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Angel Stadium of Anaheim

Anaheim, CA

Home of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

4.0

3.9

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Angel Stadium of Anaheim (map it)
2000 Gene Autry Way
Anaheim, CA 92806


Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim website

Angel Stadium of Anaheim website

Year Opened: 1966

Capacity: 45,050

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Halo Heaven

In today’s professional sports world, many cities build brand new stadiums, leaving memories of the franchise past in literal rubble. Angel Stadium is one of the few however, that has been successful in incorporating its past with modern amenities for nearly 50 years. While many venues, including its Southern California neighbor PETCO Park, are still clamoring for a first All-Star game, this iconic venue has already hosted three. The stadium’s bucket list is certainly shrinking as it has already hosted a deciding World Series Championship game, no-hitters, a 500th home run, and a 3,000th hit.

Believe it or not, when Gene Autry originally founded the team, Wrigley Field was the first home of the Angels during the 1961 season. Not the world-famous Wrigley Field in Chicago, but rather the Los Angeles version named for the same William Wrigley Jr. This venue was quickly deemed unsuitable for MLB baseball due to a ridiculous power alley that averaged three home runs per game. The solution would have the Angels sharing Chavez Ravine with the Los Angeles Dodgers from 1962 to 1965. In 1964, construction on a stadium in Anaheim began and would carry a final cost of approximately $24 million. In 1966, the Angels were ready to invite approximately 43,200 fans and call it home. Upon opening its gates, it would be referred to as Anaheim Stadium and eventually nicknamed “The Big A.”

Unfortunately for many baseball fans, the NFL’s Los Angeles Rams began to share the stadium in 1980. The demand for additional seating would call for the stadium to become enclosed to accommodate an additional 23,000 seats. While the seating capacity was now at roughly 65,000, it would come at a tremendous cost in that it would block the beautiful views of the San Gabriel Mountains and Route 57. The stadium had unfortunately joined the growing multi-purpose stadium movement.

In 1995, the Rams left for St. Louis and in 1997 baseball gods would look down upon Anaheim once again and declare that the stadium would be re-opened. Approximately $100 million in renovations would give the Angel fans a true ballpark once again. The new look would make its debut on April 1, 1998.

4.0

What is FANFARE?

The FANFARE scale is our metric device for rating each stadium experience. It covers the following:

  • Food & Beverage
  • Atmosphere
  • Neighborhood
  • Fans
  • Access
  • Return on Investment
  • Extras

Each area is rated from 0 to 5 stars with 5 being the best. The overall composite score is the "FANFARE Score".

Food & Beverage    4

Angel Stadium does a great service to its fans, incorporating both some local flavors as well as the predictable chain restaurants.

The chain restaurants include Jack-In-The-Box, Chronic Tacos, and Panda Express. Expect a 40% premium to their normal prices for the privilege to eat within the stadium.

If fans are a bit more adventurous, there are multiple other items to try within the confines of the stadium. Some of the typical stadium fare includes pizza (Nicky Enzo's for $9.75), Angel Dog ($4.50), peanuts ($2.50 or $6), bottomless popcorn ($8), garlic parmesan fries ($7.50), angus cheeseburger ($6.75), turkey burger ($7.75), churro ($5), buffalo bites ($9.50 with fries), pretzel ($3.50), and cracker jacks ($3.50). The Cali Dog ($7) is a favorite; taking a fair-inspired theme and frying a hot dog while covering it in cheese, salsa or other condiments.

At the Major League Deli, you can get a California Turkey Club, New York Pastrami, Cuban Panini, or Brisket Griller; each for $9.75.

Perhaps the most famous items at Angel Stadium are found at Clyde Wright's BBQ. Mr. Wright is a name familiar to most Angel fans as he threw the first no hitter for the Angels at Anaheim Stadium. Some of the options here include Pulled Pork/Beef BBQ ($9.75), BBQ Beef Brisket ($9.75), Skeeter ($8.50), Italian sausage ($8), Louisana hot link ($8), Bratwurst ($8), or an "All-Star" dog ($7.50).

For those desiring Mexican treats, options include street tacos ($7.50) and a slew of nacho varieties. These include the signature barbacoa nachos ($9.25), heavenly nachos ($9.25), and big league nachos ($6.50). The most stunning option carried a price tag of $16.50, and was virtually a full size Angels helmet full of loaded nachos.

Melissa's Fresh For You stand provides a variety of healthier options. Here, fans can enjoy a black bean burger, veggie dog, and other calorie-conscious foods.

Some of the beverage options include Coke products in a variety of sizes. Options include the kid's size for $2.75, medium for $4.50, and a large souvenir for $6. Other options include Gatorade ($6), Lipton Iced Tea ($6), ICEE ($4.50), Monster Energy ($5) and bottled water for $3.75.

The beer options are plentiful as you can get varying sizes at most stands ($4.50, $7.75, $9, and even $10 for the souvenir cup). The premium drafts go for slightly more, usually priced at $10 and $12.75. Some of the beer options include Coors, Blue Moon, Miller Lite, Harp, Smithwick's, Guinness, Fat Tire, and even local favorites from Hangar and Bootlegger's breweries.

For those who do not prefer beer, premium cocktails range from $10 to $12.50, wine at $8, and a frozen margarita yard is $14.50.

Atmosphere    4

Once you set foot in Angel Stadium, and even into the early innings you'll notice a rather relaxed atmosphere. The sun is usually shining, the mountains surrounding the stadium are in view, and most of the fans are still caught in traffic.

This is a good opportunity to check out the Angels Authentics section which houses some interesting merchandise commemorating great moments at the stadium. You may also gander to the Budweiser Pavilion and check out the secluded retired numbers or the Angel's Hall of Fame behind home plate.

The game starts off with the song "Calling All Angels" by Train, which is a nice touch for incorporating the team nickname, but isn't necessarily a tune that pumps you up for the game. Another song familiar to Angel fans is "Fill Me Up Buttercup," which is played during the seventh inning at every home game.

The landmark "California Spectacular" seems to be the cue for a lot of the atmosphere. This familiar site in centerfield features erupting geysers and steams that cascade down an artificial mountainside with trees. Fireworks are set off from the display at the start of the game, after home runs, and after wins.

The best part of the atmosphere is easily summed up in two words: "Rally Monkey." Never did I dream that such a simple idea of the image of a monkey on the scoreboard would get the fans so invigorated. I'm sure few will admit it, but many Angels fans may hope that their team is trailing in the late innings just for a chance to see this digital mascot.

Unfortunately the intro to his appearance is a bit drawn out. At first, the fan's interest is piqued by subtle images of "If You Make Noise, He Will Come." Unfortunately, the fans interest seems to taper as the jumbotron shows images of old movies in an attempt to create a more important climax for the appearance of the monkey. Eventually, the fans who are still awake through the buildup hear the signature line from "Down With the Sickness" by Disturbed and go nuts when the monkey appears with a sign reading "Rally Time." From there the sound system goes into "Jump Around" by House of Pain and the stadium literally goes "ape S**t!"

The one part that I really dislike about the stadium is how much that they have commercialized it. The "California Spectacular" in left-centerfield is ruined by big obvious Monster Energy display. The home run wall and cup holders are covered in advertisements and unfortunately this takes a bit away from the beauty of the stadium.

A popular phrase after an Angel's win is "Light up that Halo!" Listen as fans shout it out after the game. What they are referring to is the large "A" outside of the stadium. After a win, the halo will illuminate and inform passersby of an Angels' win.

Neighborhood    3

If nothing else, Anaheim is known for being home to Disneyland & California Adventure. In fact, fans can see the nightly Disney fireworks from Angel Stadium.

Immediately next to the stadium, you'll find "The Grove," a 1,700 person concert venue. Check the schedule to see if you would be interested in catching a show during your visit to Anaheim Stadium. On any given week, you'll get a chance to see nationally known comedians or musicians.

While there are few options within reasonable walking distance, the nearby Katella Avenue has a variety of options. "The Catch" and several fast food options (Panda Express, Carls Jr, McDonalds) can be found to the west of the stadium.

Drive a bit further east on Katella however and there are many fun options. JT Schmid's is a popular local brewery/restaurant, while the Pint House is quickly gaining fame with its craft beer selection. The Lazy Dog Café is a popular local chain for families and the Tilted Kilt has a little more of an edge to it.

Danny K's Billards provides some fun while you eat, while Spin! Neopolitan Pizza, Katella Grill, Chili's, and Acapulco Mexican round out the food options.

Already full and looking for some entertainment before or after the game? The Cinemark movie theater is also just minutes from the stadium.

Fans    4

The Angels make it easy for fans to want to show up during the season with the great giveaways offered at the stadium. It seems that year after year the team comes up with clever options, with everything from wrestling masks to Chia Rally Monkeys.

Behind home plate, you'll find a huge list of season ticket holders and if you look closely, you'll notice that many of them have been around for quite a few years.

The fans do seem to truly enjoy themselves at the game, namely the children. The area in the centerfield concourse offers children all sorts of fun including the halo toss, speed pitch, and video game area. You will also notice most of them carrying plush rally monkeys around the stadium. The Angels have embraced these little leaguers and even show little league cards of their current players on some of the walls throughout the concourse.

I've noticed that most Angels fans are passionate, but not overly passionate like their cross-town rivals. They seem to support the team through thick and thin and make their support known to the players throughout the game.

Access    4

Visitors to the region will be surprised to find that Angel Stadium is easily accessed from Disneyland, the Honda Center, Knott's Berry Farm, or even the John Wayne Airport.

Traffic is always a given in Southern California, but luckily Anaheim is a bit less congested than Los Angeles. Luckily, the area surrounding the stadium is not overly developed, and therefore, aside from rush hour, commuting by vehicle should not create too many issues.

If you are not driving to the stadium, other transportation options include the Metrolink Orange Line or Amtrak. These railways drop you off at the edge of the parking lot, providing easy access to the stadium. This is a large benefit for fans in San Luis Obispo, Los Angeles, and San Diego as they can now easily get to the stadium without fighting traffic.

For a professional Southern California-based team, parking is extremely reasonable at $10.00. There are three entrances to the lot and you can enter any one of them as early as 2.5 hours prior to the game.

Unfortunately, unless your desire is to walk around the stadium or try and snag some batting practice balls, there is little or no reason to show up early. That's due to the unfortunate restrictions on tailgating. Alcohol is strictly prohibited and only approved grilling devices are allowed. This was probably my biggest complaint with the venue. With such a vast parking lot, a bit removed from the downtown, this provides the perfect setting (similar to Milwaukee) for great tailgating. Most fans would likely even pay a few extra dollars for parking if tailgating was incorporated into the gameday experience.

Some extra access points go to the stadium for a policy that you rarely find at professional venues. Here you can exit and re-enter the stadium at the Home Plate Gate with a hand stamp and a ticket stub. Now, should you forget something in your vehicle, you are not necessarily out of luck!

The restrooms are not difficult to come by as there are 24 each for both men and women. At no point during my many visits this 2013 season did I experience any overly long lines or frustrations with the restrooms.

Return on Investment    4

For a professional team in Southern California, the Angels offer some amazing values in regards to parking and cuisine prices. Even the beer prices are amazingly reasonable compared to the region's other venues, namely the one across the street.

As for the tickets, the stadium offers over 30 different ticket prices (with prices varying greatly due to the opponent). Tickets can be had for as low as $5.00 for adults, but you can score some really decent seats for $40.00.

For a family-centric experience, the Angels have to be tough to beat in terms of ROI. Between the rally monkey, the carnival area in right field, and overall family-friendly culture, children will certainly have a memorable experience. Of course, fans without children can have an enjoyable experience as well, but it certainly can be improved with more nearby entertainment (see PETCO Park) or tailgating (see UCLA football) that many fans appreciate at other local venues.

Extras    5

Despite its age, Angel Stadium still has its fair share of "Extras" for fans to enjoy around the stadium.

On the non-tangible side, the resiliency of the stadium should be noted. In 1994, the Northridge earthquake caused nearly $4 million in damages to the stadium. Despite the bruises, the necessary repairs were made and the venue was "back in uniform" in no time.

Most notable among the extras is the "Big A" sign now found in the parking lot & easily viewed from the 57 freeway. At 210 tons and 230 feet tall, this landmark is familiar to most Southern California residents. It was formerly part of the interior stadium and acted as the scoreboard, but was moved to the parking lot during renovations to expand the stadium. The halo at the top of the sign is illuminated when the Angels win. Other than letting passersby know that the home team has won, there is an LED screen that provides updates on the game, upcoming promotions, or sponsor messages.

The stadium has witnessed its fair share of baseball history over the years. With some stadiums still hoping to host a first All-Star Game, this venue has hosted three (1967, 1989, & 2010)! The 2002 World Series was won here and the 2006 World Baseball Classic was also played here. Beyond just some of the big games, the stadium has been witness to several big events. Mickey Mantle hit his final game-winning home run here, Nolan Ryan once struck out nine straight batters, Reggie Jackson hit home run #500 and Vladimir Guerrero launched #400. Two Hall-of-Famers, Rod Carew and George Brett, each recorded hit #3,000 in Anaheim.

Credit is also given to the stadium for appearing in two major motion pictures. Everyone certainly remembers Angel Stadium from the movie "Naked Gun: From the Files of Police Squad," although many of the interior shots were actually filmed at Dodger Stadium. The lesser-known movie starring the Angels was "Angels in the Outfield," starring Danny Glover. Unfortunately once again, many of the interior shots for this movie were filmed at the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum.

Another can't miss landmark is the plaza in front of the stadium. Here you will spot the iconic giant Angels hats. Even if you parked in the rear of the stadium, be sure you circle around and get a look at these attractions that even common tourists stop to gawk at. Look inside of the hats to note the hat size of 649 1/2 on the sweatband. Below the hats, fans will find a full-size brick infield. The distance between the mound and the bases is regulation, so this presents an opportunity to get a feel for the size of a true MLB diamond. The bricks near the respective positions list the names of the Angels players since 1961 who have started at these positions. Other bricks in the plaza can be purchased for $99 and engraved with a fan's name or message.

Once inside of the stadium, fans can find bronze statues saluting two iconic members of the Angel family. At gate two, fans will find Gene Autry and Michelle Carew at gate three. Close to both of these statues is the music garden located at Gate 1. This spacious area allows you to get away from the action and sometimes enjoy some post-game concerts.

Also found inside the stadium is a small carnival area in the right field concourse. Here, younger fans can participate in the "Halo Toss," play some videogames, and even get a commemorative photo taken.

Lastly, most casual fans would perhaps note the "California Spectacular" in centerfield as an extra as it is commonly viewed during gameplay. While 90% of the viewers see the pennants, the mountains, streams, & seldom used geysers, the best viewing is from behind. If fans walk the concourse in centerfield, they will see a large "A" rock formation and a small waterfall.

Final Thoughts

On more of a personal note, as the years pass covering Southern California venues for Stadium Journey, my appreciation is really growing for Angel Stadium. While some of the other local venues (such as the Lakers, Kings, Galaxy, USC, or UCLA) receive more Fanfare, visiting them can become almost a chore after dealing with traffic, ticket prices, & lack of a fan-centric atmosphere. Angel Stadium is relatively easy to get in and out of, the concessions are very reasonably priced for an MLB ballpark, and the fan experience seems paramount.

I would still like to see the Angels do away with their "All-Fan Giveaway (but only while supplies last)" and become a destination for Southern California tailgating, but total operation remains one of the better ones in professional sports.

The sports fan can find a myriad of reasons to check out an Angel's game in Anaheim during the course of his or her lifetime. Obviously, any stop in Los Angeles for business warrants a visit, but incorporating a visit when you take the kids to Disneyland, stopping on the way to San Diego, or during a vacation to one of the beach cities of Orange Country are other options.

Although Angel Stadium has now become the 4th oldest in the MLB (trailing only Fenway, Wrigley, and Dodger Stadium), it does not show its age as explicitly as many of the other older ones did prior to retirement. Sure, the concourse shows age and the cement ramps remind fans of yesteryear, but Angel Stadium still provides a modern feel for an MLB game.

Whether you call them the California, Los Angeles, or Anaheim Angels, be sure to include their venue in your travel plans next time you are in Southern California.

Follow Drew's travels through Southern California via username @big10drew on Twitter & Instagram.

When getting to the stadium, there is always plenty of parking. Even showing up only 45 minutes bef

When getting to the stadium, there is always plenty of parking. Even showing up only 45 minutes before a game you usually won't have any problem getting into the lots. But once you get there you will have to look at the ugliest giant red helmets behind the home plate area. I have no idea what the purpose is supposed to be other than a New Era hat advertisement. They need to be torn down.
Inside there are the normal food vendors, plus chinese. I have never seen any beer vendors going through the crowd like I am used to at Wrigley or even spring training games.
The main Pro is the price of tickets. There must be a ton of season ticket holders boosting up their numbers because the place is usually at least half empty. On stubhub you can usually find seats for under $10. Under $2 when they are out of the playoff race.

by Scottie84 | Oct 15, 2010 05:22 AM

Love the links to how the stadium looked in previous years

Nice job.

by megminard | Sep 06, 2012 10:50 PM

photo

The cover photo when you click on the link looks worlds better than the one on the front page. The Honda Center, home of the Anaheim Ducks, really stands out in the background

by DrewCieszynski | Jun 21, 2013 06:13 PM

Sorry to add....

Sorry, but my wife and I, seniors as we are, were put off to no end by the constant commercials: LOUD and flashing on every scoreboard and on that idiotic band of moving lights surrounding the field (which concept seems to be spreading across baseball). I felt like I was in a giant pinball machine, with a baseball game going on over to the side.

by doggierover | Oct 16, 2013 03:33 PM

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Crowd Reviews

Calling All Angels

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

With its proximity to downtown Los Angeles and rich baseball history, Dodger Stadium seems to be the venue that most sports fans reminisce about when discussing LA sports stadiums.

Of course, such fans would be close-minded to not mention the allure of Angel Stadium of Anaheim. Since 1966, this venue has been making its mark on Los Angeles-based sports. Few stadiums have been able to adapt so drastically over the years to meet the ever-changing needs of sports fans.

Believe it or not, when Gene Autry founded the team, they called Wrigley Field their home for the 1961 season. No, not the more familiar Wrigley Field in Chicago, but rather the Los Angeles version named for the same owner. As this venue became unsuitable for MLB baseball, due to a ridiculous power alley which averaged three home runs per game, the Angels would share Chavez Ravine with the Los Angeles Dodgers from 1962 to 1965. In 1964, construction on a stadium in Anaheim began and would cost approximately $24 million. In 1966, the Angels were ready to invite approximately 43,200 fans and call it home. Upon opening its gates, it would be referred to as Anaheim Stadium and eventually nicknamed "The Big A."

Unfortunately for many baseball fans, the Los Angeles Rams began to share the stadium in 1980. The demand for additional seating would cause the stadium to become enclosed to accommodate an additional 23,000 seats. Now with a capacity of roughly 65,000, it was unfortunate that this would block the beautiful views of the San Gabriel Mountains and Route 57. The stadium now seemed very different as it appeared like this.

In 1997, the baseball gods would look down upon Anaheim once again and declare that the stadium would be re-opened. Approximately $100 million in renovations would give the Angel fans a true ballpark once again. The new look would make its debut on April 1, 1998. This new layout would offer 5,075 club seats, 68 club level suites, and dugout level suites.

The Stadium of Angels

Total Score: 3.43

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 2

The number 3 plays a significant role when it comes to the Angels and where they are in their history.

Opened April 9, 1966, Angel Stadium of Anaheim is in its third incarnation. Originally named Anaheim Stadium (and commonly referred to as "The Big A"), the facility was enclosed to accommodate the Los Angeles Rams football team for the 1980 season. When the Rams were moved to St. Louis, the stadium was again converted to a baseball-only structure, and given the name of Edison International Field of Anaheim. After six seasons, the name was changed again to its current title, Angel Stadium of Anaheim.

Three different owners have operated the Angel franchise, founder Gene Autry, The Walt Disney Company, and current owner Artie Moreno. Finally, the Angels are set to host their third All-Star Game in 2010, after previously holding the event in 1967 and 1989.

The Angels have won one World Series, the only one they have appeared in, against the San Francisco Giants in 2002. Seven times they have won the AL Western Division title and have claimed the Wild Card once.

Halo Baseball

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

While Angels are often known as intermediaries between heaven and earth, Angel Stadium has been an intermediary between Southern California fans and the game of baseball. There has been no shortness of “baseball miracles” here, including three All-Star games, a World Series Championship, no-hitters, a 500th home run, and a 3,000th hit.

While Dodger Stadium may receive more fanfare, Angel Stadium certainly deserves to be mentioned among baseball’s great venues. Since 1966, this venue has been a key part of Los Angeles-based sports, providing memorable events and the setting for many Hollywood pictures. Few stadiums have been able to adapt so drastically over the years to meet the ever-changing needs of sports fans.

Believe it or not, when Gene Autry originally founded the team, Wrigley Field was the first home of the Angels during the 1961 season. Not the world-famous Wrigley Field in Chicago, but rather the Los Angeles version named for the same William Wrigley Jr. This venue was quickly deemed unsuitable for MLB baseball due to a ridiculous power alley which averaged three home runs per game. The solution would have the Angels sharing Chavez Ravine with the Los Angeles Dodgers from 1962 to 1965. In 1964, construction on a stadium in Anaheim began and would cost approximately $24 million. In 1966, the Angels were ready to invite approximately 43,200 fans and call it home. Upon opening its gates, it would be referred to as Anaheim Stadium and eventually nicknamed “The Big A.”

Unfortunately for many baseball fans, the Los Angeles Rams began to share the stadium in 1980. The demand for additional seating would cause the stadium to become enclosed to accommodate an additional 23,000 seats. Now with a capacity of roughly 65,000, the additional seating would come at a cost in that it would block the beautiful views of the San Gabriel Mountains and Route 57. The stadium now seemed very different as it appeared like this.

In 1997, the baseball gods would look down upon Anaheim once again and declare that the stadium would be re-opened. Approximately $100 million in renovations would give the Angel fans a true ballpark once again. The new look would make its debut on April 1, 1998. This new layout would offer 5,075 club seats, 68 club level suites, and dugout level suites.

a gem in anaheim

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

This was the last stadium on our west coast stadium tour. Diamondbacks,Padres and Dodgers were our first three. I would have to say this was probably the best one. The atmosphere of Angels fans was great. They were playing the first game against the Giants that they have played since the world series. and it was a mixed crowd of giants and angels fans.
Unfortunately we got there late. as we were in Disneyland for most of the day. Disneyland is super close to the stadium by the way.

Very Nice...

Total Score: 4.14

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

Angel Stadium benefits from being located in a beautiful part of the world. Every time I’m in SoCal I try to catch an afternoon game at Angel Stadium. The fans may not be quite as boisterous as at some other stadiums but on the whole it’s a great stadium and a wholly enjoyable experience.

Nice

Total Score: 3.43

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 3

I like Angels Stadium, but it is one of the places I won't drive 2 hours to go see a game unless it was marquee. I could tell it was a multi purpose stadium that was converted, I like the changes, the fans were fun and since it was Opening Day there was lots of interesting happening.

Share your thoughts about Angel Stadium of Anaheim

Local Food & Drink

The Catch  (map it!)

2100 E Katella Ave

Anaheim, CA 92806

(714) 935-0101

http://www.catchanaheim.com/

OC Sports Grill  (map it!)

450 N State College Blvd

Orange, CA 92868

(714) 935-0300

http://www.ocsportsgrill.com/

J.T. Schmid's  (map it!)

2610 E. Katella Avenue

Anaheim, CA 92806

(714) 634-9200

http://jtschmidsrestaurants.com/

Local Entertainment

Disneyland  (map it!)

1313 S Disneyland Dr

Anaheim, CA 92802

(714) 781-4000

http://disneyland.disney.go.com

The Grove of Anaheim  (map it!)

2200 E. Katella Avenue

Anaheim, CA 92806

(714) 712-2700

http://www.grove-of-anaheim.com

Lodging

Ayres Hotel Anaheim  (map it!)

2550 E. Katella Avenue

Anaheim, CA 92806

(800) 595-5692

http://www.ayreshotels.com/anaheim

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