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Fenway Park

Boston, MA

Home of the Boston Red Sox

4.7

4.3

Fenway Park (map it)
4 Yawkey Way
Boston, MA 02215


Boston Red Sox website

Fenway Park website

Year Opened: 1912

Capacity: 37,495

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Welcome to Fenway Park

The Boston Red Sox bill Fenway Park as “America’s Most Beloved Ball Park,” and they may be right. Still going strong after over 100 years in use, no ballpark has been more honored in film, literature, and song than Fenway Park. With its numerous quirky angles and unique features, Fenway Park is often imitated, but never duplicated. Fenway’s old-school charms consistently rank it near the top of any ballpark aficionado’s list, and it has become one of the biggest tourist attractions in the city of Boston in its own right.

Despite its age, Fenway Park has undergone frequent renovations over the course of its long and illustrious history, keeping it modern and ensuring its viability into the next century. The team on the field has kept pace, winning three World Series championships in the 21st century. Entire books have been written detailing the history and every nook and cranny of the ballpark. Space restrictions here limit our ability to recount every last detail of the ballpark, but suffice it to say that Fenway Park is one venue that any baseball fan should visit at least once in their lifetime.

4.7

What is FANFARE?

The FANFARE scale is our metric device for rating each stadium experience. It covers the following:

  • Food & Beverage
  • Atmosphere
  • Neighborhood
  • Fans
  • Access
  • Return on Investment
  • Extras

Each area is rated from 0 to 5 stars with 5 being the best. The overall composite score is the "FANFARE Score".

Food & Beverage    5

As any self-respecting Sox fan will tell you, no trip to Fenway Park is complete without first sampling the wares of the many vendors who set up shop around the ballpark. These carts offer a variety of products ranging from sausage and pepper sandwiches, hot dogs, and cheesesteaks to grilled chicken, peanuts, and assorted beverages. Prices are generally a bit cheaper than what you would pay inside the park, and the quality is better. These private vendors can be found at locations all around Fenway Park.

While there are several different gates at which fans can enter Fenway Park, the majority of fans will enter the ballpark via gate A or gate D onto Yawkey Way. Modeled after Eutaw Street in Baltimore, the street is closed during game days and utilized as a place for fans to gather before the game and enjoy the Fenway atmosphere. Although technically outside of the ballpark, several concession stands are located here, offering some of the more unique items you will find at Fenway Park.

El Tiante's Grille features sausages, hot dogs, and Cuban sandwiches. On certain nights, Red Sox legend Luis Tiant shows up at the stand to sign autographs. Summertime Grille offers sausages, cheesesteaks, and footlong hot dogs. The Fenway Fish Shack is the place to go for fish sandwiches or lobster rolls. Younger fans will gravitate towards Wally's Favorites, where they can purchase cotton candy or lemonade, among other treats.

If the food on Yawkey Way doesn't do it for you, there are concession stands located throughout the park. Standard ballpark fare can be found throughout the park, from the overrated Fenway Frank to chicken tenders, nachos, sausage sandwiches, Papa Gino's pizza, and burgers. Fans looking to soothe a sweet tooth can find numerous ice cream stands, along with popcorn, peanuts, and cotton candy. My advice for those not partaking in adult beverages would be to purchase a souvenir sized soda. For $7.75 you get unlimited refills, making this potentially the best bargain in the ballpark.

Fans looking for healthier ballpark fare should checkout the deli stands offering fresh wraps, melts, and salads, or the gluten-free stands, which offer pizzas, hot dogs, and baked goods for those fans requiring such an alternative. If you are looking for menu items off of the beaten path, Legal Seafood clam chowder, sushi, burritos, and vegetarian options are available throughout the ballpark.

Fenway Park boasts a wide selection of beer, with Sam Adams and Budweiser the featured beverages. Fans looking for a wider variety will be pleased to find many different brands widely available at stands throughout the park. Craft beers, premium beers, as well as many different brands can be found to quench any thirst. Beware, the Red Sox charge among the highest beer prices in the Major Leagues, with small beers starting at $7.25.

Overall, if you choose to eat at Fenway Park, be prepared to spend some cash. The Sox are annually among the leaders in the Fan Cost Index, which ranks prices for various items fans may purchase while at an MLB game. There are ways to minimize your cost here, such as purchasing items from the vendors surrounding Fenway, to avoiding beer at the game (I know, blasphemy!). If you are travelling from out of town and want an authentic Fenway experience, I recommend a tall Sam Adams and a sausage sandwich or lobster roll, and top it off with an ice cream helmet.

Atmosphere    5

It's hard to top the game day atmosphere at Fenway Park, which has become one of Boston's top tourist destinations regardless of whether or not the Sox are in town. Fans flock from all corners of New England to spend an afternoon or evening at the ballpark, as do travelers from afar. Taking in a game at Fenway is a must-do for anyone traveling to Massachusetts.

Fenway Park opens its gates 90 minutes before first pitch, but the buzz around the ballpark begins much earlier than that. Fans fill the numerous eating establishments lining Landsdowne and Boylston Streets long before game time, enjoying a pregame meal or an adult beverage or two. Vendors set up shop at various points around the ballpark, and crowds mill around the various souvenir shops in the area.

Yawkey Way is closed off to public traffic at this time, and comes alive when the gates open. The air is filled with aromas from the concession stands as well as sounds from the bands that frequently play on Yawkey Way on game days. Younger fans will be drawn to the antics of Big-League Brian, who walks on stilts playing catch and interacting with the kids, as well as the face-painting and fast pitch booths located here. Older fans may gravitate towards the booth where the NESN or ESPN crews broadcast their pre-game shows. Also located on Yawkey Way is perhaps the largest souvenir store in the majors.

Fans can enter Fenway Park from a number of locations, and it is here that the millions of dollars that the ownership team has invested in the park first show dividends. Longtime Sox fans can tell you all about how cramped, dark, and dank the concourse used to be. Fans visiting Fenway today will enter into a wide, bright, and much more modern concourse. Concession and souvenir stands line the concourse, and modern signage is present throughout.

The opening of the Big Concourse in right field has done the most to modernize and relieve the congestion of the concourse. In what was formerly storage area, the Red Sox have created a large open area filled with concession stands, gathering places, and picnic tables. The concourse area is still crowded, especially in certain areas, but it's much improved over what it used to be.

Of course, all this is just a precursor for what awaits fans as they climb the ramps from the concourse to the seating area. First-time as well as long-time visitors to Fenway often stop in awe as they reach the top of the ramp and get their first glimpse of the ballpark. Unfortunately, this is also where their first brush with Fenway reality often hits them. There is no room here to stop and look around. Fenway Park is a busy, crowded place, with people constantly in motion. The single walkway located about a third of the way up the seating bowl is simply too narrow to stop and take in the sights. Ushers and fans alike will encourage you to move along. Once you find your seats you can take it all in at a more leisurely pace.

A downside to Fenway's popularity is that it has become a place to be seen as well as a place to take in a game. It seems as if the Fenway crowd is constantly in motion, and that people just don't sit in their seats. It can be a distraction to those fans here to watch the game.

Some Fenway traditions have taken on a life of their own, such as the singing of Sweet Caroline in the middle of the 8th inning, which has been happening on-and-off since the mid-90's, and at every game since 2002. Make no mistake, Boston fans are into the game to a greater degree than just about any other fan base. The atmosphere at Fenway Park is as electric in April as it is in August.

Neighborhood    5

Fenway Park takes its name from the neighborhood it is located in. The term "fens" is an Old English term for a marshy area. If you walk a few blocks southeast of the ballpark you will indeed find yourself in the Back Bay Fens, one of these marshy areas.

Today, the Fenway neighborhood is one of the top destinations in Boston, primarily because of the ballpark. The area around Fenway Park is loaded with more restaurants and nightclubs than could possibly be listed here.

Landsdowne Street, located in the shadows of the Green Monster, is packed from one end of the street to the other with some of Boston's most popular nightclubs, and is packed throughout the year with students from the many colleges and universities in the area. The Cask 'N Flagon, named the top baseball bar in the country by ESPN, anchors the street, but visiting fans can sample any number of eateries before or after the game.

A block away from Fenway Park beyond right field is Boylston Street, another main road littered with packed restaurants before and after the game. Long-time fans frequent establishments such as the Baseball Tavern, known for their chicken wings, and Jerry Remy's, named for the popular player and broadcaster. Fans arriving well before game time can find plenty to keep themselves occupied in nearby Kenmore Square, where many shops and yes, more restaurants are located.

Fans interested in exploring more than just Boston's baseball scene will find much to do here. Explore the Freedom Trail, a walking trail through the city that links several historical locations, many of them a destination in their own right. Tours of the Boston Harbor are well worth a look, as is Faneuil Hall, a colonial meeting house which has been converted into a shopping and tourist destination. Museums, galleries, and tours of all kinds are located throughout the city, making Boston one of the top tourist destinations in the country.

Fans    5

Red Sox fans are known for their dedication to their team, and they pack Fenway to the rafters game after game. The team had a 10 year long sellout streak end in 2013, but that does not mean that tickets have suddenly become easy to find. If traveling from out of town, be sure to get your tickets in advance, or be forced to pay outrageous ticket broker or scalper prices. Some unused tickets are made available on the day of the game, but it's a gamble as to what prices and what tickets are available from day to day.

Red Sox fans also carry a reputation as some of the most knowledgeable and toughest in the majors. If you come to Fenway sporting the opposition's colors, chances are you will hear some ribbing from the locals. Despite their reputation though, most Fenway fans are quite friendly towards opposing fans.

Boston fans arrive early and stay late for games at Fenway Park. However, there is a subset of fans at Fenway Park that go to the ballpark to be seen as much to take in a game. These fans are known derisively in these parts as "pink hat" fans, and you are as likely to run into them as you are to run into fans who have held the same season tickets for 40 years. Pink hat fans are easy to spot. They talk amongst themselves throughout the game with a volume that can be heard several rows away. Their topics generally have nothing to do with the game at hand. They tend to get up to go to the concession stands at random times, blocking everyone's view in the process, and they take multiple selfies throughout the game, also at random moments. Fenway Park seems to have more pink hat fans than other ballparks, but do not fret, they are generally harmless. Once they have had the chance to sing Sweet Caroline, pink hat fans usually go home.

Access    4

As anyone who has ever tried to get around the crooked, cramped streets of the city of Boston will tell you, leave your car at home if at all possible. If you must drive to Fenway Park, be sure to give yourself extra time to get where you are going. Any local will tell you about their own favorite method for getting to Fenway, and they will swear that it's the fastest, least congested way to get there, and that none of the other 4.5 million people in the Greater Boston area knows about it. One piece of advice-they are wrong! Simply put, there is no way to get to Fenway Park without hitting some kind of delay along the way. Some days may be better than others, but traffic is a fact of life for Boston drivers, along with construction and crowded streets. If you must drive, take along a guide who knows their way around the city. You are going to need their help. And I am NOT going to tell you my secret shortcut to get to Fenway.

The best method for getting to Fenway Park is to take public transportation. The MBTA, or "T," as it is known locally, provides several different methods for baseball fans to get to the game. Most fans will take the subway, as the B, C, and D versions of the Green Line stop at Kenmore Station, located a short five minute walk from Fenway Park.

If traveling from the western suburbs of Boston, take the commuter rail, which stops right across the street from Fenway Park at the Yawkey Station. There are similar trains which travel into the city from the northern or southern suburbs, but which will require a transfer or two on the subway system to arrive at the aforementioned Kenmore station.

If taking a bus is more your speed, Routes 1, 8, 19, 47, 55, 57, 60, 65, CT1, CT2, and CT3 stop within walking distance of the ballpark. Some bus routes even have stops right across the street.

Renovations that have occurred throughout Fenway Park since the John Henry ownership group took over in 2002 have resulted in improvements in all areas of the ballpark. Although there are still many seats in the park that have obstructed views, or that are facing in the wrong direction, the flow and comfort of the stadium is greater than it has ever been. The vintage 1920's seats in the grandstand are still too small for anyone approaching six feet tall or 200 pounds, but the Red Sox have maximized the space available here with several new, modern seating areas in the upper deck. Concourses are much less congested, and access to bathrooms is much improved.

Return on Investment    4

Fenway Park's small size and rabid fan base is an owner's dream. The laws of supply and demand guarantee that Red Sox fans will be willing to pay a premium to attend a Red Sox game.

As a result, the Red Sox charge the highest ticket prices of any team in the majors. The average ticket price at Fenway is over $50. This figure is even more distorted by the fact that the more inexpensive seats are located far from the action in the bleachers or have obstructed views. Otherwise, this figure would be even higher. In fact, the Fan Cost Index ranks Fenway Park as the most expensive place in North America to catch a ball game, with a total cost of just over $350 for a family of four.

Helping to drive up the total cost at Fenway Park is parking, which averages $40 in the lots and garages around Fenway, and can run as high as $60 for premium games. Fans willing to walk a distance can cut that cost in half, but the best bet is to leave your car at home and take the "T" to Fenway. Your wallet will thank you.

The team has tried in recent years to offer cheaper alternatives to attract fans to Fenway, such as discounted tickets for students and family style promotions, but be resigned to the fact that if you are heading to Fenway, it's going to cost you.

Extras    5

The sense of history alone at Fenway Park would be enough to warrant a perfect score here, but the Red Sox go above and beyond even their own highly set bar. Banners commemorating Red Sox pennants and World Series championships are present both inside and outside the ballpark. Flags honoring every Hall of Famer to play in Boston line the outside of the park along Van Ness Street.

A recent addition to the Fenway Park experience are the three statues located outside of Gate B which honor Ted Williams, Carl Yastrzemski, Johnny Pesky, Bobby Doerr, and Dom Dimaggio. Red Sox retired numbers are hung along the right field façade and again along the outside of the ballpark.

Historical touches abound throughout Fenway Park, starting with the lone red seat in right field commemorating the longest home run ever hit at the ballpark to the plaques located throughout the park highlighting milestones and important features of the park.

The Green Monster, Pesky's Pole, Sweet Caroline, Fenway Franks, Yawkey Way, Patriots Day; the list of things to see and do at Fenway Park goes on and on...

Final Thoughts

Fenway Park is not perfect. It is cramped, crowded, and expensive. Fans used to the modern features and amenities present in new ballparks will be sorely disappointed by Fenway's old-school sensibilities. But no ballpark in the majors, save perhaps Wrigley Field, can match the atmosphere and sense of history present here. Couple that with recent renovations that have brought many 21st century comforts to the ballpark, and Fenway Park is a mix of old and new-school that cannot be replicated elsewhere.

Simply put, Fenway Park is the standard against which all other ballparks are measured.

The parking is really a bear, and until a new solution comes along, I think taking the T is the way

The parking is really a bear, and until a new solution comes along, I think taking the T is the way to go...

by paul | Jun 20, 2010 07:42 AM

Fenway is definitely No. 1 on my parks to visit before I die. When I do plan my visit to Boston, I\'

Fenway is definitely No. 1 on my parks to visit before I die. When I do plan my visit to Boston, I'll be sure to check back to re-read this. The Fenway atmosphere and experience are well-documented, but the detailed directions you include on getting to the park will be extremely helpful!

by NickKappel | Jun 24, 2010 06:36 AM

The T is the best option, drops you right at Fenway for a resonable price. Takes all the headache ou

The T is the best option, drops you right at Fenway for a resonable price. Takes all the headache out of parking/logistics/etc. Easy to get out afterwards too, hit the T and you're gone.

by switz1873 | Sep 23, 2010 02:23 AM

If you don\'t mind a 15 minute walk to Fenway on a nice summer evening in the city, then the MASCO G

If you don't mind a 15 minute walk to Fenway on a nice summer evening in the city, then the MASCO Garage located at 375 Longwood Ave. has $6 parking or you can prepay and park at 100 Clarendon St for $9 (the "Official Garage of the Red Sox")

by mveitas | Nov 11, 2010 01:23 AM

Definitely worth a visit and the extra costs!

I simply loved Fenway. Yes, there are some obstructed view seats, I had to sit on one (but who needs to see the batter anyway...?), but it is a place where you certainly feel the history by sitting on wooden and not plastic seats. And I'm saying this as an European, who had to travel all the way to the new country to experience a game in a classic and almost untouched stadium.

Oh, and one more thing:
"Don't blame us if we ever doubt you
You know we couldn't live without you
Red Sox, you are the only only only"

by tazza | May 26, 2011 04:37 AM

Fenway Park is a shrine for me

I grew up just outside Boston and started going to games at Fenway in 1960 while Ted Williams was still playing. A ticket for the bleachers, always available on game day, cost $1 and for an additional 75 cents, they would let you pass through the gate into the grandstand (essentially what is now known as standing-room, but there were always seats to be had back then. Although I now live thousands of miles away, and even though tickets are expensive and not easy to get, I make a pilgrimage to Fenway every year, just to see the old place again and to relive the memories of Sherm Feller ("ladies and gentlemen, boys and girls, welcome to Fenway Park") and the organ stylings of John Kiley - it really doesn't matter who the Sox are playing when I get tickets, although this year I scored with tickets to see them play the Yankees (for my first ever live experience in that specially charged environment. For anyone who has not been to Fenway, I can only say that you will find it a rewarding, once-in-a-lifetime experience if you go; for those who have been, I don't need to say anything: you know that Fenway is a gift that keeps on giving.

by vonhanep | May 27, 2011 12:23 AM

Sausage King

I've been hearing that the best place to eat outside of the park is the steak tips from the Sausage King. Haven't tried it,but looking forward to it the next time I'm at Fenway.

by fookayooka | Aug 29, 2011 02:31 PM

its the ford model "T" of stadiums

Its over rated ppl just think its a nice stadium becuz ESPN saids so but then agin ESPN is located in boston, they should make it a parking lot /museum and build a new stadium across the street its time to move on to somthing new the yankees did , who wants to pay 50 bones for a. Seat with a pole right in front of your view

by 3zer05 | Oct 06, 2011 11:00 AM

Fenway #1

Fenway Park, quirky, old, uncomfortable. BEST STADIUM IN BASEBALL BY FAR. Love it.

by Dbacker | Aug 03, 2012 02:47 PM

Disappointing Review on an Overrated Park

Look, I can tell you're a Red Sox fan and you're obviously proud of the park you call home, but there are three things that stick out for me on this review:
1.) My GOD this is insanely long, and unless you're a true diehard Boston fan (one that was around in the 90s and prior and not just coming aboard since 2004), you'll never read the whole thing; I know I don't have the time nor patience to do that;
2.) Of what I did read, I think you're rating yourself too high. "Access" is a 5 when you say in the first few sentences that parking is $50?! Yeah, you can easily take mass transit, but the fact you're financially limited to mass transit (unless, of course, you have money to light your cigars with) should be at least one star off there; and
3.) If you're going to go with the homer stance, at least be upfront with it as quickly as possible. Just like my Tropicana Field review where I admitted I'm a bit of a homer myself, getting it out of the way, in my opinion, saves some credibility instead of just sounding like a shill for ESPN and their perma-Boston/New York love.

by StPeteRays | Aug 21, 2012 11:30 PM

Reply to StPeteRays Comments

I am from St. Louis, not Boston as you suggest. This could have been learned by viewing my profile. I am neither a Boston fan or fan of any other team really. I just love baseball and the history of America's Pasttime. Disappointing to read disparaging comments from a fellow reviewer. Not sure what the purpose is or why he could not have made his point with a little less of sharp edge. Consider your words before you write them. Having been to over 400 different venues including every MLB, NFL and NHL venue speaks to my credibility to comparing and contrasting venues relative to the game experience. I welcome comments and differences in opinion, just not mean-spirited, baseless ones.

by puckhound | Aug 28, 2012 11:30 AM

Homer review?

What about this review makes it sound like a homer? I think it's entirely accurate. You don't have to be a fan of the Red Sox to appreciate that this is one of the best stadiums in all of sports...

by paul | Sep 03, 2012 03:35 PM

Not one bad time

I have season tickets and have not missed one home game since 2005 and i have not had one bad experience

by redsox34 | Jun 22, 2013 08:21 PM

Put Fenway on your bucket list

If you're a serious baseball fan, you MUST go to Fenway at least once. I've been wanting to go for years and I would go back in a heartbeat. Take the ballpark tour. I took the Sunday tour and while I thought it was worth it to go up to the Green Monster seats and the club seats above home plate, that's not enough. If you're a first-timer you have to go early (at least an hour before gametime) and walk around the concourses to admire all the old ads and display cases of Red Sox memorabilia. It gave me goosebumps and I about drained the battery on my camera taking pictures of everything.

As for seats, unless you're skinny, I would NOT recommend the grandstand seats. They're wooden, they're narrow and were grandfathered in to 1934 building codes (when the ballpark was renovated and basically took on the form we know today) and they're extremely tight. I would recommend either splurging for a box seat or if you're on a budget, sit in the bleachers. When I went I sat in the bleachers one game ($28 face value) and right field grandstand ($30 face value) the next. The only drawback to the bleachers are you have to turn around to see the video board and the higher up seats are a LONG way from home plate. But the atmosphere is excellent and the bleacher seats are bigger (and more comfortable) than the grandstand seats.

The neighborhood is loaded with restaurants and bars although they can get quite crowded on gameday. On Memorial Day I stopped at McGreevy's for a couple of pregame pints. It's on Boylston about a 15 minute walk from the ballpark.

As for access, taking the T is a no-brainer. I stayed at the Courtyard Marriott in Woburn just off 93 and drove to the Oak Grove station at the end of the Orange line. Parking was $6 for the day. The only thing I noticed, being that Kenmore station (which is the station you'll use to get to and from Fenway) is on the Green line, is that those trains are basically tram cars, which are MUCH smaller than standard subway trains. Which means they get extremely crowded after the game. Of course I've ridden the 7 train in New York to a Mets game and the MARTA in Atlanta to Braves games and they get packed to the gills just the same.

by george1969 | Aug 02, 2013 11:20 PM

Slight historical correction

The mayor at the time of opening was John “Honey Fitz” Fitzgerald (not Kennedy), indeed grandfather of JFK, but through JFK's mother Rose.

by mdb | Dec 02, 2013 01:04 AM

My one visit

My one visit to Fenway Park was on January 1,2010 when the Bruins hosted the NHL Winter Classic..I had so much fun I want to come back during baseball season

by PenFan3332 | Jan 12, 2014 12:29 PM

I'm a Braves' fan and...

...I don't think you have to be a "homer" to appreciate everything that's "right" about Fenway Park.

Yes, the seats are cramped (and I had box seats!!!), but that's minor (and frankly, on a 48'F late May night, I didn't mind being between two brawny dudes).

Atlanta could N-E-V-E-R get its ballpark situation right like this. I remember when there was the movement to build a larger replica blocks from Fenway, and what they opted to do instead is not only well-done, some of it's flat-out genius. Incorporating Yawkey into the gameday experience opened up the entire stadium's concourses and created a festival atmosphere most teams don't have; the Rockies in Denver, to a larger and less quaint extent, do, but not many others would. Brilliant. The Monster Seats? Brilliant.

The park just "feels" working-class Boston. It fits the city, much like the old Garden did.

The access gets a high grade because it's incredibly easy for 38,000 folks to get there - particularly because of the T. The fact that there's NOT much parking is why it's so costly. Pardon Boston for not bulldozing entire city blocks of unique architecture for another mind-numbing expanse of parking lots.

by roninmobile | Jun 05, 2014 04:11 PM

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Crowd Reviews

Fenway Park

Total Score: 4.71

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

It's hard to know where to begin when talking about Fenway. Oldest park in Major League Baseball? Check. Home to some of the most significant moments in baseball history? Check. Famous landmarks, quirks and hall of famers? Check. Rabid fan base? Check. The list goes on and on. If you've read our previous reviews, you've got an idea of what you're getting with Fenway. If you're a first-time visitor to this page, then suffice it to say that this is a can't-miss ballpark. Despite some imperfections, Fenway remains a classic baseball - no, scratch that - a classic sporting experience. In this review, I'll highlight some of the improvements both in the park and the surrounding neighborhood that only add to the fan experience in 2011.

A First-Timer's Look at Fenway

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

Fenway Park is a living piece of baseball history. This is a complete must-see for any baseball fanatic - stepping through the gates of Fenway is like taking a step back in time to the days when baseball was a young, fresh sport and stadium construction was not a multi-billion-dollar enterprise. You can almost see the old wool uniforms and taste the crackerjack. However, there's a reason newer parks aren't built like Fenway. While incredible to experience, there are plenty of challenges accessing the stadium and - in case you hadn't heard - it's really expensive to attend. As a newcomer to Fenway, I was able to take a look around the place with a critical but unbiased eye, and this stadium puts up a strong showing despite a few flaws.

Boston's Beautiful Old Monster

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

Fenway. The name alone is imbued with an incredible mix of history, heartache and, at long last, success. Built in 1912, it is currently the oldest Major League ballpark in operation, narrowly besting Wrigley Field by two years. Despite its age (and in some ways, because of it), it remains one of the best places in the country to watch a game.

The current ownership team of John Henry, Tom Werner and Larry Lucchino has made a commitment to continual improvements of the park during every-off season, and their efforts have paid off as Fenway has added both new seats and amenities that enhance the fan experience further each year.

Fenway Best in April

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 4

To me, Fenway is at its best when the weather is cold. That may just be because I love the clam chowder that you can get from Legal Seafoods, or that I think Sam Adams is better with a little nip in the air.

If there was a perfect park- this would be it.

Even Yankee fans like it.

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

Not that i'm one of those. Eew. Something about that color green is so perfect on a cold April night or a warm summer day. With a beer and a boiled hot dog on a bun that's soggy as heck.

Total Score: 2.57

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 0
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 2
  • Extras: 2

Fenway my favorite so far...

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

Though I haven't been to too many pro stadiums, Fenway Park thus far is my favorite. Citizens Bank is close, but can't match the history and that "take your breath away" feeling when you first see the field. There is just so much to love about this stadium: the neighborhood, the bar scene, the stadium design and it's quirks, the atmosphere, the monster. Yes, the seats are tight, but I'll trade comfort for atmosphere any day (ex. TD Garden or Boston Garden, which would you rather want to see a game in?). As for the parking...just take the T, it's easy. If you have the chance, try to get to Boston for a game and combine it with some other special parks that their affiliates play in: Pawtucket's McCoy Stadium is 50 minutes away and Portland's Hadlock Field is less than two hours away

cool

Total Score: 5.00

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

boo the yankees

cool

Total Score: 5.00

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

boo the yankees

cool

Total Score: 5.00

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

boo the yankees

cool

Total Score: 5.00

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

boo the yankees

cool

Total Score: 5.00

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

boo the yankees

cool

Total Score: 5.00

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

boo the yankees

Better than Wrigley

Total Score: 4.86

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

This is the mecca for baseball enthusiasts. The old Yankee Stadium was historical but ugly and lacked atmosphere. Wrigley has the atmosphere but just is a bit behind where Fenway is...the neighborhood around Wrigley has more charm than Fenway though. The fans, just as with Yankee Stadium, can be snobbish at times. Don't drive and definitely take the T.

My Review of Fenway

Total Score: 4.43

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

Every trip to my hometown team's ballpark astonishes me. Just thin of all the great players who have played on this field over an illustrious 100 years.

Yankees vs Red Sox (2011)

Total Score: 4.86

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

As a Yankee fan, I must first say it is a small park that fits the number of trophies perfectly. Now that my dig is out of the way, great ball park! You all have a piece of history, enjoy it. Food was great and so were there fans, even with my New York grey jersey leading the way.

Fenway Park 9/19/95

Total Score: 4.43

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 4

Must see stadium. I sat in awe of the "Green Monster" for the longest time. It's one of those iconic things, watching sports on tv, growing up. The place is obviously very old, so bathrooms, concessions and seating are all very subpar compared to other stadiums. Having said that, I can't imagine changing much of anything. The place is amazing and so are the fans. They know they have something special.

Step Into the Magic of Baseball History

Total Score: 4.86

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

A walk through the Fenway area of Boston just west of downtown and you might just walk past its most famous landmark. Amidst a mix of shops, restaurants, office buildings, warehouses and a university, along the southern edge of the I-90 Massachusetts Turnpike near Brookline Avenue, you will find perhaps not only one of Boston’s finest treasures, but one of baseball’s finest treasures, Fenway Park.

Breaking ground in late September 1911 and taking less than seven months to complete in time for the start of the 1912 season, the home of the Boston Red Sox has served the city well for a century. Opening just five days after the Titanic disaster, the new ballpark was christened by the Mayor of Boston and grandfather of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, John “Honey Fitz” Kennedy, when he threw out the first pitch on April 20th. The Red Sox won the game 7-6 in 11 innings against the New York Highlanders, a team renamed the Yankees the following year and a partner in perhaps the fiercest rivalry in sports.

The Red Sox even shared Fenway Park with the Boston Braves franchise, a club which now calls Atlanta and Turner Field, home. In 1914, the “Miracle” Braves performed one of the most memorable reversals in major league history when they went from last place to first place in two months. The team finished first in the National League, winning the pennant by 10½ games over the New York Giants. A four-game sweep of the heavily favored Philadelphia Athletics in the World Series was completed at Fenway Park. After an uneventful 1915 season, the team moved to Braves Field in Boston before moving to Milwaukee in 1952.

Still, the venue belongs to the Red Sox. Nearly twenty-one years after the inaugural season at Fenway Park, Thomas Yawkey entered the Boston sportscape. Born Thomas Austin, he was the grandson of lumber and iron magnate William Clyman Yawkey, who once agreed in principle to buy the Detroit Tigers in 1903, but died before the deal closed. The purchase was eventually closed by Tom's uncle, Bill Yawkey. After his father died, Tom's uncle adopted him and he took the Yawkey name. Bill Yawkey died in 1919, and left his $40 million estate to his adopted son, but a clause in the will forbade him from taking possession of it until he turned 30 years old.

Five days after Thomas Yawkey’s 30th birthday, he closed on the purchase of the Red Sox and Fenway Park for $1.2M as a gift to himself. Upon closing the sale, he quickly made three major changes to improve the ballpark after it had fallen into disrepair. He had the left field seats which had burned in a 1926 fire replaced, added bleacher seats in center and right field and perhaps the most significant change of all, erecting a 37-foot wall in what is now known as The Green Monster, a move largely designed to prevent viewing of live baseball by non-paying fans.

Thomas Yawkey’s wife, Jean, chose the distinct color which appears on the wall claiming she wanted it to resemble as close as possible the color of the lush green grass of Fenway Park. Currently, this color appears not only on the Green Monster, but the surrounding walls and facades and is uniquely named “Fens Green”, a unique shade of the color most associated with Boston due to its Irish roots, which can only be found at Fenway Park.

The Yawkeys, who owned the team and Fenway Park from 1933 to 2002, made many contributions to the city and as longtime stewards of the franchise are forever honored at Fenway Park in a clever way. The next time you get a peek at the lower portion of the Green Monster (a photo of this appears in this review’s photo gallery), take a close look just below the word “AMERICAN” where the first column of scores appears.

There you will see two vertical white bars on opposite sides of this column. As part of these vertical bars, you will find a series of dots and dashes representing Morse code. The left-hand side bar shows the initials TAY for Thomas Austin Yawkey while the right-hand side bar shows the initials JRY for Jean Remington Yawkey. It remains a touching reference to the couple who along with family spent nearly seventy years shepherding Red Sox baseball for Bostonians.

Within the last decade, the Red Sox have risen to greater prominence by contending more frequently than in decades past breaking an 86-year World Series drought in 2004 and then winning a second title three years later. The renewed excitement for this franchise has fueled the longest sell-out streak in baseball which will top 800 by the end of the 2012 season and in 2013 threaten the all-time sports sell-out record in the four major leagues of 814 held by the NBA’s Portland Trailblazers from 1977-1995.

For purposes of this piece, the focus is exclusively on baseball, although Fenway Park has hosted hockey, football and concerts over the years. Attending a baseball game here is an experience like no other so approach it in this manner and allow plenty of time to absorb the experience. It is unique in that over the years, its history has artfully been preserved while modern amenities have been added to satisfy our desire to enjoy our pastime through technology. The ballpark is a myriad of narrow and wide concourses, steep and shallow ramps and unique spaces and crevices loaded with period advertising, unique references and historic artifacts to be read and viewed as a testament to the more than 8,200 games and many thousands of memories.

When you arrive at Fenway Park, you will quickly learn why it is called Baseball’s Most Beloved Ballpark. It’s only major league competition comes from Chicago in what is known as the Friendly Confines of Wrigley Field. Fenway enjoys its own unique place in history, though. Fueled with wildly asymmetrical field dimensions and an array of special ground rules unlike any other ballpark, it stands alone.

On the day you attend the Red Sox game at Fenway Park, abandon any allegiance to their opponent and immerse yourself in old-time baseball and the experience of cheering for the Red Sox. You will be happy you did. In 2012, this gem of a ballpark celebrates its 100th Anniversary, a tribute to its status as a living baseball museum which looks very much today like it did in 1912.

Good Experience, Bad Fans

Total Score: 3.29

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 2
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 1

Went for a night time game. Good time besides the fans. Bunch of drunk idiots and I wasn't even cheering for the visiting team.

My #1

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

I've been fortunate enough to attend games in over 100 venues in 10 countries. Whenever anyone asks my favorite stadium, I always want to tell them about some obscure site that no one has never heard of. But I can't. Fenway is the best there is.

A few places come close-ish, but for me, Fenway is the clear winner. It's an icon. It's historic. It's intimate. And it's beautiful.
I don't think the perfect stadium has ever been built, but Fenway comes close.

(It loses fractional points for high ticket prices, some obstructed views, leg room, and parking. But it's still as close to perfect as I've seen. And thankfully, renovations haven't hurt it at all.)

red sox

Total Score: 0.00

  • Food & Beverage: 0
  • Atmosphere 0
  • Neighborhood: 0
  • Fans: 0
  • Access: 0
  • RoI: 0
  • Extras: 0

had an awful time

Still a Thrill after 40 Years

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 5

Fenway Park is old, cramped, overpriced, hard to get to, harder to find parking, and half the fans there don't even watch the game. Many of the seats face the wrong way, and plenty more are located behind poles. If you are any bigger than 5'6" and 150 pounds, you won't fit in the seats. Despite all these flaws, there is no other park I would rather go to watch a ball game. Nothing matches coming out of a tunnel and seeing all that perfect green.

Red Sox Nation

Total Score: 5.00

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

Been going to Fenway since I was a kid. It will always be my favorite place to watch a baseball game. When I was in college I found a broken telescope on the top floor of the John Hancock building. By broken I mean it didn't require any coins to see through it. Needless to say I caught a few games up there with a great bird's eye view of the city and the game.

Red Sox

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

Tickets are expensive, but this is THE best baseball experience in the world. Nobody can question that. Try to avoid sitting behind a pole because it's a lot more fun when you can see most of the field.

Nowhere better if you're going to sit and watch

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

Fenway is definitely one of the two great baseball classic cathedrals (along with Wrigley). To sit and watch a game, it's definitely an experience. However, if your intention is to get up and walk around as some baseball travelers do, it's one of the worst parks in baseball. This doesn't take away from the spectacular experience of attending a game at Fenway, but with all the high expectations, it's a gap.

Dirtiest BALL PARK EVER!

Total Score: 0.00

  • Food & Beverage: 0
  • Atmosphere 0
  • Neighborhood: 0
  • Fans: 0
  • Access: 0
  • RoI: 0
  • Extras: 0

EWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW!

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