detroit.

Access -

Comerica Park is right off of a few highways and can be spotted from a couple miles away on the highway. Parking is not a problem, and it's the "closer to the stadium the more expensive it is" variety. The Tigers advertise $5 dollar parking as part of their "Always $5" deals (others being hot dogs, and skyline (upper deck left field next to the scoreboard)), but it's pretty iffy as to security.

Return on Investment -

Every time I go to a ballgame here, I always feel like I have a good experience, but I'm not ecstatic about the prices. At least they base the ticket prices on who they are playing and what time of the year it is. The ticket prices are quite reasonable, it's just the concessions that I'm not a fan of. The ballpark is not the same as Tiger Stadium, but that's not necessarily a terrible thing.

Extras - I'll give one star for how nice it is to walk the concourse before or after the game, and one for the nice Tiger carosel and baseball ferris wheel.

Great park for a day out with the family

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 5

There are so many extras to entertain the kiddos that I think this park can really make for a great day out with the whole family.

Saturday Night

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

So, I've never thought of this before, but if you are attending a game at Comerica Park, make sure you check to see if there are any event sat Ford Field the same night. I went on the night that Taylor Swift was playing at the home of the Lions. Parking was a nightmare, and costly ($30). Luckily the game ended before the concert.

Better than expected

Total Score: 3.00

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 2

Food and Beverage 3/5

They have all the basic ballpark food items. They do try to put little ceasers down your throat. They had a good deal on a hot dog combo for $5 that came with a hot dog, a soft drink, and a bag of chips. Had a decent selection of beers. Overall, prices were average, the food selection was above average, and the food quality was average.

Atmosphere 3/5

There really wasn't a buzz around the ballpark before the game other than the Taylor Swift concert that was across the street. There was hardly any tailgating for the game. There's a few nice bars in the area like Hockeytown and Cheli's. The area around the ballpark felt safe. The workers inside were very friendly and probably the friendliest out of all the ballparks I've been to (I've only been to 4).

Neighborhood 2/5
Not much of a downtown to explore in detroit. Seeing the skyline during the game was good, but I know that other staduims have a better skyline. I wouldn't venture out too many blocks of Comerica Park. During the game there's a heavy police presence outside of the ballpark.

Fans 3/5

The fans we spoke to were friendly. The fans were involved in the game. They all seem to love Brandon Inge.

Access 4/5

The ballpark is right of the highway and was easy to get to the stadium and to get out of the stadium. I'm just grateful that the Taylor Swift concert didn't get out at the same time as the Tigers game.

Return on Investment 4/5

We got great tickets for a decent price. I'm from the Chicagoland and used to paying a lot for a good seat. There was fireworks after the game which was a bonus.

Extras 2/5

They have a ferris wheel in the ball park which is unqiue, but there's not much else to the park. The team has good talent with Miguel Cabrera and Justin Verlander.

Reluctantly Pleased

Total Score: 4.29

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 4

Being a City of Detroit native and having attended several games at Tiger Stadium during the World Series winning 1984 season, I was very sad when they tore down the old stadium and built a new stadium. The minimalist, proletariat Tiger Stadium had a tough love quality that always appealed to me. So on my first visit to Comerica Park I was primed to be disappointed. Indeed, I found the giant cats in the entry way to be cheesy and a tad vulgar. We had the worst seats possible that night, top deck- which should've sealed the deal..... however, the beer venders came frequently and were friendly, the Tigers won that game and there were free fireworks afterward. Getting in and out was easy, and parking was nearby and not very expensive. Darn Comerica Park won me over! On my second visit, we had much better seats, and as a Mom-to-be I appreciated all the kids' activities. I reluctantly enjoyed that visit even more than the first. Though I will still take my kids to see the old home of Tiger Stadium in Cork Town, I will definitely take them to Comerica Park for a game, too.

GREAT BALLPARK :D

Total Score: 5.00

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

Back in 2001 when I attended Comerica park for the Tigers/Yankees game, I was amazed at the features it had in it. And now, I literally can't stop thinking about going again. It has a ferris wheel and a carousel, the food's delicious and the view of Detroit from the upper deck is picture perfect. The atmosphere is very electric and they offer great things for kids including the "Tigers kids club", their mascot "PAWS" who can be seen throughout the park at all home games and other neat things. It's inexpensive and a great time waster. So come on down to the cheer on Motown.

Comerica the Beautiful

Total Score: 4.14

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

The opening of Comerica Park in 2000 was met with a great deal of resistance by Tigers fans who had developed a strong bond with Tiger Stadium at the corner of Michigan and Trumbull. In many ways, Comerica Park was the antithesis of the old home of the Tigers. It was criticized for being too much of a carnival atmosphere, lacking the classic charm of the old navy-colored ball yard.

The criticism of Comerica Park has been unjust. It is a completely fair sentiment to miss Tiger Stadium (especially now that it’s been demolished), or to believe that the Tigers should have never moved, but Comerica Park is of itself, a really wonderful stadium. Sentimentality aside, a trip to see the Detroit Tigers at Comerica Park should be on the list for any fan of America’s Pastime.

The Tigers are one of the founding members of the American League from 1901, and the only one of the eight teams that has never changed their home city or nickname. The history is certainly there, the modern and comfortable ballpark is there, and the team itself has been rather good for the past several years, so this is a great time to see what Detroit has to offer.

Food in the Upper Deck

Total Score: 4.29

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

I attended a game recently against the Rockies, and I have realized how much better the food selection is on the lower concourse. If you have upper deck tickets, which is my preference, be sure to buy your food on the lower concourse before ascending to your seats.

Comerica is beautiful.

Total Score: 4.43

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

It took a lot of guts for Mike Illitch to knock down beloved Tiger Stadium and build Comerica Park, but I'm glad he did. Tiger fans of all ages can venture to this ballpark and be visually amazed at this masterpiece of a stadium. The most notable features of the field of play are the keyhole (the strip of dirt from home plate to the pitcher's mound) and the dirt around home plate being shaped like home plate.

Comerica Park's main appeal is the attention to detail inside and out. From the ornate tile, brickwork, and sculpted tigers on the outside of the stadium to the tiger carousel and baseball ferris wheel, this stadium has the best design in all of MLB. The statues honoring Tiger greats are beautiful, the scoreboard is massive, and the gameday atmosphere is electric. Even the metal drain covers underneath the General Motors fountain in centerfield have the Tigers logo on them!

CoPa

Total Score: 4.14

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

I miss the stadium of old, RIP Tiger Stadium, but Comerica Park will always be a great place to watch baseball and the occasional concert.

Comerica

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

Attended the Tigers/White Sox game on Sunday night, 9/2/12, with Verlander vs Sale and it was an absolute playoff atmosphere with over 42,000 in attendance. This really is a fantastic park, with good food, good fans, an improving neighborhood and wonderful sightlines. Every time I go, I like it a little more.

Playoff Baseball

Total Score: 4.43

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

I took my five year old son to his first playoff baseball game at Comerica this season. It was Game 1 of the ALDS against Oakland. One thing that you need to know about playoff games is that you need to be entering the ballpark earlier than usual. Most fans paid a lot of money and they don't want to miss a pitch. It took us about 20 minutes to get in the main home plate gate.

We were able to make it in time for the first pitch, and seconds later Coco Crisp took a Justin Verlander pitch out to right field. It turned out to be the A's only run of the game, but it sure did instantly take the noise level down.

That aside, fans are amazing at a playoff game, as is the atmosphere, We sat in the fourth row of the upper deck near first base for $80/ticket. Well worth the money.

If you can go to a playoff MLB game, don't miss out. You won't regret it.

Depends On How You Look At It

Total Score: 4.29

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

Anybody who has been to Comerica Park after going to Tiger Stadium for years will give it an unfair grade. Tiger Stadium was a classic park that to this day should not have been exposed to the wrecking ball. With that said, Comerica Park is a gem. I think most fans hate Comerica Park because it replaced Tiger Stadium and nothing more.

Yes, Comerica Park is pretty much the polar opposite of Tiger Stadium in every manner (away from the field of play, HR's hard to come by, and the baseball atmosphere isn't as there as Tiger Stadium as well as needless points of a Ferris Wheel and a Carousel), but some of it is good: better variety of food, sightlines and a lack of an overhang, and the area they put it is by far better than Tiger Stadium.

Games at Comerica seem to have a little more intensity now the Tigers have returned to near the top of the baseball world. The neighborhood has a few more things to go eat at and you won't have to avoid getting mugged/murdered as you feared might happen at Tiger Stadium. Parking is still sketchy at times, but not in a jam like it was at the old ballpark.

But it seems like there is something for everybody at the game, and that is quite all right with me.

Great Ballpark in a Crumbling City

Total Score: 3.71

  • Food & Beverage: 2
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 2
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 4

It's a shame that such a beatiful ballpark exists in a dying city. The view of the city skyline is similar to sitting at PNC park in Pittsburgh. The crowd is energetic and they love their tigers. The wall of names in left field is also very nice and lets the crowd tie in to the rich history of the tigers. I have to say the food was nothing to right home about. The chilli dogs are meh. Good choice of beers especially the nice Canadian beers that they have on tap. All in all a great stadium and great atmosphere unfortunately once you travel about 2 miles outside of the stadium and you are in an urban death spiral. Such a shame.

Comerica Park Visit

Total Score: 3.71

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 3

I enjoyed my visit to Comerica Park but I’ll probably not head back to Detroit again (unless I go see a Red Wings game). Saw two excellent games – one a hit fest; the other a pitcher’s duel. The Sat evening game was Motown Night and the organization did a great job with the theme replaying Marvin Gaye’s 1968 singing of the National Anthem at Tigers Stadium, there were lots of trivia questions between innings, the Four Tops entertained the crowd on the concourse pre-game, and Duke Fakir threw out the first pitch. I’m not normally into entertainment outside the ballgame, but the Tigers did a nice job this night.

There’s a nice scoreboard which kept a good display of pitch count and speed and there were full crowds both games. I had good neighbors both nights. I didn’t eat at the stadium but it appeared there was a variety of choices. If you like trying local brews when visiting a ballpark, check out the Michigan Craft Beer concession. They have all Michigan beers and the service was excellent. Founders All Day IPA – Yum!

The biggest downside was the bathrooms were pretty disgusting (at least the ladies room). Water and paper all over a dirty cement floor, stalls were heavily scratched and had chipped paint.

If you haven’t been yet, plan on going. I stayed at the Hilton Garden Inn Downtown just two blocks from the stadium and would recommend it.

And, I did go on the ferris wheel.

Comerica Park

Total Score: 4.43

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

A great place to catch a game. My favorite seats are in left field where you can watch pitchers warmup in the bullpen. It is an easy stadium to get too and parking is easily accessible around the stadium with minimal walking. There are also some great eats around the stadium such as Rub & Pub BBQ. There is also plenty to do before the game once inside the stadium especially for kids with a carousel and also a ferris wheel with baseball shaped cars. Have been to plenty of games there and have always left extremly satisfied. A beautiful ballpark!

At the CoPa

Total Score: 3.71

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 3

Comerica Park, also affectionately known as the CoPa amongst many locals, is the home of the Detroit Tigers and is nestled in the heart of downtown Detroit in the Fox Town District. The stadium is in the midst of its 14th year of existence after opening in 2000 and replacing a beloved Detroit icon in Tiger Stadium. Comparing the two stadiums is a favorite pastime of Detroiters, however that has not stopped Tiger fans from coming out in droves to the tune of more than 3 million fans in both 2012 and 2013.

The ballpark has definitely seen the lowest of lows and the highest highs with the dreadful teams that occupied the facility in the early 2000s to now having a team that is routinely competing for a championship and has hosted October baseball in three consecutive seasons (2011-2013).

Comerica Park does not necessarily get the publicity of other parks around the league, thus making it a bit under-rated among many of the stadium ranking lists that are out there. The park has done an amazing job of reminding the fan where you are and the team you are seeing, while blending the history of the storied franchise with the history that is currently being made.

Rainy Day

Total Score: 4.29

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

Went to Comerica Park and the game was delayed by about 30 minutes after a heavy rain storm passed through. My seats were in section 332, row A (front row of the upper deck). Unfortunately my seats had two inches on the floor in front of me. Park needs to work on the drainage in some rows.

Overall, big fan of this ballpark. Great for families and food improves every year.

Let's Go Tigers

Total Score: 3.86

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

A great place to watch a ballgame, but still not as homey as old Tiger Stadium. The lower deck is great, but the upper deck seems so far away compared to old Tiger Stadium. There still are no bad seats here. Construction all around the stadium makes it harder to get in and out of the area, but once the construction is finished it is pretty easy to navigate around.

Share your thoughts about Comerica Park

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