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Citi Field

Flushing, NY

Home of the New York Mets

4.4

2.8

Citi Field (map it)
123-01 Roosevelt Avenue
Flushing, NY 11368


New York Mets website

Citi Field website

Year Opened: 2009

Capacity: 41,800

There are no tickets available at this time.

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In The Citi

Opened in 2008 and positioned between the U.S. Open tennis arenas and auto-body shops of Flushing, Queens, Citi Field is a physical celebration of New York City baseball. Its outer facade is designed to reflect Ebbets Field, former home of the long-departed Brooklyn Dodgers. Its main entrance, the Jackie Robinson Rotunda, salutes a man who played neither for this franchise nor in this borough, but is nonetheless more than deserving of the honor. The brick and dark-marbled concrete concourses offer brilliant views of the field from all levels, and images of Mets legends past and present are unavoidable all over the ballpark. While the stadium’s name suggests that of a standard-issue, cold separation of dollar from fan (the $400 million naming rights agreement struck with Citibank amid the bank’s massive 2008 government bailout doesn’t help in this regard), there is an unmistakable warmth to Citi Field. It is, quite simply, a fun and inviting place to watch baseball. Citi Field is what a ballpark should be.

4.4

What is FANFARE?

The FANFARE scale is our metric device for rating each stadium experience. It covers the following:

  • Food & Beverage
  • Atmosphere
  • Neighborhood
  • Fans
  • Access
  • Return on Investment
  • Extras

Each area is rated from 0 to 5 stars with 5 being the best. The overall composite score is the "FANFARE Score".

Food & Beverage    5

Citi Field's food and beverage offerings are second to none. While standard stadium options like hot dogs and chicken tenders are available, they are blown out of the park by local favorites like Blue Smoke bbq, Fuku spicy chicken sandwiches, Pat LaFrieda's burgers and steak sandwiches, Shake Shack burgers (complete with endless lines than can cost more than an inning to wait through), Two Boots pizza, and much, much more. The Foxwoods club (located on the 300 level behind home plate with sweeping views of the NYC skyline) requires special access and boasts Rao's meatballs and Pressed by Josh Capon grilled cheese sandwiches. The Promenade Club, located on the 500 level overlooking home plate, offers Arancini Brothers rice balls, Dan & John's wings, Nuchas Empanadas, and more. A large picnic area sits behind the Promenade Club on the 500 level, flanked by concession stands and another Big Apple Brews location. The Acela club in the left field 300-level offers a full buffet, with seats overlooking the field available for an extra charge. Reservations are generally required and, frankly, this is not worth it with so many tasty options available elsewhere in the park for less money. A full bar with beer, wine, and liquor overlooking the field sits at the entrance to the Acela Club (special access required), and is a good place to hide out during a rain shower.

Citi Field's beer selections are equally impressive, anchored by the four-sided Big Apple Brews stand in center field boasting dozens of craft beers as well as standard mass-market domestics. Select brews are available at concession stands throughout the concourses as well, and in the clubs mentioned above. Full bars are located in the Foxwoods Club, the Delta Club (100-level behind home plate), and the 300-level concourse on the third base line.

While the food and beverage prices certainly reflect the standards of the New York metro area, most offerings are more than worth it. The spicy chicken sandwiches from famed Momofuku restauranteur David Chang's Fuku in right field, in particular, are absolutely to die for (sauce included and delicious but absolutely not necessary).

Atmosphere    4

The team's fortunes improved greatly during the 2015 season, culminating in a World Series appearance, and the general atmosphere at the stadium has reflected the uptick in performance. The dark cloud that hung over this franchise for nearly three decades has shifted, though maybe temporarily, as young aces Noah Syndergaard, Jacob DeGrom, Matt Harvey, and Steven Matz have risen to prominence. While the atmosphere at Citi Field has never been an abjectly negative one, the increased probability of seeing a home win has brought with it a friendlier, more positive vibe. Think what you will of the nightly occurrence of The Wave at Citi Field, but it's not something that happens at a morose ballpark. The Billy Joel "Piano Man" singalong in the 8th inning also contributes to the positive atmosphere.

Outside the stadium sits a large apple similar to the famed Home Run Apple in center field, and there is often a festival-like atmosphere near the main entrances on game days with radio stations broadcasting remotely, street performers looking to make an extra buck, and other various activities for the kids. Images of Mets past and present adorn flags hanging from light poles and the building itself, and customized bricks on the ground create a broad walkway around the building.

Citi Field has something for everyone. For baseball historians, the Jackie Robinson Rotunda and adjacent Mets Hall of Fame & Museum offer a fun diversion before the game. The in-game promotions and entertainment segments include trivia, kids racing from the left field wall to third base and back, a race of four cars from center field to first base (similar to the Milwaukee Brewers' famed sausage race) and more than a few appearances from the First Couple of Mets Baseball, Mr. and Mrs. Met. Kids are more than welcome, and many of the Mets pre-game giveaways and post-game activities (such as running the bases) are geared towards the younger set. Out in Center Field, a miniature wiffle ball park and a dunking booth with a speed gun provide further entertainment for young fans (and older ones mistakenly convinced they can throw as hard as a big leaguer). The Shea Bridge, a salute to the old stadium located in right-Center Field, is a great place to meet up with friends and have a beverage from Big Apple Brews.

On the field, what used to be a pitcher's park second only to San Diego has become much more hitter-friendly, as the walls have been gradually moved in over the years to produce more home runs. The outfield wall runs in a meandering line that makes little sense to the eye, with home plate sitting 335 feet from left, 408 from center, and 330 from right. The foul poles are orange instead of the standard yellow, a nod to Shea Stadium.

Neighborhood    3

While the immediate vicinity of Citi Field is essentially a large parking lot, a chop shop ghetto that should be avoided at all costs (literally in the shadows of the stadium just beyond right field) and the U.S. Open tennis stadium complex that goes unused much of the year, there is slightly more than meets the eye within walking distance of the stadium. The vast Flushing Meadows Corona Park, home of the 1940 and 1965 World's Fairs, sits just past the tennis facilities and contains the Queens Museum, the New York Hall of Science, the Queens Zoo, and multiple mini-golf courses. The vast Citi Field parking lots are also great for pregame tailgating. Planes take off and land at nearby LaGuardia airport throughout the game, regularly passing directly over the stadium. There isn't much food and beverage available, however, aside from a McFadden's bar located on the outside of the stadium in Center Field.

Fans    5

These folks have been through quite a lot, and even the recent successes haven't quite changed the fatalistic attitudes of the Flushing Faithful. That said, the low expectations of the fans (even with a recent pennant) create a fairly jovial atmosphere. There's a certain sense of togetherness created by the fanbase, and many in the crowd are quite knowledgeable about the team's history. The team has multiple noteworthy "Super Fans," including Pin Man (who wears hundreds of Mets pins on a custom jersey), Cowbell Man (self-explanatory), and The Seven Line Army. The Seven Line Army, founded by lifelong fan Darren Meenan, regularly takes over the entire center field section of the stadium in matching t-shirts, cheering boisterously and banging thunder sticks throughout the game. This group has attended road games together in most MLB stadiums, and items from Meenan's clothing line (The Seven Line), are available for sale in a concession stand located in Center Field, as well as t-shirt tosses throughout the game.

Access    5

The famed 7 Line of the MTA subway system runs directly to Citi Field, with its station sitting less than a football field's length from the entrance to the Jackie Robinson Rotunda. The train generally runs express on game days, getting from Times Square in Manhattan to Citi Field in 20 minutes or so (also stopping at Grand Central Station). When running local, the train can take 40 minutes or more from Times Square to Citi Field and become quite crowded. The Port Washington Line of the Long Island Railroad (LIRR) runs from Penn Station to Citi Field in 15 minutes or so and serves as a great backup option when the 7 train is not operating correctly. Citi Field is the closest major team to Long Island (Queens is technically on Long Island, but don't say that to any Queens natives), and is located just off the Long Island Expressway.

The vast parking lots provide easy access and exit without too much congestion. LaGuardia airport is located very close by, and can be accessed by taking the 7 to Junction Boulevard (one stop towards Manhattan on an express train, three on a local) and transferring to the Q72 bus. An Uber, however, is a much more convenient option and, given the proximity of the airport, not significantly more expensive.

The stadium is completely handicapped accessible, with elevators and ramps readily available and many areas designated for wheelchair seating. There are plenty of restrooms all over the stadium, though a recent Beyonce concert produced complaints of a lack of stalls in the women's bathrooms. The concourses throughout the stadium are broad and generally not congested once the game begins.

Return on Investment    4

While the food and beverage inside the stadium can be quite expensive, the Mets have quite possibly the best bang for your buck of any team in the New York City. The team runs various ticket promotions all season (with plenty of BOGO and No Extra Fees deals), and secondary market tickets for most games can be purchased for very cheap if you buy them on game day (be aware that StubHub sales cut off two hours before the game, though other secondary market sites are not subject to this restriction). The best values can be found in the lower rows of the 400 level in the infield, which look directly down on home plate and give a great view of entire field. For a bit more money, the 100-level seats near each foul pole can also be had for a great deal. The most expensive seats in the house, directly behind home plate, can be had for as low as $250 on the secondary market for low-interest games (face value is over $500). The cheapest face value tickets are generally in the $10-$20 range in the 500 level.

Extras    5

One star for the scoreboard control room, visible through a glass window in the 300-level concourse, a true must-see for any broadcast nerd.

Another star for the Seven Line Army, a uniquely enthusiastic group of passionate fans.

A third star for the home run apple, which rises in center field for any Mets dinger.

A fourth for Meet the Mets, the team's 55 year-old fight song that plays from the stadium speakers at the main gate before each game.

A fifth star for the Mets Hall of Fame and Museum located in the Jackie Robinson Rotunda, featuring memorabilia from decades of franchise history.

Final Thoughts

Citi Field is an inviting, fun place to watch baseball. It is a true must-visit for any baseball fan.

As soon as it opened critical Mets fans were already ripping it! What?! Does anyone remember Shea?!

As soon as it opened critical Mets fans were already ripping it! What?! Does anyone remember Shea?! I'm a Mets fan and I loved Shea. It was a dump but it was my dump! Citi Field is a great place to see a game! Open concourses, great concessions and a beautiful park. Now we just have to get them to win. Only downfall is outside the stadium where they still have the Willets Point junk yards which are planned to be torned down, turned into retail and maybe even an arena for the Islanders so there's not much at all to do around the stadium other than the new addition of McFadden's Restaurant & Saloon to the outer portion of the park.

by LIVEfrom718 | Jun 25, 2010 06:03 AM

New Shea

I can't wait to make the trip to Citi Field. I was underwhelmed by Shea, and I still think that neighborhood around the ballpark is one of the most surreal in all of major sports, but looking at the pictures it seems like Citi Field is truly beautiul. 2012, I'll definitely make the journey...

by paul | Aug 02, 2011 12:08 PM

Good review, but...

I respectfully disagree about two things:

First, the neighborhood deserves a zero, not a three. There actually is no neighborhood unless you count highways and the auto body shops.

Also, the review says "there's really not a bad seat in the house." Not true -- there are thousands of bad seats in the house. Because the stands are so close to the field and foul territory is so small, you can't see down the lines if you are sitting in the outfield. My advice would be to sit in the infield.

http://www.bloggingmets.com/161/shea-and-citi-tales-of-2-fields/
http://www.bloggingmets.com/4706/citi-field-visit-2/

by BloggingMets | Aug 02, 2011 06:12 PM

Hall of Fame and Museum

When you visit Citi Field, I'd recommend visiting the Mets Hall of Fame and Museum located right in the ballpark in the Jackie Robinson Rotunda. It contains lots of trophies and memorabilia of Mets history and is a nice stroll down memory lane for folks who grew up in the NY area. There is no additional charge to visit the museum.

by megminard | Jan 02, 2012 07:01 PM

Almost

Shea Stadium was not the only home for the Mets before Citi, they played at Polo Grounds for a few years before Shea opened.

by CigarBoy | Jun 10, 2013 03:50 PM

A Ballpark That Has Improved Over The Years

As a big Mets fan, the biggest problem that Mets fans had with the ballpark was the lack of focus on the Mets. Among the problems that Mets fans had was the lack of blue and orange in the ballpark, and that the ballpark seemed to pay more tribute to the Brooklyn Dodgers than the Mets. This comes from the Wilpon Family, the then and still sometimes, clueless owners of the team. It took a huge amount of fan backlash for the Wilpons to "fix" the ballpark, and they have done a lot over the past 7 seasons since the ballpark opened.

First, the walls went back to being blue, like they were at Shea. Just that alone improved the in game atmosphere for Mets fans, and made it feel more like home. Another thing that really helped the atmosphere at the ballpark was the fantastic Hall of Fame and Museum that the team opened in 2010. The Wilpon's were so busy with their Dodger love, they forgot to have that ready for the ballpark's opening in 2009.

One thing that will unfortunately most likely never be changed is the name of the Jackie Robinson Rotunda. While what Mr. Robinson did for baseball and sport in general was beyond important and heroic, most Mets fans would have liked to have seen the rotunda named after a former Mets player (such as Tom Seaver or the late Gil Hodges), rather than a player who played his entire career for one of our biggest rivals. Let the Dodgers honor Mr. Robinson with that honor. With that being said, there is no denying that it is a beautiful piece of architecture and a beautiful entrance to a great place to watch a ballgame.

Over the years the Mets have continued to make the ballpark feel more like home, and more Metscentric. Most important to this has been the improvement of the team since Sandy Alderson took over as GM. With five quality starting pitchers in the rotation, there is now never a bad night or day to catch a game. It has turned into a fantastic place to watch a ball game, especially from my favorite vantage point, the Shea Bridge. The food selection is second to none, and there is an excellent craft beer selection. Of New York City's two major ballparks, Citi Field is unquestionably the nicer of the two ballparks, as aesthetically it is far superior to the new Yankee Stadium.

by drhaase | May 08, 2016 12:45 PM

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Crowd Reviews

Home of the New York Mets

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 4

Though "Big Shea" served as the home of the New York Mets from 1964-2008, Citi Field is a state-of-the-art venue to take in a ballgame. Many die-hard Mets fans admit that they miss Shea Stadium, but the Mets finally got the new ballpark they deserved.

Citi Field opened in 2009, with fan-favorite David Wright recording the first hit and first home run in the ballpark.

The stadium has a very open feel, and there's really not a bad seat in the house. In fact, the highest seat at the new 45,000 capacity ballpark is lower than the front row of the upper deck at Shea.

Citi Field has many quirks, both baseball and fan-related, that add to the overall experience. Not too many experiences rival a plane from the adjacent LaGuardia airport soaring overhead as the Mets are in a rally (the latter of which is usually a rare occasion, and I'm a Mets fan).

Once the Mets can bring consistently winning baseball back to Queens, Citi Field will start to have the feel of old Shea Stadium.

But regardless of the team, this ballpark is a must visit for any baseball fan.

Welcome to Citi Field

Total Score: 3.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 0

The New York Mets moved to Citi Field this past March and it is a dramatic upgrade over Shea Stadium, which had been their home since 1964.

During Citi Field's construction, you could sit and watch the progress from your seats at Shea Stadium as Citi Field was built behind Shea Stadium.

It is quite ironic that David Wright was the first Met to hit a home run at Citi Field, as he also hit a ball out of Shea Stadium that landed in Citi Field while it was under construction.

Shea Stadium was demolished for parking for Citi Field last winter, but the most famous feature of Shea Stadium, the Home Run Apple, was brought to Citi Field for display, and a brand new home run apple is located over the center field wall.

When the Mets management was working on the design of Citi Field, they wanted it to resemble Ebbets Field where the Brooklyn Dodgers played before their move to Los Angeles. Fans enter into the stadium up the escalator through the Jackie Robinson Rotunda where there are gift shops and video tributes in auditoriums, along with pictures and quotes from Robinson.

A unique feature of Citi Field is the Fan Walk, which is located just outside the Rotunda where fans who have purchased and still can purchase bricks in memory of loved ones who were fans of the Brooklyn Dodgers and also fans of the Mets.

Many of the bricks contain fans names that the bricks were purchased in memory of loved ones, and also if fans were present at a significant game or event, that is stated as well, whether it be a clinching game or one of the many post season games.

My husband and myself were at Game 7 of the 2006 NLCS, where we saw Endy Chavez make a spectacular leaping grab and he threw the ball into 1st base to get the double play, and several mentions of "the catch of NLCS Game 7" appear on Fan Walk.

Citi Field of Dreams!

Total Score: 4.29

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

This place is great! Check out the Jackie Robinson Rotunda, stroll the concourses and drink! Citi Field is amazing, much like PNC in Pittsburgh. The Mets made it more Mets like prior to the 2010 season after many complaints from the Citi Field Faithful. More Mets colors and banners featuring former players now decorate the stadium.

Citi Field: A tribute to Ebbets

Total Score: 3.71

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

First impressions upon seeing Citi Field is that stunning exterior. It's best seen when fans exit the train or subway station and climb down the stairs to the ballpark. The V shaped exterior and Jackie Robinson Rotunda are certainly amazing and it blew me away...however, I can totally see how Mets fans would be justifiably irritated by the exact resemblance to Brooklyn's Ebbets Field. A ballpark that played host to a team with no ties to the Mets. I do applaud management though for listening to fans and critics as they made steps to improve the stadium with the addition of the Mets Hall of Fame and more player/team tributes inside and out.

The inside design is nice and I like how they built up the outfield so you don't have to see the eyesore junkyards just beyond the stadium. Though some more views of Flushing Bay would have been nice. Fans are much closer to the field than at Shea...but be prepared that there are several seats where overhangs obstruct your view. The Centerfield area is probably the most enjoyable section in terms of making the ballpark more "Mets-ish" with the Shea Bridge and the Shake Shack. The Shake Shack has the best burger that I've tasted so far at a ballpark. Also, beer fans: there are 28 different brews available at a few of the stands!

Awsome food and views

Total Score: 4.71

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

Best food at a ballpark, only thing that is a negative is the street on the first base side behind ballpark.

Great parking, awsome atmosphere, A++

Amzaing (That they built it here)

Total Score: 3.14

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 3

What amazes me is that they chose to build the new field at the same location as Shea. That neighborhood is absolutely surreal, as you walk through the blocks of auto mechanics and other auto shops in the neighborhood...

A Royal Take on Citi Field from the Prince

Total Score: 4.14

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

My take on Citi Field is that I miss Shea Stadium. If I was made of money my opinion may be different. It's a pretty ballpark on the outside but rather ugly on the inside. Don't be mislead. There are many bad seats or "blind spot" if you will. This is especially true for the ones located on the aisles where steps, a metal bar or a glass partition obstructs your view. The food selection there is excellent. Blue Smoke has a tremendous pulled pork sandwich. They added a stand on top of the rotunda on the promenade level right behind home plate where I sit. My location in section 516 row 3 is a bargain considering the prices in the ballpark as a whole. The view is great too unlike the majority of the seats regardless of what level you're on. As a everyday fan, my view may be a little warped but I'm going to see the game not the Shake Shack out in centerfield where I see people standing on line forever it seems. The ballpark has elevators but they're very small and they don't run often enough. For a so called first class facility, they did a poor job with them. Come to Citi Field and see for yourself. Everybody has a different need or want when it comes to the ballpark experience. Please be sure to pay Royalty a visit so we can enhance your experience in our own unique way. Thank you for reading my point of view. Yours truly, Gary Herman

The other side of town

Total Score: 4.29

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

Great job on the Stadium. Modernized but still has the hometown feel that the Mets bring. Food was good, left field seats had a great view.

Memorial Day at the ballpark

Total Score: 3.71

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 2

Decided to spend Memorial Weekend in New York City and catch a game at Citi Field on Memorial Day. While we rode the subway in Manhattan, I wanted to visit Jackie Robinson's grave so we drove to the stadium. Had no trouble getting there and parking was plentiful and not too expensive. There is also a subway station at the park so, if you are comfortable getting around by subway, you can beat this park for accessibility. The food was very good. I had ribs from Blue Smoke and tried Garlic Frites too. It is very pricey ($6 for a regular dog) but this isn't too surprising since we're talking about New York. The stadium itself was OK but not great. One of the nicest features of newer stadiums is the ability to see the field while walking the main concourse or waiting in line at the food stands. For the most part, Citi Field offers these views. The exception is from behind home plate. While walking around the lower level, there is no view here. The fans were great! I wore a Phillies shirt and got some friendly ribbing from the folks around me. The crowd seemed very knowledgeable and passionate. They love their Mets! I didn't see too much of the neighborhood. We did search the internet for interesting local activities and came up empty. Instead, we visited Jackie Robinson's grave which is only a few miles away. Still, this isn't like visiting Detroit where you have to fear for your life. Overall, this is a very good place to watch a game. I'd rank the stadium behind Detroit, Baltimore, Philly and Boston but ahead of Cleveland and Yankee Stadium. As far as the overall experience, I'd says it is most similar to Philadelphia (a little remote and expensive, good food, easy access and passionate fans). Next time, I'll take the subway and, yes, there will be a next time.

Nice Ballpark

Total Score: 3.71

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

I had a great time here. I loved the look and atmosphere of the ballpark, the food was good and the fans were better than I expected. The fans would actually lecture you if you got up during play which is good to see that they are that passionate. The ballpark was easy to get to from the train as well. All in all a very nice ballpark.

My First Baseball Game

Total Score: 3.29

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 2
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

I was there for a game against the Tigers in the Summer of 2010. I'm not a baseball fan and went to my first game ever just for the experience while visiting New York. Although it didn't get me hooked on the game itself I really liked the stadium and the atmosphere. It was an everyday game of a season with a million games so the fact that the fans weren't exactly crazy there is easy to understand, but they were still great and I had a lot of fun.

The location is not great. It's not that hard to get there with the subway but it was extremely crowded, particularly on the way from the arena. The neighborhood around the stadium was dull to say the least.

Much better than New Yankee Stadium

Total Score: 3.43

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 0
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

I've enjoyed visiting Citi Field and think the stadium has much more character than the New Yankee Stadium. I especially like the Jackie Robinson Rotonda and the Pepsi Porch. The neighborhood sucks though. Not that it's unsafe, it's just non-exsistent.

A GREAT PLACE TO WATCH A GAME!!!

Total Score: 4.71

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

CitiField is an amazing place to watch a ball game. There really isn't a bad place in the stadium to sit. There are some obstructed views into the right and left field corners depending on where you sit but they are overshadowed by the overall experience. The very best part of the place is the food! You can easily go to 10 games and not eat the same food twice! Also the pre and post game parties at McFaddens are exceptional!

Citi of Despair

Total Score: 2.71

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 2
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 2
  • Extras: 2

In 2009, the city of New York opened up two vastly different ballparks for their two Major League Baseball teams. In the Bronx, the new Yankee Stadium was built as a monument to excess and the future. In Queens, the Mets new digs, Citi Field, decided to turn back the clock and salute the past with their ballpark.

First-time visitors at Citi Field will notice several elements that the Mets put in from various ballparks to make up their new home. When you walk up to the front entrance, it’s supposed to look like the Brooklyn Dodgers former home, Ebbets Field. Once your ticket is punched, you’ll be in the Jackie Robinson Rotunda, where a video tribute to the trailblazing ballplayer plays continuously. To your right is the new Mets Hall of Fame, where you’ll find both Mets World Series trophies and other bric-a-brac associated with the history of the franchise (including the original Mr. Met costume).

OK, time to go to your seat, the game is about to begin. This is where things get a bit confusing. Citi Field is built like the Mets had four different architects working at once to accommodate everyone's ideas. This is not to say that the ballpark is bad, quite the contrary actually. It’s quite handsome in spots, but things were sacrificed in the name of fan enjoyment in order to keep the blueprint of an “old” new ballpark.

For instance, the Mets and Yankees have perfected the “moat” between great seats and good seats. If you don’t have $500 or more to spend on a ticket, good luck sneaking down to the field level seats. There’s a built in breezeway lined with ushers that will not let you into the field box seats without a ticket. The field level seats are sponsored by Delta Airlines, and it is swanky in the “Skylounge” that occupies the area behind the choice seats. There are several bars, a steakhouse and a place to view the Mets batting cages within the Skylounge. Also located in the area are field level luxury boxes (hot tip from an usher: Jerry Seinfeld owns box 1 and Jon Stewart owns box 4).

If you’re wandering the main concourse looking for your seat in the first level, you’ll at least be able to check out the game, as it’s a totally open concourse. As you get into the outfield area of the concourse, you’ll crossover Shea Bridge, named for Shea Stadium, the old ballpark that was the only home of the Mets up until 2009. If you feel like finding where Shea Stadium’s home plate was, it’s located in the third base side of the parking lot outside of Citi Field.

Behind the giant scoreboard in center field, you’ll find a food court, lots of kids games (including a dunk tank with a guy wearing the opposing team’s uniform...nice). In left field, there’s a party deck located in the new, less spacious outfield. The deck was installed due to numerous complaints from Mets ballplayers that the dimensions of Citi Field were unfair and too tough to hit a home run in. The deck shaved several feet off and the Mets have seen their power numbers go up.

Sandwiched between the lower and upper deck of Citi Field is the Caesar's Club. It’s the “club” section of the stadium, filled with bars, plush chairs and tacky casino advertising.

Think Atlantic City casino lobby when it comes to the decorum, and you’d be right on the money. Also located on this level is the Acela Club, where you can sit down and eat a meal in a fine dining restaurant and watch the game. Finally, the top level, or “promenade” as the Mets call it, has very little in the way of fancy, but offers decent sight lines at a price that doesn’t break the bank.

So, let’s take an even closer look at the home of the 2013 All-Star Game, where the sluggers of baseball will take aim at the giant apple in center field during the home run derby.

Not a pretty park

Total Score: 2.86

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 1
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

Not a bad park but the aesthetics are horrible. The facade looks like no effort was put into it and it does not entirely cover the park it was meant to serve as a facade for. Inside the park the color scheme is too dark and the huge area behind the bridge is unadorned making the interior of the park look incomplete.

Getting Metter and Metter

Total Score: 3.43

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 4

Vast improvements from the first season, including a new Mets Hall of Fame and Museum and some historical moments laid in the pavement outside. Easy to get to, around, and getting on the 7 express afterwards works well too. Tickets on the secondary market are often cheaper, while the Mets use dynamic pricing at the box office now. Still too many covered seats with limited views of the scoreboard, but far more enjoyable than when it opened in 2009.

Not in the Citi

Total Score: 3.14

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 3

In 2009, the city of New York opened up two vastly different ballparks for their two Major League Baseball teams. In the Bronx, the new Yankee Stadium was built as a monument to excess and the future. In Queens, the Mets new digs, Citi Field, decided to turn back the clock and salute the past with their ballpark.

First-time visitors at Citi Field will notice several elements that the Mets put in from various ballparks to make up their new home. When you walk from the subway station up to the front entrance, it’s supposed to look like the Brooklyn Dodgers former home, Ebbets Field. Once your ticket is punched, you’ll be in the Jackie Robinson Rotunda, where a video tribute to the trailblazing ballplayer plays continuously. To your right is the Mets Hall of Fame, where you’ll find both Mets World Series trophies and other memorabilia associated with the history of the franchise, including the original Mr. Met costume.

If you are making your second visit and want to avoid the general rush at the main gate, there are other entrances in the corners and another at the back of the stadium by the bullpen that have smaller lines, and might save you time if you happen to be sitting closer to those spots.

Citi Field is quite handsome in spots, but certain elements were sacrificed in the name of fan enjoyment in order to keep the blueprint of an “old” new ballpark. For instance, the “moat” between great seats and good seats. If you don’t have $500 or more to spend on a ticket, good luck sneaking down to the field level seats behind home plate. There’s a built in breezeway lined with ushers that will not let you into the field box seats without a ticket. The field level seats are sponsored by Delta Airlines, and it is swanky in the “Skylounge” that occupies the area behind the choice seats. There are several bars, a steakhouse and a place to view the Mets batting cages within the Skylounge. Also located in the area are field level luxury boxes (hot tip from an usher: Jerry Seinfeld owns box 1 and Jon Stewart owns box 4).

If you’re wandering the main concourse looking for your seat in the first level, you’ll at least be able to check out the game, as it is totally open. As you get into the outfield area of the concourse, you’ll crossover Shea Bridge, named for Shea Stadium, the old ballpark that was the home of the Mets up until 2009. If you feel like finding where Shea Stadium’s home plate was, it’s located in the third base side of the parking lot outside of Citi Field.

Behind the giant scoreboard in center field, you’ll find a food court and lots of kids games while a party deck can be found in left field. The deck was installed due to numerous complaints from Mets ballplayers that the dimensions of Citi Field were unfair and too tough to hit a home run in. The deck shaved several feet off the distance and the Mets have seen their power numbers go up, as have their opponents.

Sandwiched between the lower and upper deck is the Caesar's Club. It’s the “club” section of the stadium, filled with bars, plush chairs and tacky casino advertising.

Think Atlantic City casino lobby when it comes to the decor, and you’d be right on the money. Also located on this level is the Acela Club, where you can sit down and eat a meal in a fine dining restaurant and watch the game. Finally, the top level, or “promenade” as the Mets call it, has very little in the way of fancy, but offers decent sight lines at a price that doesn’t break the bank.

Baseball in the Citi

Total Score: 3.43

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 4

Citi Field has been the home of the New York Mets since 2009. It replaced Shea Stadium, but it still keeps some of the great features of Shea. The home run apple from Shea stadium is seen in front of the stadium. The outside of Citi Field is modeled after Ebbets Field.

Inside of Citi Field is the Jackie Robinson rotunda. Named after the 1st player to break MLB’s color barrier, it features a large #42 as soon as you walk into Citi Field. Part of Citi Field that has come under fire recently has been the dimensions. Known as a pitcher’s park, the walls have been moved in a few times since Citi Field opened. Most recently, the walls were moved in prior to the 2015 season.

The Mets are always competing with the Yankees for supremacy of New York City. The Mets did their best to outdo their foes from the Bronx with their new stadium. The Mets and Yankees have great battles in the press, on the field, and amongst fans. The tradition is not as storied as the Yankees, but the Mets do have 2 World Series titles to their credit.

Citi Field Review

Total Score: 3.71

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 0
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 5

Beautiful ballpark on the eyes. The Mets Hall of Fame is superb, and the outfield seating/chill area is the place to be for a ball game. The ballpark is now much improved from when the Mets botched its opening in 2009.

Proper Citi Field Review

Total Score: 3.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 0
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 4

The Mets have done much to improve Citi Field since its opening in 2009. Especially in the aspect of making the ballpark feel more like home.

F&B - You name it, Citi Field's got it...and its delicious. A fitting tribute to one the worlds great culinary cities. From Shake Shack, to sausage and pepper sandwiches that the Mets former home Shea Stadium was world famous for. Citi Field also offers a solid craft beer selection at a fair price. You won't leave Citi Field on an empty stomach.

Atmosphere: The atmosphere continues to improve over the years. When opened, the ballpark suffered from the same issues as Yankee Stadium when it came to pricing out fans. Security could also be very condescending when the ballpark opened as the Mets looked to push out their core working class NYC/LI fan base, in attempt to posh up the crowd. The team owners to their credit listened to fan complaints and did a lot to fix the ballpark. Gone were the green outfield walls, replaced by the classic blue walls. Gone were the archaic dimensions, so the home run ball could make a return. Mets fans complained that the ballpark didn't feel enough like home, and ownership has done their best to address the problem. Mets ownership also realized that the Mets, more so than their crosstown rivals are a team of the middle class and have welcomed their core fan base back with open arms. The playoff atmosphere during the teams return to the post season in 2015, was the best atmosphere seen in NY baseball since Shea Stadium and the original Yankee Stadium stood. Though not perfect yet, the atmosphere is much improved. Adding to the positive vibes of Citi Field is the fact that you well see an outstanding starting pitcher for the Mets in every game. The team has a chance to win every single night.

Neighborhood: The ballpark is surrounded by a seldom used park, the US Open Tennis Center and numerous Chop Shops. In other words, its pretty bad. Tailgating is still a favorite past time for Mets fans, as there is really no other option.

Fans: With the return of their core fan base to the ballpark, Citi Field once again features some of the best fans in baseball. Unless the Phillies or Yankees are in town you won't see much in terms of fan violence, and even with that the fans are knowledgeable and well behaved. The 7 Line is one of the best fan organizations in baseball, if not the best...right up there with some of America's best soccer support clubs.

Access: Easy to drive to, and easy to get to from all five boroughs by public transportation. You couldn't ask for more.

ROI: Three years ago this would be a zero. The fact that it is now a three shows you how far this ballpark has come. The Mets still need to address the neighborhood before this score can move up.

Extras: The Mets Hall of Fame is outstanding. A must see for all Mets fans. The original home run apple is proudly displayed in the front ballpark plaza. The Jackie Robinson Rotunda is faulted in name only. Naming a major feature of your ballpark after a player who plays for one of your chief rivals is just a sports no-no. Despite what Jackie Robinson did for sports, Mets fans would have preferred to have seen the ballpark named after someone with ties to the Mets organization.

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