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AT&T Park

San Francisco, CA

Home of the San Francisco Giants

4.7

4.2

AT&T Park (map it)
24 Willie Mays Plaza
San Francisco, CA 94107


San Francisco Giants website

AT&T Park website

Year Opened: 2000

Capacity: 41,503

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I Left My Bat in San Francisco

After the baseball Giants of New York migrated west in 1957, they eventually settled in the wind swept saucer known as Candlestick Park located halfway between downtown San Francisco and SFO Airport on the Bay. The Giant fans called it "The Stick" as it was known by the locals for four decades. Some say that Hall of Famer and former Giant great Willie "The Say Hey Kid" Mays would have broken Babe Ruth's homerun record first if not for the wind blowing lunar shots back in the old park. In 2000, the Giants entered the season in a brand new gem of a venue in downtown San Francisco on the water. The stadium was originally called Pac Bell Park, then SBC and finally AT&T, after the latter acquired the former entities.

The Giants reside in the National League West Division today. They were formed as a team in 1883 and played in the famed Polo Fields before their wagon train rambled out west. Since the Giants have taken up residency in the “T,” they have participated in four World Series, winning three in the last six seasons. This was after having won their last one when they were on the East Coast over 50 years ago.

AT&T Park was also home to a college football bowl game for 11 years as well as the Cal Bears the year their football stadium was being renovated. The flash in the pan league “UFL” had a team play in the park back in 2001. The park is also used for concerts.

4.7

What is FANFARE?

The FANFARE scale is our metric device for rating each stadium experience. It covers the following:

  • Food & Beverage
  • Atmosphere
  • Neighborhood
  • Fans
  • Access
  • Return on Investment
  • Extras

Each area is rated from 0 to 5 stars with 5 being the best. The overall composite score is the "FANFARE Score".

Food & Beverage    5

AT&T has the most robust assortment of food and drinks I have ever seen at any sporting venue.

As far as food goes, there is of course the traditional fare found throughout the stadium at multiple counters, but more impressive is the variety of unique kinds of food stands, serving BBQ, seafood, donuts, ethnic and local fare. One of the items you will smell the aroma of throughout the stadium is garlic fries. To my recollection, AT&T Park either originated or perfected the garlic fry thing at a sporting event. After the game outside the park, you will find the grilled hot dog carts every 10 steps. An excellent way to end a great outing.

The stadium offers wine bars, Irish coffee houses and more beers than one can shake a stick at. In the club level there are several cocktail areas with bar selections equal to any hipster establishment in the Mission District of the city. Of course this is a Coca-Cola affiliated park, so all Coke products are offered.

It is so hard to recommend any one thing so I would suggest you find your favorite beer (it's probably there). As for protein, either ethnic fare or something from the crab shack are infallible options.

Atmosphere    5

Giant fans are passionate and have found a reinvigorated love for their team since they moved to this cathedral sixteen seasons ago. For the most part they are knowledgeable, passionate and loyal.

The setting is as spectacular as any venue for any sport. Most would agree that AT&T is in a rare category along with Camden Yard in Baltimore as the two most incredible modern stadiums. Its advantage over Camden is its physical location. The cozy 42,000 seat cathedral is nestled up against the basin and next to a newly gentrified area of the city that was once taboo to enter. From above, the stadium appears to sink below the ground and resemble a bowl below water level. The lawn is always immaculately manicured and maintains a brilliant green glow to it.

There really is not a bad seat in the house. My favorite area for day games is in the left or center field bleachers. For evening games, the lower level along the first base line provides great views and protection from the wind. For an amazing experience, get tickets for when the Dodgers pay a visit to the City by the Bay.

The stadium announcer, Rene Brooks-Moon, a former local radio personality fires up the fans throughout the contest. You'd better stand during the seventh inning stretch and sing loud and proud. Additional action to keep the fans engaged include Jumbotron dance offs, kiss cams, shirt tossing and mascot pics.

Neighborhood    5

Formally known as the China Basin warehouse district, the area went through a rebirth with the arrival of the ballpark including million dollar plus high rise flats, restaurants from the high end down as well as the famous dive bars.

Momo's, Lucky Strike, Polo Grounds, Hi Dive, Red's Coffee House are a few of the nearby options. Momo's is the chic "seen or be seen" hangout before, after and for some of us, during the game. With a cozy outdoor area serving libations, the atmosphere of the ballpark 'hood comes to life. For a great dive bar experience, look no further than Hi Dive, a mere few steps from the monstrous Bay Bridge. If you are looking to carb and protein it up before the national anthem, head over to Lucky Strike for their famous club sandwich with a fried egg on top. This is also a great place to have a group outing on game day and knock down some pins in their full size bowling alley in the back. Across the side street, you can imbibe on a few Bloody Mary's or a pint of properly poured stout at the old school environs of The Polo Grounds. They also make a mean burger.

The stadium is right off the Embarcadero which is a great place to stroll and take in the awesome views the bay provides of Treasure Island, Angel Island and of course, Alcatraz. The Ferry Building is about one mile from the park and offers an array of restaurants and shopping for tourists. Further down the Embarcadero is the famous Pier 39 and Ghiradelli Square. Of course no trip to the city is complete without taking selfies in front of the Haight and Ashbury intersection (Ground zero for the hippy movement), Lombard Street and the Golden Gate Bridge.

Lodging depends on your preference and budget and proximity to the park. San Francisco has everything from the five star Fairmont Hotel and Mark Hopkins, as well as all the major chains down to gunshot motels. If your budget is limitless, stay at the Fairmont. For mid range, the Marriott at Moscone or the Hyatt at Market are great options. This is not a cheap city by any means.

Fans    4

I find Giants fans loyal and knowledgeable for the most part. Many of the long-time fans will spout off full rosters from years past as I can still do with my Baltimore Orioles. When the Dodgers are in town, the stadium takes on a whole other level of excitement, pageantry and noise. This is not a friendly rivalry as recent events have reminded us, however it is entertaining. Nonetheless, there are plenty of people who show up knowing nothing about the Giants or baseball but they look good wearing the colors and getting "Insta-worthy" pics to make their friends envious.

In my experience most games are pretty packed. When the Dodgers or A's play here, the tickets are impossible to get. This adds to the game day atmosphere in a positive way. it is rare when you see many empty seats at AT&T.

When the Giants do something well, the stadium erupts like Mount Vesuvius. Fans are very engaged and for the most part respectful of the opponent and umpires. My only gripe about Giants fans is they, along with most west coast sports fans, do not understand that they should be seated during live action. They should not be blocking my view to go get refreshments, take selfies or wave to their friends in section 118 while talking to them on their Iphone. This must be an east coast/midwest unwritten rule.

Access    4

This is a downtown park. So with that can come the frustrations of city traffic and congestion depending on the start time of the game.

If you are coming from the East Bay or mid-peninsula, BART is the easiest form of transportation with two stations within walking distance, or a quick transfer on the Muni that will drop you off park side. Driving from the East Bay you can become victim of whatever the bridge situation may hold. From the city, best to Uber or walk depending on your starting point.

There are plenty of parking lots ranging from $25 -$50. Or you can chance it and park on the street and feed the meter for a period of time. Smash and grabs are all the rage these days in Otis Redding's inspirational village, so I would recommend a lot with humanoids providing surveillance during the game.

There are three main entrances into the stadium with very little wait time unless you procrastinate and wait to enter until right before the ceremonial first pitch. Security is fast and efficient. This is not their first rodeo.

The main concourse is usually fine to move around in. However, when you go to the promenade area behind the outfield it can be very congested with kids lining up for the slides or the general bottleneck behind the left field bleachers.

Return on Investment    5

Simply put, the fans win. Regardless of whether you paid $22 for nose bleeds or $240 for club levels cushions, you will experience an amazing facility with a consistent product on the field. The breathtaking views whether day or night are unparalleled in MLB.

Tickets range from $22 up to $240, parking $20 -$50, food and drink depends on your appetite and tastes. Plan on at least $100 per person all things considered for the game.

Extras    5

Coke slide, kid's park, McCovey Cove - I have spent numerous games when my kids were younger standing in line with them and missing three innings while we waited to go down the mega slide behind the left field bleachers disguised as a gargantuan coke bottle next to the supersized glove. If missing three innings is not enough you can then take the little ones to the whiffle ball park right next to the slide and stand in another line and miss another inning or two to watch your little tyke put some plastic on plastic and run the bases. Let's also pay homage to Bonds Cove, err McCovey Cove as it is known. This is the body of water beyond right field where kayakers eagerly awaited Bonds' "roid induced" splash bombs in his chase to dishonorably dethrone the real king, Hank Aaron.

Old Navy has naming rights to the area inside the park in front of the cove and it is called the Splash Zone. There are also the peep holes in left-center that allows you to peer into the stadium from the sidewalk in front of McCovey Cove and catch some game action gratis. Make sure you walk around the concourse behind the outfield to take in all the incredible views. For some Giants history, there are statues out front of the greats from the past to pay homage to.

Dan's extras - Game day programs are always done expertly with interesting feature stories, statistics and glossy pictures. If you collect game day programs bring a baggie to keep it free from beverage or food spills throughout the game. If you are a visitor from out of town, this is a ticket you will want to save and share with your kids and grandkids so you can brag that you were once here.

Final Thoughts

Nothing beats sitting in the park for an afternoon game with sunny skies and warm weather, tossing back a cold one and cracking open peanut shells. However, if you go at night, I will remind you that this is San Francisco where Mark Twain quipped, "The coldest winter I have experienced was a summer in San Francisco." Thus, bring a jacket and perhaps a hat for the follicly challenged. It's always fun to stay after the game with the seagulls and listen to Tony Bennett's, "I left my heart in San Francisco" being piped in. For all true baseball fans, this is bucket list worthy along with Fenway, Wrigley and Camden. AT&T Park will not dissipate from your memory as time marches on, as it will leave a lasting impression.

Nice review Andrew. My one addition to new visitors to AT&T would be to not miss out on the Cha Cha

Nice review Andrew. My one addition to new visitors to AT&T would be to not miss out on the Cha Cha Bowl from Orlando's Carribean BBQ located in center field. A unique ballpark item - black beans, rice, your choice of meat, and excellent salsa.

by jonah | Apr 21, 2010 08:28 AM

I think that AT&T is a great place, with a lot of unique things (like McCovey Cove), in a great neig

I think that AT&T is a great place, with a lot of unique things (like McCovey Cove), in a great neighborhood, and some of the best food in baseball. But does anyone else feel like that giant Coke bottle out in left center field is an annoying eyesore?

by paul | Jun 16, 2010 04:43 AM

I haven\'t been to many MLB stadiums (Angel Stadium, Dodger Stadium and AT&T Park) but the latter is

I haven't been to many MLB stadiums (Angel Stadium, Dodger Stadium and AT&T Park) but the latter is the best I have visited by far. The banners outside on the street level give a bit of a Yawkey Way feel (I can only tell from pictures that I have seen). The inside of the stadium is great. Not that big but some nice quirks in the outfield wall. At least this former NY team does honour it's NY roots by naming some of the NY players as well (unlike the other Californian team that came from the NY area). I like the giant Coke bottle in left field. It gives a nice touch to the ballpark.

by yankeebiscuitfan | Sep 16, 2010 09:59 AM

AT&T Park

I haven't been to many MLB stadiums so far, but AT&T Park was one of them. It was the best looking MLB ballpark I have been to so far. The Giants fans are very lucky to have a home like this.

by yankeebiscuitfan | Jun 19, 2011 06:56 AM

Yikes!

I was going by the park the other day and saw a 4 different parking garages advertising their lots for $60! Like I said in the review, parking provided by AT&T Park is $30 but there are a limited number of spots. Parking in the neighboring lots are usually cheaper ($15-25). There may have been another event going on in the area besides the game as the price was double what I last saw. Who knows? Just another reason to take public transportation the yard.

by ryannorris | Jun 25, 2011 10:28 AM

Beautiful Park but what a MESS!!!

I recently attended a 3 game series at AT&T Park this was the 11 different MLB Park that we have visited. The facility itself was like stepping into a postcard. The View from your seats was everything that has been advertised but the good experience seemed to end there!!

Moving around inside the park was a NIGHMARE!! The walkways all around the field are way too small to handle any crowd at all. They were appox. 10 feet more narrow than most parks. This was by far the worst Stadium for fan movement that we have been too, for example it too us 45 min to get out of the park at the end of the game. People were shoulder to shoulder and not moving because the walkways were jammed. At the beginning of the game they give emergency evacuation procedures. They might as well throw them out the window unless they give an hour warning before the Earthquake or other disaster hits There should also be double the amount of toilets that there are the lines at the bathrooms were CRAZY!!

What is the deal with NO VENDERS? Yes, there was the occasional Cherro (however you spell it). But it was very rare to see any other vendors at all, even Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, and NEW YORK Sell beer with vendors. No Dogs Either. This just forced you to go back and fight the crowds shoulder to shoulder through the narrow halls.

The worst part were the ushers!! The game was over and they were in your face telling you that you had to leave. They said they had to let the seagulls in to clean or something. Where were you supposed to go? Back into the Hurd of people waiting to get to the crowded stairways and ramps to inch your way to freedom out of that Hell Hole!!

Needless to say ONE Visit was more that Enough!! I just hope that another 1989 World Series game never happens again because if it does I really fear for those people. I am Just glad to say that I won't be there.

If you are a Fan Make one visit and mark it off your list. Spend the rest of your time in San Fran at the Warf or Alcatraz they were much nicer!!

by MLBFAN | Jul 16, 2011 11:55 PM

Great time

I have been to only 6 MLB stadiums, but this one was by far the most picturesqe. We spent a lot of time there during a Sunday day game. Walk around the outside to find all sorts of history. Make a circle through the inside of the park to look at all the different views. Behind scoreboard is like a central market of food and drink choices. The concourse is narrow but not unmanagable, but don't think that you can enter the gates and get to your sets in a minute or two if first pitch is close. I thought it was kind of funny to see the seagulls go wild after the stadium bleachers clear out (a feast for them I guess). Overall it was my favorite to visit, so easy to get to with public trans, and good 1st level seats weren't more than $50 or so. Would definately go back.

by mitch1674 | Mar 01, 2013 04:24 PM

Vendors

PS I actually loved it that there were no beer vendors to get in my way and obstruct the view or screaming about "beer here!". I mostly go to Miller Park and US Cellular where the vendors are constantly in my face or standing in my view of the plate. If you want a beer every inning, go to a bar.

by mitch1674 | Mar 01, 2013 04:27 PM

Bull pens

I saw a game there two summers ago, on a USA trip, and loved it (even if the Giants were shut-out). However, the idea of having the "bull pens" in foul territory, with balls coming at the players, really seemed strange.

by Freddy Lubin | Jun 18, 2016 06:40 AM

Thorough and Informative

Thanks for a great in-depth review of AT&T Park and the surrounding area - it's almost like you lived in the neighborhood. For those who have not visited, do pay close attention to Dan's "bring a jacket" advise.

by BobHora | Jul 12, 2016 01:48 PM

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Crowd Reviews

San Francisco Giants at AT&T Park

Total Score: 4.43

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 5

The Giants moved from blistering Candlestick Park five miles north to their new penthouse at 3rd and King Streets in downtown San Francisco for the start of the 2000 season. AT&T Park immediately became an icon in the baseball park landscape and paved the way for the renaissance of new parks in the early 2000's.

The brick exterior makes for an old-timey, aesthetically pleasing monument to San Francisco baseball fifty years in the making. One of the few items to make the trip up to King Street is the old foghorn played loudly and proudly after every Giants homerun, a perfect Ode to San Francisco.

At just under 42,000 seats, AT&T Park has a much more intimate feel than the football stadium they played in prior to their move. Seats along the first and third baselines are closer than they had been before and the short porch in right field allows fans a close look from any angle. Just beyond the aforementioned right field wall is McCovey Cove, an inlet of the San Francisco Bay that has seen dozens of homerun balls splash down after a serious poke from a certain burly left-handed hitter.

With the move to the new park came a recommitment to Giants history, both New York and San Francisco. Plaques along the exterior of the park facing King Street represent the Giants Wall of Fame. Requirements to be immortalized are eight years with the club or five and at least one all-star appearance.

World Series Champion flags fly high above the clock in center field representing the New York championships from decades ago. Alongside now is a bright orange banner from last year representing the sole San Francisco championship.

At the three main corners of the ballpark are statues representing the San Francisco Hall-of-Famers. Orlando Cepeda claims 2nd and King, Juan Marichal's high leg-kick can be seen along 3rd Street at the Lefty O'Doul Gate and Willie Mays has his own plaza (the ballpark's address is 24 Willie Mays Plaza) front and center at the main entrance. Right across the cove you can find Willie McCovey looking over his namesake.

A Giant Gem- AT&T Park

Total Score: 4.43

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

The only bad day (or night) at AT&T Park is one where the home team gets annihilated. If the San Francisco Giants are in the game, forget about where you're sitting or who's playing or what season it is. To prove it, I chose a meaningless game in late September against the vanilla Arizona Diamondbacks for my visit.

Arguably Pac Bellâ?¦sorryâ?¦AT&T Park's best feature is that the entire thing is accessible with the price of any ticket unless you're talking about the real rarefied seating areas. Of course, it had to be that way given the volume of sensory input.

A simple walk around the concourse is anything but simple.

There is a dizzying array of foodâ??everything from garlic fries to crab sandwiches to standard ballpark franks and even a selection of California. There are a plethora of options to keep youngsters busy behind the leftfield bleachersâ??a mini-diamond for actual use, the huge Coke bottle slide, and an arcade though this I've never seen. Furthermore, the water cannons following splash hits are always good for an ooh or ah.

For those adults who've been dragged to the stadium, the whole thing is one huge wireless hotspot so you can hop online.

However, the best is saved for those in the audience who are there for the beautiful game.

There aren't any bad seatsâ??the lower boxes are excellent, the skyboxes are as luxurious as you'd imagine (fine catered food, good wine, better beer, HD televisions inside and out for a closer look or should the mild NorCal climate take a turn, etc.), and the upper deck hangs over the action for a better-than-it-should-be perspective. Plus, the higher up you go, the more the lovely San Francisco Bay stretches out as the backdrop.

A Great Park

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

I attended a game at AT&T back in 2002, and was lucky to be able to catch Greg Maddux as the opposing pitcher. I was there for my first anniversary with my wife (who was still bringing books to baseball games at the time). What I remember most is the amazing food that the ballpark has to offer, and the accompanying smells.

We sat in the upper deck in the first row abou teven with third base, and it felt further away than some upper deck experiences at other ballparks. While, I can't say that I'm a huge fan of the giant coke bottle in left center field, I do like McCovey Cove, and the great tribute statue to Willie Mays outside. San Francisco (besides the hills) can be a very walkable city, and the area around the ballpark was no exception. I am really looking forward to a return trip to AT&T Park sometime soon.

What a Mess

Total Score: 2.00

  • Food & Beverage: 1
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 0
  • RoI: 1
  • Extras: 1

I recently attended a 3 game series at AT&T Park this was the 11 different MLB Park that we have visited. The facility itself was like stepping into a postcard. The View from your seats was everything that has been advertised but the good experience seemed to end there!!

Moving around inside the park was a NIGHMARE!! The walkways all around the field are way too small to handle any crowd at all. They were appox. 10 feet more narrow than most parks. This was by far the worst Stadium for fan movement that we have been too, for example it too us 45 min to get out of the park at the end of the game. People were shoulder to shoulder and not moving because the walkways were jammed. At the beginning of the game they give emergency evacuation procedures. They might as well throw them out the window unless they give an hour warning before the Earthquake or other disaster hits There should also be double the amount of toilets that there are the lines at the bathrooms were CRAZY!!

What is the deal with NO VENDERS? Yes, there was the occasional Cherro (however you spell it). But it was very rare to see any other vendors at all, even Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, and NEW YORK Sell beer with vendors. No Dogs Either. This just forced you to go back and fight the crowds shoulder to shoulder through the narrow halls.

The worst part were the ushers!! The game was over and they were in your face telling you that you had to leave. They said they had to let the seagulls in to clean or something. Where were you supposed to go? Back into the Hurd of people waiting to get to the crowded stairways and ramps to inch your way to freedom out of that Hell Hole!!

Needless to say ONE Visit was more that Enough!! I just hope that another 1989 World Series game never happens again because if it does I really fear for those people. I am Just glad to say that I won't be there.

If you are a Fan Make one visit and mark it off your list. Spend the rest of your time in San Fran at the Warf or Alcatraz they were much nicer

Impressive...

Total Score: 4.29

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 4

Really a visually impressive ballpark in a great location. I found it really easy to get to the ballpark after a spending the day in the city being a tourist. Loved the atmosphere surrounding the stadium before the game – enjoyed chatting with the locals over a few drinks. Good range of food although I’m not sold on the garlic fries – the entire park smells of garlic! The fans were particularly boisterous (the Giants were hosting the Dodgers) inside the park, although I found their hostility a little unnerving at first. Also worth noting that it was very tough to get tickets and they were expensive.

24 Willie Mays Plaza

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

With how entrenched the Giants are in San Francisco and AT&T Park, it's hard to believe there was ever a time where the Giants' future was ever in doubt. At Candlestick Park, crowds were sparse and conditions were tough. It was a far cry to the beauty, natural and constructed, and corresponding unparalleled success the team has enjoyed at AT&T Park.

In 1976, the team was almost lost to Toronto. Instead Bob Lurie led an investment group to keep the team in San Francisco where they struggled most of the 1970's and 80's. Toronto was awarded an expansion franchise in 1977 and the Blue Jays were born.

Uncertainty reared its head again in 1992, just 3 years after their 1989 World Series appearance. Bob Lurie put the team up for sale and a group of investors from St. Petersburg reached an agreement to purchase the team. That is when Oakland A's owner Walter Haas granted the exclusive territorial rights to the South Bay (including San Jose) to Giants so they could explore the possibility of placing a ballpark there. Subsequently a local group of investors purchased the team.

Fast forward to 1997 and the ground was broken in what would become one of the great ballparks in MLB.

When the Giants moved to 3rd and King they did absolutely everything correct aesthetically and historically. They honor great Giants of the past at every turn around the ballpark, the park opens its arms to the bay, and the marketing team does everything in its power to make fans feel like it is the only place to be in the city.

$3 apple for free!

Total Score: 3.43

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 2
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 2

This is a "new" ballpark, it has a few interesting site lines, I liked looking at the wall in right field and all of the outfield had personality, but looking back from the outfield in didn't have much charm. I attended Opening Day 2014 and the crowd was a lot of fun, I don't like a lot of the ballpark food and I saw a guest service person eating an apple when he walked by, I commented that I would pay $3 for an apple, I didn't think he heard me, about 10 mins later he came back and gave me an apple! Well done sir, great hospitality!

Best stadium in San Francisco

Total Score: 4.43

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

I know, it's the only one. What can you expect from a Dodger fan. I live in Monterey so this is the stadium I have to go to to see an MLB game. Only other choice is Oakland and.... yuck! Stadium is extremely nice. Food is as advertised. Tasty but expensive. Best part for a Blue fan though is the fan reception. At Candlestick back in the 80's I was at times more than a bit nervous. At AT&T, I feel accepted if not welcomed. Good fans and very nice environment for BB fans of all teams. Overall, for me just the baseball experience alone rates a 4.9 (not a 5 because... it is the Giants were talking about). Oh yeah, the view is amazing.

The Bay's Beauty

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

The San Francisco Giants have had more success at AT&T Park since 2000 than they did in all their years at Candlestick Park (1960-1999). Since moving downtown, the Giants have been to the World Series three times, winning in 2010 and 2012. They've also seen controversial slugger Barry Bonds set the single-season and all-time home run records during that time.

With how entrenched the Giants are in San Francisco and AT&T Park, it's hard to believe there was ever a time where the Giants' future was ever in doubt. At Candlestick Park, crowds were sparse and conditions were tough. It was a far cry to the beauty, natural and constructed, and corresponding unparalleled success the team has enjoyed at AT&T Park.

After moving west from New York and prior to the construction of Candlestick Park, the Giants played at Seals Stadium (1958 and 1959) at the corner of 16th and Bryant Streets across from Franklin Square Park in San Francisco's Mission District. Seals Stadium was the longtime home to the San Francisco Seals and the short-time home of the Mission Reds, both of the Pacific Coast League.

In 1976, the team was almost lost to Toronto. Instead Bob Lurie led an investment group to keep the team in San Francisco where they struggled most of the 1970's and 80's. Toronto was awarded an expansion franchise in 1977 and the Blue Jays were born.

Uncertainty reared its head again in 1992, just 3 years after their 1989 World Series appearance. Bob Lurie put the team up for sale and a group of investors from St. Petersburg reached an agreement to purchase the team. That is when Oakland A's owner Walter Haas granted the exclusive territorial rights to the South Bay (including San Jose) to the Giants so they could explore the possibility of placing a ballpark there. Subsequently a local group of investors purchased the team.

Fast forward to 1997 and the ground was broken in what would become one of the great ballparks in MLB.

So good

Total Score: 3.57

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 5

I was really looking forward to finally getting inside this park after walking the outside a few years ago. Definitely wasn't a let down. Great everything here, although the fans take themselves a little too seriously. It just seems crazy to me that a small body of water separates the two baseball stadiums, and they can be so different with such a different atmosphere. The year-by-year history of the Giants all along McCovey Cove is a great touch. Parking's a little on the expensive side, but it's San Francisco, so I guess that's expected.

Great Family Park

Total Score: 5.00

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

Amazing stadium. Great views of the bay. Fun park for kids with two huge coke slides in the back that are a lot of fun. Come early for batting practice to catch home runs, the kids love it. Overall one of the nicest stadiums in the MLB tied with Pittsburgh and Baltimore.

The Cove

Total Score: 4.43

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

There is a dynasty living in Major League Baseball, and it calls AT&T Park in San Francisco home. The Giants have won three of the last five Word Series, a pace that has not been set since the turn of the century. AT&T Park has been the panoramic setting for the birth of this dynasty and does everything it can to live up to the lofty expectations set by its occupant.

For four decades from 1960 to 2000, Candlestick Park had been home to the San Francisco Giants. Despite a long and storied history, Candlestick fell into disrepair in the 90’s and the need for a new home for the Giants became evident. While the San Francisco 49ers would continue to play football there well into the 2000’s, the Giants began plans to open a shiny new ballpark by the turn of the century.

Ground broke on the new stadium in 1997 in the growing neighborhood of South Beach on the China Basin waterfront. Modeled after the popular new ballpark trend started by Camden Yards in Baltimore, the park would quickly become one of the nicest in baseball. Originally named Pacific Bell Park, the doors opened on April 11, 2000. In 2003, the name changed to SBC Park and subsequently became AT&T Park in 2006. AT&T Park is now widely considered one of the top ballparks in the MLB and has some strong arguments for the top spot.

Beyond Unique

Total Score: 4.29

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 2
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

AT&T Park, home of the Giants, has been widely regarded as one of the best, if not the best ballpark in all of baseball. And if you don't think it is the best, you do have to think it is still a GREAT park. It is definitely one of a kind that cannot be replaced in any sort.

FOOD & BEVERAGE: The words "something for everybody" is underrated here. Basic fare, to SF stables (Crab sandwiches, garlic fries, etc.), to mexican fare, to ice cream to hot fudge sundaes, to pitas, etc. I could go on and on. And the actual quality of it is top notch. It is probably a reason why the foods are a tad more expensive than anywhere else.

ATMOSPHERE: The place is always kicking it seems, whether they are winning or losing. You just know you are in a great baseball place the minute you walk in through the neon lit gates and see all the great history of the Giants on the walls and so forth.

NEIGHBORHOOD: Yeah, you do have some places to hit after the game, but it is still a nice walk. The area is all right but numerous panhandlers are around the area and in some cases right at the gates. I don't want to sound rude, but it was way excessive and while there are signs saying no panhandling, it doesn't look to be enforced.

FANS: They are a supportive and a festive bunch and are into the game.

ACCESS: In terms of getting there, the roads are "easy," but San Francisco traffic is arguably the worst around and even hours well before game time it is a mess around the area. Parking doesn't come cheap here either. Probably the lone flaw of this ballpark.

ROI: Everything is expensive, though souvenirs are the standard prices. Foods, probably because they are so good is pretty expensive. But you get your bang for the buck. Plus, if you have kids the slides inside the Coke bottle are free of charge.

EXTRAS: The view of the park, wow. The layout, the uniqueness to the place, and the history of the Giants painted all over the place is definitely a must for any baseball fan, even if you are not a Giants fan.

Bias aside, among the best

Total Score: 4.71

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

When I tell people that I have attended games in all 30 MLB parks, the natural question is which one is the best. The answer depends on the questioner, baseball traditionalistor novice, just there for a game or making a weekend of it, Bud Light drinker or connoisseur of microbrews. Short answer: AT&T Park. Not just something for everyone, something excellent in all areas. Just take public transit or enjoy this walkable area of San Francisco.

Stay downtown

Total Score: 4.71

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

There are good hotels within walking distance that save on all the hassles of getting to the ballpark. StubHub provides good deals too, especially for less popular teams. Fans are great and friendly, but the sellout streak is complete BS, tons of empty seats for the games I attended. Team buys seats and puts them on StubHub, boo for that. Otherwise, the second best stadium in baseball behind PNC Park.

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