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Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum

Los Angeles, CA

Home of the USC Trojans

4.6

4.2

Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum (map it)
3911 South Figueroa Street
Los Angeles, CA 90037


USC Trojans website

Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum website

Year Opened: 1923

Capacity: 93,607

There are no tickets available at this time.

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FIGHT ON

The Trojan program has traditionally been one of the more notable ones in college football. During the past five years however, the program and its prized facility seem to be at a crossroads. Sanctions against the school affected the product on the field & an aging stadium was affecting the fan experience during gameday.

The sanctions will sort themselves out over time; with its prestige and location, recruits will once more yearn to play at USC.  The future of the stadium is a rather unpredictable one however.  During 2013, the school made a deal to gain control of the formerly state-run facility.  As part of the deal, the school has committed to up to $100 million in renovations to restore the once-great venue.  Naturally, local business, residents, and fans are anxious to see what may come of the changes.

Only the program itself remains older than the venue.  The first football team at the school came to be back in 1888, and was for a period referred to as the "Wesleyans" and the "Methodists." In 1912, the nickname of "Trojans" was adopted and has been embraced ever since.



The Coliseum was opened in 1923 at a construction cost of approximately $954,873, and since then, the Trojans have called The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum their home. Conversely, the Trojan basketball team plays at the modern Galen Center, a venue that has been open less than 10 years.



The stadium has been affectionately nicknamed "The Grand Old Lady" due to its prestige and age. With a capacity of over 93,000, there's ample opportunity for any fan to take in a game at this historic venue.



4.6

What is FANFARE?

The FANFARE scale is our metric device for rating each stadium experience. It covers the following:

  • Food & Beverage
  • Atmosphere
  • Neighborhood
  • Fans
  • Access
  • Return on Investment
  • Extras

Each area is rated from 0 to 5 stars with 5 being the best. The overall composite score is the "FANFARE Score".

Food & Beverage    5

The concessions at the Coliseum are rather dynamic as the lower concourse is mostly filled with temporary stands.

Some of the permanent stands include "Coaches Corner" and "All-American" and have many traditional options. Some of these items include the ¼ lb Tommy dog ($7), college dog ($6), ½ lb Coliseum cheeseburger ($8), fries ($5), grilled chicken sandwich ($8), deluxe wrap ($8), gourmet salad ($8), bratwurst ($8), polish sausage ($8), pulled BBQ pork ($10), popcorn ($6), nachos ($5), soft pretzel ($5), peanuts ($5), candy ($4), or chips ($4). Beverages here include bottled water ($5), soda (24 oz for $5.50 ad 32 oz for $6.50).

From there, things get a bit confusing. A small section of the concourse has a section of food trucks, which could differ from game to game. Most of the concourse is filled with temportarily tents, almost similar to a farmer's market, offering many local favorites. Some of the items spotted this year across the smorgasboard of vendors included turkey legs ($10), nachos ($5, $8 with beef or chicken added), tamales ($6), ice cream sundae ($7), almonds ($5), gourmet candy apples ($9), chocolate strawberries ($5-$10), chicken teriyaki rice bowl ($9), carne asada or grilled chicken tacos (two for $9), burritos ($8), bacon wrapped hot dog ($7), burgers ($6), French fries ($6), Philly cheesesteak ($9), big turkey dog ($8), funnel cake ($7), garlic fries ($7), kettle corn ($7-$10), pretzels ($5), churros ($5), cotton candy ($5 to $7), peanuts ($5), jerk chicken pizza ($5), cheese pizza ($5),12 hour pulled pork ($10), beef tri-tip ($10), chicken ($10), rice and meat bowl ($10), double grilled chicken breast ($10), rib eye steak & chicken breast plate ($12), beef plate with chicken breast ($12), lamb skewers plate ($12), chicken gyro sandwich ($7), lamb gyro sandwich ($8), vegetarian plate ($10), veggie gyro falafel ($7), veggie eggplant gyro ($7), sushi ($10 for standard rolls, $16 for premium) & edamame at $6.

While alcohol is not offered, there are extensive beverage options throughout the concourse. These include natural fruit juices ($6), the famous "Arnold Palmer ($5)," bottled water ($5), fresh squeezed lemonade ($5-$6), bottled soda ($5), coffee ($3), and 16 oz smoothies ($6).

Atmosphere    5

The University of Southern California Trojans have had a track record of unprecedented success and as a result, leave many of the competitors in awe. Annually, every team yearns to play in the Rose Bowl. USC has played in 33 and won 24, with the next most appearances by a school being "only" 20. Pardon them if they dislike losing, after all they've only had three losing seasons since 1961. The success of their program translates into the professional level as well, as the school has produced more first round NFL draft picks than any other.

There are a few things that fans must take part in prior to entering the stadium. First, and most importantly, a visit the iconic statue of Tommy Trojan near the bookstore. Built in 1930, this statue takes its place in thousands of photographs on gameday.

Bask in some USC history during a stop at Heritage Hall, which is located at the center of campus. This three-story building is home to the many honors that the university and athletes have received. Fans will find photos and banners of NCAA championships, Heisman trophies, a bust of John Wayne, as well as plaques of many other honors.

As fans make their way down Trousdale towards the stadium, keep an eye out for the set of flag poles. In fact, no need to keep an eye out, just keep listening. A loud dinging sound emits from fans kicking the USC flag-poles for good luck. Just keep in mind that the intensity with which you kick does not increase or decrease the "good luck," so let's not cause any foot injuries.

Certainly, the historic gameday traditions bolster most of the atmosphere score. It all starts off when the trumpet call is heard and the "Spirit of Troy" (marching band) takes the field playing "Conquest". Even if the marching band is not typically your thing, pay close attention to the drum major.



Potentially the most famous cheer/dance squad of all time can also be spotted on the field before long. The 12 "Song Girls" perform chant and dance routines throughout the contest to conjure up some USC spirit.

Prior to the contest, you'll see "Traveler" (USC's mascot) with the Trojan warrior atop him, trotting around the field. This particular white-colored horse is the VII version and is an inspiration to most USC players and fans. Spectators can also see Traveler trot around the field after Trojan touchdowns. Prior to the start of the fourth quarter, Traveler trots to the opposite endzone and the Trojan warrior stops and faces the arches. He then points his sword to the Olympic Cauldron, which quickly lights aflame.



Potentially the most memorable part of the atmosphere will be during a big drive when USC is scoring first down after first down. Upon a new set of downs or a touchdown, you'll hear the memorable sound of "Fight On". Trust me, this song will be in your head as you are walking from the stadium, unless of course you are a fan of the opposing team. As the band plays this song, look around and watch all of the fans make the "V" (for victory) symbol and push their hands forward in unison.



Now, I cannot confirm the origins of the "V," but some fans have offered suggestions on its origins that are just too darn interesting not to share. Apparently the Trojan Warriors would conquer enemies and cut off their index fingers, being a necessary appendage for the enemy to fight back with. Envision trying to use a sword or shoot a bow without an index finger. To taunt these captives, the Trojan Warriors would hold up their index and middle finger in a "V" shape.



Every third down, the scoreboard simply showed 3 bells, one that read "3rd Down", one with "Get Loud", and one reading "On Your Feet". I felt that it got rather repetitive after awhile and lost its luster with the fans as the game went on.



At certain points during the game, a voice could be heard on the PA system, chanting "U-S-C" or "Let's Go Trojans," but honestly it sounded somewhat amateur and the crowd never really caught onto these chants.



Neighborhood    4

The stadium is a few minutes from downtown Los Angeles, so your food and beverage options are far above and beyond most other schools in America.



Before diving into the appetite however, I need to mention Exposition Park. The area quickly reminded me of Washington D.C. with all of the sights just a few minutes of walking distance from one another. The 160 acre area includes the Coliseum itself, but so much more. The Memorial Sports Arena, Natural History Museum, California Science Center, Exposition Park Rose Garden, California African American Museum, and the Expo Center among others. Clearly, you'll need a day or more to view all of this as each of them could take several hours to view. The most recent attraction here is Space Shuttle Endeavour, which can be found at the California Science Center.

If you are looking for a quick meal before or after the game, fast food joints include Subway, McDonald's, Chick-fil-A, Carl's Jr, Pizza Hut, and Jack-In-The-Box all less than a mile away from the stadium.



Another popular option not too far from the stadium is Chano's Drive-In. As you exit the stadium, you'll see many students lining up for a bite to eat. They offer a variety of Mexican foods along with some American options. Burritos, nachos, carne asada fries, tacos, tortas, green chili, burgers, and hot dogs are just a few items that you can find on the menu.



Another name you commonly hear from the USC fans is La Taquiza. The claim to fame here is the mulita (similar to a quesadilla - two handmade tortillas with cheese/meat and guacamole). Everything on the menu here is under $10, so you can try the tacos and mulitas at a reasonable price.



A popular Mexican establishment to consider would be El Cholo. Food Network host Rachel Ray has stated that El Cholo does have the best tacos in LA, although that could be debated. The worst seat in the house is affectionately referred to as the Nacho Table because they compensate you for the bad seats with free nachos. Don't forget to try the margaritas as many say that they are the best around!



If Mexican isn't your thing, maybe you should consider Papa Cristos. Here, you'll find some of the best Greek food in all of Los Angeles. With the owner Papa Cristos often in attendance and overseeing the operations, you can get great Greek specialties including lamb, sandwiches, and salad.



One of the Los Angeles food landmarks includes The Pantry or Cafe Pantry. The college students love this because they can get hearty meals 24 hours a day. In fact, they could have asked for a meal at pretty much any time over the past 88 years with the exception of one day (I'll let you do your own research on why it was closed that one day). Give yourself some time to check this place out as the lines often spill outside of the building and around the block. Please note however that this is a cash-only establishment

.

If you don't mind traveling a few miles from the Coliseum, I would also suggest trying out Philippe's French Dip. I'm a sucker for tourist spots, so when this place claimed to have invented the french dip, I had to try it. This french dip is probably a bit different from many that you have tried because they serve this "wet", or dipped in the beat juices before it is served to you.



Many USC students will tell you to try the 901 Club (or "the 9-0") on Figeroa Street as it was named as Playboy magazine's "college bar of the month" in June of 2002. Here, you'll find 12 or more beers on tap, nine 50 inch plasma televisions. Some of the foods you can try here include the corn-flake crusted chicken fingers, waffle fries, and a double chili burger.



Finally, there is the spot known as Traditions. Founded in 1987, it was a favorite of USC as the only on-campus bar until it was closed in 2008 due to some campus renovations. In 2010, it reopened at the new Campus Center and has been just as successful as the first edition. With everything on-hand from sofas to margarita pitchers to a performing stage, even the underage fans can gain admission here as those over 21 wear a wristband to get their beverages. One of the more popular items here includes the "Trojan Tea" (version of the Long Island Iced Tea) for $8.00.

Fans    4

The USC fans clearly carry a chip on their shoulders from all of the aforementioned success. It really creates some great banter with all of the opposing fans. Let's face it, these "villains" of sport make the game much, much better.



USC attendance figures lead the Pac-12 with an average attendance nearly 20,000 greater than second best. This is particularly impressive in a major metropolitan market with many alternative forms of entertainment.

The one thing that is left to be desired was the amount of chanting that goes on in the stadium. Beyond the "V" sign and the typical "ooooo" chant, there wasn't much else exclusive to the fans. I would have loved to see the 4 corners of the stadium chanting "U," "S," "C," "Trojans," or something to that effect. They managed to keep the stadium loud and the atmosphere intense, but really lacked identity beyond some of the traditions with the mascot.

Access    4

The Coliseum is about three miles southwest of downtown Los Angeles and adjacent to the campus. The stadium is most easily reached from the 10 or the 110, which unfortunately have some of the most congested traffic in the area. The good news is that if you can beat the traffic, Interstate 5, LAX airport, Interstate 405, or the beach cities are not far away.



There is not a single large parking lot, but rather multiple satellite lots (with 20,000 spaces) that are typically priced based on proximity to the stadium. Most spots go for $20-$25, Keep in mind that sometimes the reward of saving $10 is much less than the risk of your car incurring some damage upon your return; so choose your lot wisely.



If you're taking the Metro, take any one of the routes to Union Station and connect to the bus service. Visit the Metro's site for more details. Once inside the stadium, you'll find a spacious lower concourse. If your seats are on the upper level, expect some rather intimidating inclines. The restrooms are plentiful and despite the stadium being at near capacity for many of the games I attended, the lines moved along quickly.

Return on Investment    5

Due to the large following that USC has garnered over the years, it seems that most seats go for the flat fee of $55.00. Of course for the annual premier games (Notre Dame or UCLA), you'll be challenged to find these tickets for under $75.00. 

Your parking fee is contingent on your efforts in finding inexpensive parking, but likely to start at $20 and rise closer to the start of the game. For these fees, you're likely to see an almost-full stadium of atmosphere and some of the best talent in division one football on several Saturdays during the fall. As the Pac-12 continues to become more formidable in the NCAA football landscape, fans can watch the Trojans take on notable opponents such as Stanford, Oregon, and Notre Dame.

 Regardless of the opponent, you'll witness one of the best experiences in college football. Make a day of it to check out the campus or the surrounding neighborhood, and it will be a day well spent.

Extras    5

During your visit to the stadium, be sure to walk by the arches and check out the "Court of Honor." This memorial has many plaques to recognize the events or achievements that have occurred at the stadium. Notable names such as Daniel Reeves, Jesse Owens, Pope John Paul II, Jackie Robinson, John Wooden, and Jerry West all hold a place in the Court.



If the Olympic rings and arches weren't enough, check out the "Olympic Gateway" in front of the Coliseum. Created in 1984 by Robert Graham, this structure rises 25 feet above ground and has headless male and female bodies made of bronze.



The first few times I drove along the 110, I looked up and saw the sign for the Coliseum and laughed. The LED screen and design are more than a little outdated. As time went on, I began to appreciate the sign more and more for remaining original in such a modern city. 

I just can't get enough of the traditions. Football announcer Peter Arbogast coined the phrase "Perfect Day" for any day that the Trojans win and both rivals, UCLA and Notre Dame lose on the same day.



Rivalry games create great atmosphere (and unfortunately high ticket prices) at the Coliseum. The annual game with Notre Dame is for the Jeweled Shillelagh. The two teams combined have more national championship teams, Heisman Trophy winners, and All-Americans than any other college football matchup. Since 1926, the two have met every year.



Let's not forget the Pac-12 rivarly with the team that is only 10 miles away in UCLA. These two teams are the only two programs in the BCS that share a major city. UCLA even played in the Coliseum until 1982, when they moved to the Rose Bowl. Every year, the two play each other for the Victory Bell. Beyond just the tangible award, this game is for Los Angeles bragging rights.



A more interesting tradition that may not be so well-known is the #55. Typically, the number cannot be selected by any player, but rather assigned by the coach. If a player is fortunate enough to be named #55, he better represent it well as he is in some good company. Keith Rivers, Markus Steele, Junior Seau, Chris Claiborne, and Willie McGinest are some of the more notable players to don the number.




Many other notable events have taken place at the Coliseum, including the 1959 World Series. The crowd on hand for Game 3 of this series (92,706) is still the largest World Series attendance to date. It's rather mind-boggling that there is also a baseball layout for the stadium. Prior to moving in to Dodger Stadium, the Dodgers called the Coliseum home for four years. The baseball layout here actually set a Guinness World Record for attendance at a baseball game between the Boston Red Sox and Los Angeles Dodgers with 115,300 fans (2008).

Not to be overshadowed by the MLB, the NFL also spent some time in the Coliseum as well. The Los Angeles Rams played here from 1946 through 1979 and the Raiders from 1982 through 1994. Other professional football factions include the AFL's Los Angeles Chargers (1960), the USFL's Los Angeles Express (1983-1985), and the XFL's Los Angeles Extreme (2001). Some of the biggest stages also graced the Coliseum, including the NFL Pro Bowl (1951-1972 and in 1979) and two Super Bowls (1967 & 1973). 

In 2009, the Los Angeles Lakers used the Coliseum as the culmination of their championship parade. Only a venue such as the Coliseum could hold 90,000 Lakers fans. The area around the arches was decorated in purple and gold and the court was brought from the Staples Center and set up .

The Coliseum is the only stadium to ever host two separate Olympic Games (1932 & 1984). As a result, the State of California and the United States Government declared the Coliseum a State and Federal Historical Landmark. It's a pretty fair bet that the stadium will hold this honor into eternity. With all of the money that international cities are throwing at new venues to lure the Olympics, it's doubtful that the same city will ever host again, let alone in the same stadium.



The Coliseum has also experienced its taste of Hollywood. The stadium has appeared in movies "Forest Gump" and "The Naked Gun" as well as television shows such as "Glee," "American Idol," "Scrubs," "How I Met Your Mother," "LA Law," and "Good Morning America." The USC band recorded the title track on Fleetwood Mac's 1970 album "Tusk."

This venue has been there for many other historic events as well. John F. Kennedy gave his acceptance speech at the 1960 Democratic Convention and first coined his phrase "New Frontier." In 1973, Evel Knievel used the entire length of the stadium to jump 50 stacked cars on ABC's Wide World of Sports.

Final Thoughts

Despite being one of the oldest facilities in college football, it appears that the Coliseum still has many more chapters to be written. Now that the University of Southern California controls the facility, what changes are ahead? Certainly the school will look to enhance the facility to increase revenue, but will the enhancements come at the expense of the average ticketholder? Naming rights, modernized concessions, and luxury suites are just a few possible changes on the horizon. Fans and local residents alike will look forward to what's ahead.

Follow Drew's Travels Through Southern California on Twitter.

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Crowd Reviews

The Men of Troy

Total Score: 4.43

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

There are few programs in college football that can draw the ire of opposing fans nationwide. Not just fans from within the conference, but also from fans that rarely see Pac 10 Conference football. Winning will do that for a program.

The University of Southern California Trojans have a track record of unprecedented success and as a result, leave many of the competitors in awe. Annually, every team yearns to play in the Rose Bowl. USC has played in 33 and won 24, with the next most appearances by a school being "only" 20. Pardon them if they dislike losing, after all they've only had three losing seasons since 1961. The success of their program translates into the professional level as well, as the school has produced more first round NFL draft picks than anyone.

The school first fielded football team in back in 1888, and were even referred to as the "Wesleyans" and the "Methodists" for periods of time. In 1912, the nickname of "Trojans" was adopted and has been embraced ever since.

The Coliseum was opened in 1923 at a construction cost of approximately $954,873, and since then, the Trojans have called The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum their home. The stadium has been affectionately nicknamed "The Grand Old Lady" due to its prestige and age. The stadium has recently named one of the 40 best venues to experience college football by the Sporting News. With a capacity of over 93,000, there's ample opportunity for any fan to take in a game at this historic venue.

Due to its age, the stadium has undergone many renovations through over the years. In 1993, the stadium was given a $15 million renovation, but in 1994 the area experienced an earthquake that would cause damages that would require an additional $93 million in repairs. 1995 marked the trifecta of consecutive years with substantial investment into the stadium as a new press-box was constructed. Most recently in 2008, a new high-definition LED video-board & sound system were installed to give the stadium an injection of modern technology.

There are a few things that you must take part in prior to entering the stadium. First, and most importantly, you must visit the iconic statue of Tommy Trojan near the bookstore. Built in 1930, this statue takes its place in thousands of photographs on gameday.

Bask in some USC history during your stop at Heritage Hall, which is located at the center of campus. This 3 story building is home to the many honors that the university and athletes have received. You'll find photos and banners of NCAA championships, Heisman trophies, a bust of John Wayne, as well as plaques of many other honors.

As you walk down Trousdale towards the stadium, keep an eye out for the set of flag poles. In fact, you don't even need to keep an eye out, just keep listening. You'll hear the dinging sound of fans kicking the USC flag poles for good luck. Just keep in mind that the intensity with which you kick does not increase or decrease the "good luck," so let's not cause ourselves any foot injuries.

The Men of Troy-Part 2

Total Score: 4.14

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

There are few programs in college football that can draw the ire of opposing fans nationwide. Not just fans from within the conference, but also from fans that rarely see Pac 12 Conference football. Winning will do that for a program.

The University of Southern California Trojans have had a track record of unprecedented success and as a result, leave many of the competitors in awe. Annually, every team yearns to play in the Rose Bowl. USC has played in 33 and won 24, with the next most appearances by a school being "only" 20. Pardon them if they dislike losing, after all they've only had three losing seasons since 1961. The success of their program translates into the professional level as well, as the school has produced more first round NFL draft picks than anyone.

The school first fielded football team back in 1888, and were even referred to as the "Wesleyans" and the "Methodists" for periods of time. In 1912, the nickname of "Trojans" was adopted and has been embraced ever since.

The Coliseum was opened in 1923 at a construction cost of approximately $954,873, and since then, the Trojans have called The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum their home. Conversely, the Trojan basketball team plays at the modern Galen Center, a venue that has been open less than 10 years.

The stadium has been affectionately nicknamed "The Grand Old Lady" due to its prestige and age. The stadium has recently been named one of the 40 best venues to experience college football by the Sporting News. With a capacity of over 93,000, there's ample opportunity for any fan to take in a game at this historic venue.

Due to its age, the stadium has undergone many renovations throughout the years. In 1993, the stadium was given a $15 million renovation, but in 1994 the area experienced an earthquake that would cause damages that would require an additional $93 million in repairs. 1995 marked the trifecta of consecutive years with substantial investment into the stadium as a new press-box was constructed.

Most recently, for the 2011 season, a new scoreboard was installed on the west end of the stadium. It definitely cannot be missed once setting foot inside the stadium, and can even be seen clearly from outside of the east end of the stadium. The height is 40 feet and the length is 150 feet long. Its resolution of 792 pixels high definitely stands out as the modern amenity of the stadium.

There are a few things that you must take part in prior to entering the stadium. First, and most importantly, you must visit the iconic statue of Tommy Trojan near the bookstore. Built in 1930, this statue takes its place in thousands of photographs on gameday.

Bask in some USC history during your stop at Heritage Hall, which is located at the center of campus. This 3 story building is home to the many honors that the university and athletes have received. You'll find photos and banners of NCAA championships, Heisman trophies, a bust of John Wayne, as well as plaques of many other honors.

As you walk down Trousdale towards the stadium, keep an eye out for the set of flag poles. In fact, you don't even need to keep an eye out, just keep listening. You'll hear the dinging sound of fans kicking the USC flag poles for good luck. Just keep in mind that the intensity with which you kick does not increase or decrease the "good luck," so let's not cause ourselves any foot injuries.

Love the Old Grey Lady

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

I've probably been to the Coliseum more than any other stadium and she gets a lot of flack from people that haven't been there or haven't been back in a while. They have really made a lot of improvements in the last 10 years with more and better food, and facilities. It has some bad seating areas, both corners (Sec 1 & 28) next to the peristyle, but the atmosphere can't be beat. Get there early and tailgate on campus or in the parking lot and make a day of it. It really is a great place to see a game.

FIGHT ON

Total Score: 4.29

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

There are few programs in college football that can draw the ire of opposing fans nationwide. Not just fans from within the conference, but also from fans that rarely see Pac 12 Conference football. Winning will do that for a program.



The University of Southern California Trojans have had a track record of unprecedented success and as a result, leave many of the competitors in awe. Annually, every team yearns to play in the Rose Bowl. USC has played in 33 and won 24, with the next most appearances by a school being "only" 20. Pardon them if they dislike losing, after all they've only had three losing seasons since 1961. The success of their program translates into the professional level as well, as the school has produced more first round NFL draft picks than anyone.



The school first fielded a football team back in 1888, and were even referred to as the "Wesleyans" and the "Methodists" for periods of time. In 1912, the nickname of "Trojans" was adopted and has been embraced ever since.



The Coliseum was opened in 1923 at a construction cost of approximately $954,873, and since then, the Trojans have called The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum their home. Conversely, the Trojan basketball team plays at the modern Galen Center, a venue that has been open less than 10 years.



The stadium has been affectionately nicknamed "The Grand Old Lady" due to its prestige and age. With a capacity of over 93,000, there's ample opportunity for any fan to take in a game at this historic venue.

 Due to its age, the stadium has undergone many renovations throughout the years.

There are a few things that you must take part in prior to entering the stadium. First, and most importantly, you must visit the iconic statue of Tommy Trojan near the bookstore. Built in 1930, this statue takes its place in thousands of photographs on gameday.



Bask in some USC history during your stop at Heritage Hall, which is located at the center of campus. This 3 story building is home to the many honors that the university and athletes have received. You'll find photos and banners of NCAA championships, Heisman trophies, a bust of John Wayne, as well as plaques of many other honors.



As you walk down Trousdale towards the stadium, keep an eye out for the set of flag poles. In fact, you don't even need to keep an eye out, just keep listening. You'll hear the dinging sound of fans kicking the USC flag poles for good luck. Just keep in mind that the intensity with which you kick does not increase or decrease the "good luck," so let's not cause ourselves any foot injuries.

FIGHT ON

Total Score: 4.29

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

There are few programs in college football that can draw the ire of opposing fans nationwide. Not just fans from within the conference, but also from fans that rarely see Pac 12 Conference football. Winning will do that for a program.



The University of Southern California Trojans have had a track record of unprecedented success and as a result, leave many of the competitors in awe. Annually, every team yearns to play in the Rose Bowl. USC has played in 33 and won 24, with the next most appearances by a school being "only" 20. Pardon them if they dislike losing, after all they've only had three losing seasons since 1961. The success of their program translates into the professional level as well, as the school has produced more first round NFL draft picks than anyone.



The school first fielded a football team back in 1888, and were even referred to as the "Wesleyans" and the "Methodists" for periods of time. In 1912, the nickname of "Trojans" was adopted and has been embraced ever since.



The Coliseum was opened in 1923 at a construction cost of approximately $954,873, and since then, the Trojans have called The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum their home. Conversely, the Trojan basketball team plays at the modern Galen Center, a venue that has been open less than 10 years.



The stadium has been affectionately nicknamed "The Grand Old Lady" due to its prestige and age. With a capacity of over 93,000, there's ample opportunity for any fan to take in a game at this historic venue.

 Due to its age, the stadium has undergone many renovations throughout the years.

There are a few things that you must take part in prior to entering the stadium. First, and most importantly, you must visit the iconic statue of Tommy Trojan near the bookstore. Built in 1930, this statue takes its place in thousands of photographs on gameday.



Bask in some USC history during your stop at Heritage Hall, which is located at the center of campus. This 3 story building is home to the many honors that the university and athletes have received. You'll find photos and banners of NCAA championships, Heisman trophies, a bust of John Wayne, as well as plaques of many other honors.



As you walk down Trousdale towards the stadium, keep an eye out for the set of flag poles. In fact, you don't even need to keep an eye out, just keep listening. You'll hear the dinging sound of fans kicking the USC flag poles for good luck. Just keep in mind that the intensity with which you kick does not increase or decrease the "good luck," so let's not cause ourselves any foot injuries.

It's the LA Coliseum!

Total Score: 3.86

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

While I like football and football stadiums, they aren't my passion. Despite that, the LA Coliseum was one of my top 5 "must visit" stadiums for years. So, when my Syracuse Orange scheduled a game out there, I didn't even have to think twice before booking a cross-country flight from my home in Washington, DC.

I've only attended one game here, so I can't claim to be an expert. But, as a stadium collector who has attended games at well over 100 venues, I can tell you that the LA Coliseum was everything you'd expect and more. The things that struck me:

--The crowd in the city. LA's traffic is notorious, and I had heard about how it becomes simply apocalyptic on USC game days. I found that slightly exaggerated. In any case, once our car was parked, it was hard to believe we were in LA--it felt like we were in the midwest. The fans and the tailgate scene were wonderful and full of hospitality in a way that you don't expect in a major city.

--The Entrance. When you think of iconic sports venues, certain places immediately come to mind. The Green Monster. The ivy at Wrigley. The Twin Spires of Churchill Downs. The roof at MSG. Maybe it's just my East Coast bias, but I feel like the LA Coliseum gets overlooked here. It doesn't deserve to be. When you look up and see the columns and the Olympic cauldron, you know you're somewhere special. The history is palpable. That's the real draw for me; I've always loved timeless places, and this is one of the best. And even if it weren't, USC is a solid program with a great game presentation. And the seats all seemed to be comfortable and have good views.

One of my favorites.

Fun, laid back

Total Score: 4.14

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

Crazy to be driving through the hood and then suddenly be in this gated, beautiful campus. Traditions is one of the best college bars I have ever been to.

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