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U.S. Cellular Field

Chicago, IL

Home of the Chicago White Sox

3.9

3.5

U.S. Cellular Field (map it)
333 W 35th St
Chicago, IL 60616


Chicago White Sox website

U.S. Cellular Field website

Year Opened: 1991

Capacity: 40,615

There are no tickets available at this time.

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South Side Sox

U.S. Cellular Field, home of the Chicago White Sox, gets a bad rap from many ballpark pundits and baseball fans. Everything from the surrounding neighborhood, the facility, and its appearance have all been scrutinized. However, you should not believe everything you hear. This ballpark is home to great food, easy access, enthusiastic fans, and reasonable prices.

The stadium opened in 1991 to replace the 80 year-old Comiskey Park. The old park was definitely showing its age and was the oldest facility in the majors at the time. The $167 million stadium guaranteed that the club would remain in Chicago for the foreseeable future. However, within the year, a new epoch in stadium construction would set a higher standard for all future ballparks. Camden Yards opened in 1992 for the Baltimore Orioles and it harkened back to another era of ballparks, while creating an intimate view and atmosphere for baseball.

U.S. Cellular Field, known as Comiskey Park II until 2003, went through numerous renovations to make the ballpark more fan friendly. The Sox made numerous changes to the suddenly out of fashion stadium that included the addition of party decks, decorative lighting, brick on the main concourse, recoloring of the bright blue seats to hunter green, and the removal of eight rows of seats (6,600 in all) from the upper deck to reduce seating capacity to 40,615.

The most recent addition took place in 2016 with the inclusion of three new scoreboards, built with a price tag of $7.3 million. The center field video board is slightly larger than 8,000 square feet measuring 60 feet high and 134 feet wide. The new video boards replaced the antiquated system that was becoming quickly outdated and cumbersome to maintain. The Sox now have the capacity to enhance the fan experience with social media interactions and fantasy baseball statistics.

3.9

What is FANFARE?

The FANFARE scale is our metric device for rating each stadium experience. It covers the following:

  • Food & Beverage
  • Atmosphere
  • Neighborhood
  • Fans
  • Access
  • Return on Investment
  • Extras

Each area is rated from 0 to 5 stars with 5 being the best. The overall composite score is the "FANFARE Score".

Food & Beverage    4

The White Sox offer their fans an array of local and international flavors at the stadium. The built in concession stands offer the usual ballpark fare at your everyday ballpark prices. The hot dogs sell for $5.75, while hamburgers, black bean burgers, chicken tender baskets, nachos, and waffle fries sell in the range of $5.75-$10.25. Beggars Pizza can create a whole pie for $12, and there are sweet treats like ice cream, sundaes, and frozen candy bars.

The portable stands offer the most interesting and intriguing food at the stadium. The hot pressed Cuban sandwich is tangy, sweet, crunchy, and made on the spot for $8.50, while fresh corn off the cob is mixed with lime, chili, mayonnaise, and cheese for $5.50.

There are even more international treats as plump tamales are hot out of the pot for $5.75, and Asian-inspired steamed buns come by the pair with fillings of teriyaki chicken, mongolian beef, and vegetables for $7.

The local favorites include Comiskey dogs ($6.50), pierogies ($5), Polish sausages ($5.75), street tacos ($8), and Italian beef sandwiches ($6.50). These Chicago staples are enough to satisfy customers' appetites, but there is much more to sample including bacon on a stick, loaded baked potatoes, and Irish nachos.

The best dish to share is the supreme nachos that can easily feed 3-4 people for $9.50. If you have a sweet tooth and you want to make a few friends, grab a helmet filled with 12 scoops of ice cream, bananas, whipped cream, and chocolate syrup.

The beer selection is also varied and lines are long, but move steadily each game. There are a few Midwestern Brews stands that offer bottle selections from Pollyanna, Great Lakes, Two Brothers, Revolution, Half Acre, and Bells for $7.25-$9.50. Coors and Miller products are sold on draft and sell between $6.50-$9.50, while craft and premium products will cost between $7.25-$10.75. Pepsi products are sold by the bottle for $5.

The Xfinity Bar & Carvery is located in section 108 featuring a full-service bar and specialty deli sandwiches including the piled-high Ultimate Turkey Club and the Supreme Corned Beef Sandwich. There are also plenty of seats, stools, and flat screen TVs, but you are taken away from the action on the field.

Atmosphere    4

U.S. Cellular Field is located south of downtown off the Dan Ryan Expressway, but as soon as you park your car in the surrounding lots you are greeted by swarms of tailgaters tossing bags (cornhole), grilling, drinking a few beers, and decked out in Sox gear. Tailgating is somewhat uncommon at many major league ballparks, but on the southside of Chicago, it is a tradition.

The facility is broken into the 100 and 500 sections. One of the benefits of purchasing a ticket in the lower 100 section is the ability to experience the ambiance of the lower level.

The lower section is the heart and soul of the place and there are various vantage points to make a day at Sox Park fabulous. The outfield concourse contains Legends Plaza, featuring nine life-sized bronze statues of former Sox players from Minnie Minoso, Carlton Fisk, Nellie Fox, to more recent stars like Frank Thomas and Paul Konerko. It's a great spot to take a few photos and even watch the game from behind the center field wall. On certain nights, this area is Chicagoland's largest outdoor bar.

There is also the Private Bank Fan Deck that provides a raised view of the game to private parties. However, there are times it is open to the general public.

The Bullpen Sports Bar is reminiscent of the old Comiskey Park picnic area and is open to customers 21 and over. The Sox Social Lounge features draft beer and outdoor deck seating for the game in the left field corner of the stadium.

The Chicago Sports Depot is the team's official two-story team shop offering much more than Chisox gear. Add this to the four other merchandise stands inside the concourse of the stadium and you are destined to go home with a souvenir like a 1976 Bill Veeck-inspired leisure suite style Sox jersey for $299.99.

The 500 section of the ballpark features nods to old Comiskey Park. The canopy is painted dark gray featuring colorful murals of former White Sox players, All-Star programs, and yearbooks on the brick walls. The seats are steep, a painful reminder of 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s stadium construction. There is still a great food selection in the upper section, but it is not as varied as the lower level.

Neighborhood    2

The neighborhood is what U.S. Cellular Field gets knocked for most. Yes, it is not Wrigleyville, but then again there are 28 other ballparks that don't have the surroundings comparable to Wrigleyville. Bridgeport is a residential neighborhood that features affordable housing, small bars and restaurants, and is located near Chinatown. There are a few places within walking distance of the stadium to visit before or after the game.

Grandstand Sports is another amazing Sox paraphernalia store. The place is bursting at the seams with White Sox gear from every era, including authentic Mitchell and Ness team jerseys, gear for pets, and the best selection of caps.

There is a collection of local neighborhood eateries that includes the Bridgeport Restaurant offering Greek and American cuisine and homemade soup, Schaller's Pump that is a great hangout after a game offering cornbeef and cabbage, Reggie's Music Joint offering live music and 24 beers on tap, and Maxwell Street Depot, where you can grab a variety of hot dogs and sausages at the walk up counter.

However, if you are looking for more excitement, then head to the West Loop, Gold Coast, Streeterville, Magnificent Mile, or even Wrigleyville. Just remember that the neighborhood around U.S. Cellular Field is a not a dump as you might have heard from other ballpark travelers, and it has changed over the past 25 years and continues to improve.

The South Loop Hotel, Amber Inn, and Hyatt Regency McCormick Place are your closest hotels to the ballpark. The South Loop Hotel offers free secured parking and is close to the L. The Chinatown Hotel is a small budget facility that is inexpensive compared to other hotels in Chicago.

Fans    4

Sox fans are among the most underrated group of baseball fans in the country. Sure, they do not pack the stadium every day like they do on the northside of town, but then again U.S. Cellular Field is not a tourist attraction, nor is it surrounded by numerous bars and restaurants in an ultra trendy neighborhood. White Sox fans will support you during the great years, become frustrated when the team loses, but will fight if you have anything negative to say about the Pale Hose.

They are blue collar, hard working individuals who pass down their allegiance between generations. They have witnessed pennant chase heartbreaks, the 1967 Hitless Wonders held onto first place until the final four days of the season, and the Winning Ugly Sox who were upset in the ALCS in 1983. The fans move on and do not lament about the losses. They are not superstitious and blame black cats and goats for their team playoff woes like their northside neighbors.

Access    4

U.S. Cellular Field is easily accessible via public transit or car. If driving, the stadium is directly off the Dan Ryan Expressway (I-90/94) at the exit for 36th and 37th Streets. There are six lots for cars that cost $20 Monday to Saturday, and $10 for Sunday games. The CTA Red Line drops you off at the Sox/35th Station and the CTA Green Line at the 35th-Bronzeville Station. Once inside there are plenty of bathrooms to use no matter what part of the stadium you are located in during the game, so no need to wait too long.

It should be noted that if you have a ticket in the 500 section of the stadium, you may not be able to access the lower 100 section of the stadium. Depending on the size of the crowd (35,000 or more), there will be checks of your ticket stub from outside the lower section the exiting ramps. This is unfortunate due to the fact there are a few more great menu and concession options downstairs and the open centerfield concourse housing the White Sox greats statues. A dad can tell his young son about some of the Comiskey greats and take a few photos.

Return on Investment    5

Tickets for Sox games Monday to Saturday start at $7, this regulates the customer to the upper 500 section of the facility, but it is definitely a bargain for a Major League Baseball game. On Sundays, those same tickets will only cost $5 a person. Tickets in the upper deck average around $20 a person for most games, bleacher seats cost between $23-$30 per game, while tickets between first and third base start as low as $25 and peak as high as $75.

Parking is $20 for all games, except $10 for Sunday games. There are indeed various price points for fans, the hardest decision is whether or not you want to make it a cheap or expensive night at the park.

Extras    4

One extra point for the outfield concourse that is open and spacious with various concession stands and booths, bronze statues of former Sox All-Stars, and the original shower from the old ballpark.

An additional extra point for the reduced price of parking for Sunday afternoon games. A family of four on a budget can spend $30 for tickets and parking alone before entering the ballpark, including a $9.50 nacho plate for sharing, and a game at U.S. Cellular Field will not set you back. It will cost you a lot more on the northside of town at Wrigley Field.

One extra point for the tailgating. With the exception of Miller Park in Milwaukee where tailgating was seemingly invented at old County Stadium, this is quite a unique experience before a baseball game. Fans toss bags, cook on the grill, and throw down a few beers before entering the game.

One final extra point for the great selection of food throughout the stadium that includes Italian beef and Cuban sandwiches, Irish nachos, grilled Italians and Polishes, and 12-scoop banana split sundaes served in a batting helmet. The prices are reasonable, many are even large enough to share, and they are prepared to your liking.

Final Thoughts

The home of the Chicago White Sox has never been regarded as one of the better stadiums in the league. Its predecessor was once described as a "docked paddle-wheel steamer." However, the team has made ample improvements in the course of the stadium's 25 seasons that have resulted in more than a few fan-friendly areas. In other words, this is not the dump as many have stated. The tailgating, array of food, and ticket prices make U.S. Cellular Field a ballpark that should not be overlooked on your stadium journeys.

Attended a day game at US Cellular Field Yesterday, the weather wasnt the best 50 degrees and a cons

Attended a day game at US Cellular Field Yesterday, the weather wasnt the best 50 degrees and a constant rain, but besides that an enjoyable experience. The stadium is quite easy to reach from the "L", making for easy get to and getaway once the game is over. Have to give the fans a 5 out of 5 since even through the heavy rain the majority of fans never left thier seats.The food is great, if you go have to try the dog with fried onions one of the best things I've ever consumed in my life. The out of park entertainment Paul is pretty right on with, bring your walking shoes. But overall I have to say despite the weather have to give this ballpark experience a 4 out of 5.

by pderrick | Apr 26, 2010 06:27 AM

It\'s easy to forget that this team won it all just a few short years ago in 2005. Unfortunately wit

It's easy to forget that this team won it all just a few short years ago in 2005. Unfortunately with so much attention paid to the team on the North side of town, that's just the way it is in Chicago. The Cell was built right before teams started getting creative with their new parks; as such it's a big building with little character. The neighborhood surrounding offers little. I do enjoy the option for tailgates that many city parks lack; since there is an abundance of parking lots here, you'll find lots of fans grilling and playing bags before games. And White Sox fans are die-hard, so the energy in the park is good.

by jonah | Apr 27, 2010 09:34 AM

Although Chinese food isn\'t available in the park, it can be brought in. The policy at the park is

Although Chinese food isn't available in the park, it can be brought in. The policy at the park is to allow food to be brought in, provided that it's not in a hard container. We've been turned away when trying to bring in food in Tupperware. But we've been allowed in with food that we brought from Chinatown, provided that it was in the cardboard box containers. It works with any food. We bring sandwiches and fruit in plastic bags - no problem.

by zeker434 | Oct 07, 2010 07:04 PM

Level Selection

Hi Paul - Question about the level selection. If I got a ticket to say the 500 level, would I still be able to walk around the 100 level and see all the wonderful things you talked about? Or, does the stadium restrict entry to levels based on your ticket (like Dodger Stadim)? Thanks.

by megminard | May 06, 2011 11:02 PM

RE: Level Selection

Nope. If you get a 500 level ticket, then you're restricted to the 500 level - not a good thing.

by paul | May 06, 2011 11:49 PM

blue seats

The two blue seats in the outfield represent where the home runs landed from Paul Konerko and Scott Podsednik hit home runs during the 2005 World Series run.

by fookayooka | May 24, 2011 04:49 PM

RE: blue seats

That's cool...I didn't know about those. I'll have to check that out the next time I'm at the park. Where are they?

by paul | May 24, 2011 07:21 PM

RE: blue seats

I believe one is in left center and the other is in right field. Not exactly sure which sections, though. I do know that the left center one is in a section fairly close to the batter's eye.

by BelugasandBHawks | Apr 14, 2012 09:47 AM

Bullpen Sports Bar

Just thought I would a few things to the article.
1. The Bullpen Sports Bar is located in the right field under the seats and behind the fence. Opens early before the game and a great place to watch BP and maybe get a ball.
2. The new(er) Bacardi Sports Bar is now open across the street from the Stadium and is fun. Has outdoor and indoor seating and a ton of TV's inside. Bar and grill food, and drinks can be pricey but typical for stadium bar.
3. Also next door to the bar is the new two level fan shop for all Chicago sports (moslty Sox).
4. Lastly, a simple piece of advice for anyone heading to game in 2013, the red line (transit) that drops you off right next to the stadium will be under construction at some point this year and likely not open. The green line is another 4-5 blocks down and is usuable. I am sure that the organizaiton will have other ideas in place for fans that typically take the red line.

by mitch1674 | Mar 01, 2013 03:19 PM

Love this park

With the Sox being my favorite team I guess I'm biased saying that this is my favorite ballpark. The atmosphere at a Sox game is always entertaining and the food is the best in the majors. The outfield concourse is always a good spot to hang out and talk baseball with fans, sit in the bleachers and you're guaranteed to have a good time.

To add to what Mitch was saying about the red line it will be closing on May 19th and will be closed until October, it will be closed from the Cermak-Chinatown station to 95th. The red line will be using the green line tracks and go to 63rd and Ashland where the green line normal goes, the green line will only be going to Cottage Grove.

by chicagowhitesox91 | Mar 17, 2013 11:47 PM

Red Line Closing

Thanks for sharing that info on the red line shutting down. Wow, that is going to cause a lot of problems for commuters from the south side. The green line still works for fans who don't want to drive for games. The walk is a bit further, but not unreasonably so. Good news for parking revenue for the Sox though. Also, fans should keep in mind that the Cell has some of the best tailgating in MLB, so that can be worth the parking cost if you plan to arrive early and make a day of it.

by paul | Mar 19, 2013 11:34 AM

Red Line is reopen

The Red Line is open again. The Dan Ryan Branch was completely rebuilt in those five months that it was shut down and provides a much faster trip to and from 95th than before.

The Green Line is actually three blocks from the ballpark, it runs in an alley between State and Wabash.

by chicagowhitesox91 | Dec 03, 2013 09:30 PM

What game day atmosphere?

Much like Miller Park in Milwaukee, the atmosphere outside of Comiskey Park (I will never refer to this stadium by it's new "corporate name" - sorry, I'm old school like that) is rather bland. There's not much around the stadium per se and it's not like you get a nice view of Chicago from the stadium (I wonder if it would've been too much to have home field positioned where fans behind home plate can get a nice view of Chicago's iconic skyline).

I will say that accessing the stadium via the L is much better at Comiskey than at Wrigley. The 35th/Sox station is more spacious than the Addison station, though it can get a little crowded after games.

With that said, if you ever get a chance to hit Chicago when the Cubs and White Sox are playing on the same day - especially when the Cubs play during the day and the Sox play at night - do it. I got to do that three years ago and look forward to doing it again this summer (though it will be Sox playing a day game and Cubs at night).

by ctrabs0114 | Apr 23, 2014 11:34 PM

Nice place to see a game

I've read other comments that talk about the area surrounding US Cellular Field. I agree it is pretty much a wasteland. That said, I really like the inside of the ballpark. It does not have any "quirky" features but it is a very nice place to watch a game. I have attended games after it was first opened and after the renovation. Very nice improvement.

by Steve1964 | Oct 18, 2014 06:31 AM

A great place to watch a game

Although Wrigley will always get more attention from the history, the massive number of tourists, the great bars, and the "lovable loser" cult mentality (that is changing, thank goodness), the Cell is a lot more fun for families in my opinion. The exploding scoreboard, large video screens, and numerous modern features in the Cell are not found in Wrigley (and we do love the throw back feel of Wrigley too). Our children had a lot more to do at the Cell. The food is awesome, the fans are regarded as among the most knowledgable in baseball and very loyal, and the Sox player intros will give you goosebumps (although the intro from the 2005 World Champions and video from the past are still the best). True Chicago at its best, and while a different experience, every bit as good as Wrigley Field.

by chitownmedical | Feb 21, 2016 03:10 AM

Gets a bad rap

Today, this a great place to go to a game. It was a mess when first opened, and compared very poorly to all the "retro parks". Renovations over the years have helped greatly. Nice wide concourses, excellent food, and always clean. Fans at The Cell are much more knowledgeable than Wrigley, which is just a yuppie factory. You can actually bring in your own food and drink, as long as it wrapper in clear wrapper/bag, or plastic bottle. There is usually a couple of former players walking around signing autographs, taking pictures with fans. My only hit, the gigantic ad sign to either side of the scoreboard in centerfield look ridiculous, and are there simply to cover the blight of the area. Still, a great place. Wifey and I went, lower box section down 20 feet past 3rd base. Two tickets, a dog and a brat, beer and soda, grilled corn, about $135.00. Same at Fenway, about $315.00.

by phill329 | Mar 09, 2016 09:05 AM

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Crowd Reviews

U.S. Cellular Field

Total Score: 3.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 3

There's a bit of an edge at U.S. Cellular Field, the home of the Chicago White Sox, that is difficult to explain without the use of some cliche like "blue-collar." Nothing that I am able to think of adequately describes the feeling inside a White Sox game, so I'll just leave it there, with an edge.

This "edge" translates to the fans as an energetic baseball-focused experience. The food is some of the best in the Major Leagues, the concourses are wide, and the fans are true. There's everything you are looking for. And in many ways it is the antithesis of the northern neighbor at Wrigley Field.

It's an eminently walkable stadium, as long as you have 100 level tickets. This is my major criticism of the Cell. The experience from the 500 Level is so vastly different (read: worse), and segregated from the outstanding experience found in the lower section. It's more than just the view that is better on the lower concourse; it is also the food selection, ability to circumnavigate the entire stadium, and even the quality of the restrooms. This is definitely a stadium to spring for the pricier seats if you are able.

U.S. Cellular Field, Home of the White Sox

Total Score: 3.57

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 2

Many long-time White Sox fans continue to refer to the park as Comiskey, but when U.S. Cellular Field is referred to as "The Cell," it conjures up images of a dark and foreboding fortress. This image does not do the park justice. It is a wide open structure with great sight lines and large concourses that will be enjoyed by most fans of the great sport of baseball.

It's still Comiskey to me.

Total Score: 3.71

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

The best part of the new Comiskey (why I insist on calling it Comiskey, when its namesake, early 1900's owner Charles Comiskey. was a fantastic jerk is beyond me) is what so many criticize it for. It has great sightlines, a huge, walkable concourse with great field views, and is essentially a more recent Kaufmann field. I like that, as it's not pretending to be something it's not, just a good place to see a ball game.

good times...

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 3

Went to the cell this past weekend for the first time. The ball park is really easy to get to, just hop on the red line. They have good food and big beers... makes for a great night any day of the week. Also I was lucky enough to be there for the Friday night fireworks and watch Andruw Jones smoke a fastball to left for the walk off homerun

good times...

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 3

Went to the cell this past weekend for the first time. The ball park is really easy to get to, just hop on the red line. They have good food and big beers... makes for a great night any day of the week. Also I was lucky enough to be there for the Friday night fireworks and watch Andruw Jones smoke a fastball to left for the walk off homerun

I like it...

Total Score: 3.00

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 0

I really enjoying going here for games. Being able to hop on the Red Line and get delivered to the field is a huge plus. I've had some great food here (corn cup is a must) and haven't ever had a bad view regardless of where I've sat.

A Nice day at the park

Total Score: 3.14

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 2

The Cell is a pretty bland stadium, and the upper-deck seats are not good for anyone with a fear of heights. That said, it's easy to get to on the red line and the tailgating is great. Not something you find at a lot of other baseball venues. I was there on opening day a few years back and t was a blast.

12 in a row for the Tigers!

Total Score: 4.29

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 4

Saw my beloved Tigers play the Sox on 9/13 (night game) and 9/14/11 (day game). I went with my wife for the night game and highly recommend club seats for a "date night" (we were in section 316). Outfield bleachers were fine for the next day and I recommend these for a game with the buddies or family. If you are cheering on a visiting team get a seat around section 105 near the opposing bullpen. You can get right next to your favorite pitchers. The food is top-notch for stadium grub, better than what I have had at either Wrigley or Soldier Field.

Better than Wrigley

Total Score: 4.14

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 4

I may be one of the only people in the world that actually enjoys this place more than Wrigley but I do. Wrigley has great history and and great fans but I think "The Cell" is the better park. I have only been to Wrigley once as well as "The Cell" once so I'll try not to be harsh and chalk it up to just being more impressed with "The Cell". Wrigley definitely has the better neighborhood though one of the best in all of sports.

U.S. Cellular Field: Home of the Chicago White Sox

Total Score: 3.57

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

I’ll say this much for U.S. Cellular Field: it is the perfect complement to the Chicago White Sox. Not without its flaws and problems, the park epitomizes the team and its fans to an almost alarmingly eerie rate. A relic of the 1970s-early 90s era of ballparks in which bigger was better, and the ramp down from the upper deck stretches on for what seems like miles, there’s a feeling of being trapped in time.

For a team like the White Sox, that’s not necessarily a bad thing.

New Comiskey Much Nicer than the Original New Comiskey

Total Score: 3.00

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

When it opened, the ballpark was a mix of concrete and a squeaky clean, bright bowl of seats. Everyone used to love the Old Comiskey, but with age showing the landmark poorly, it was time for a change. After a few years of the first New Comiskey, interest began to wane. Then the club transformed it into a "classic" venue where much of the old style environment was put back in (such as the pull shower along the outfield concourse). It is a much more enjoyable venue wide concourse and a nod toward a classic ballpark. Great stuff.

Not Great but Not Bad Either

Total Score: 3.29

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 2

When the ballpark first opened, it was a disaster. Who was the moron that thought of Dodger Blue seats? But since then there has been a number of renovations (including getting new seats) that have greatly enhanced the fan experience. I love sitting in the outfield bleachers the crowd is fun and unlike Wrigley bleachers the people actually watch the game.

My biggest knock against The Cell is that the nieghborhood is not the most pleasant. So it's go to the game and head on home. Wish there were options to hang out after the game.

Treat YourCELLf to a Great Game

Total Score: 4.86

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

A few years ago, I went to my first White Sox game with my dad. So we take the the Amtrak "Wolverine" train to Union Station, caught a cab and headed to the park. We got there late, but it was just in the bottom of the 1st inning when we arrived. because of the hot weather, we had to change our seats, originally from the outfield to right behind home plate, so my dad paid 100 dollars for home plate seats. The food we had was awesome, the game atmosphere was great, we listened to great organ music by organist Nancy Faust who was there(as in being hired)at the time. The PA Announcer Gene Honda had a great bass voice. It was sunny, plus we won. The fireworks(even in the day time)were great to listen to. So come down to Chicago to see a white sox game.

A place for a fan and a family

Total Score: 3.71

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

There is not a bad seat in the house thanks to the renovation. The access is fantastic as you have 3 different train lines all within 4 blocks and I94 and I55 are right there. Parking is plentiful. The neighborhood offers some bars and places to eat to the west of the stadium, within walking distance. The food at the park is up there among the best in MLB. The quality is good and there are a lot of options. The Sox also offer a wide variety of beer from the standards to imports and "beers of the world" stands are located around the park. My younger kids love it for the "fundamentals" section which offers all sorts of baseball activities for kids from running the bases vs. an animated backdrop to actually coaches working with your kid on their swing. The product on the field is usually pretty good and the Sox have a host of giveaways and promotions that make it a great park for any family.

The UnFriendly Confines

Total Score: 2.43

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 1
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 3

I didn't care for U.S. Cellular Field. It's literally right next to a highway and has no neighborhood surrounding the park. The food was average and the seating was adequate. There was nothing about this ballpark that makes me want to return. We sat in the upper infield section and were denied access to the lower level to view the statues in the outfield. We paid more for our tickets than the outfield seating but weren't allowed to access that part of the ballpark without getting permission from an elevator attendant who gave us a break. The atmosphere in the outfield section was like a college party. The bathrooms were disgusting and the people were terrible. With that having been said, I liked the statues in the outfield. They were the only bright spot in an otherwise dull stadium.

Great Ballpark

Total Score: 4.14

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

US Cellular Field gets a bad rap from many people who have never been to a game here or who have not attended a game in quite some time. First, the food is top notch and plenty of variety from Cuban sandwiches, brats, nachos, hot dogs and burgers. Second, the wrap around concourse offers great views of the playing field and provides visitors to visit statues of former players, cool off under the fame showers, or visit one of the team stores. Third, parking is secure and only $10 on Sunday games where the Sox wear a throwback uniform. There are many who are afraid of the neighborhood, but it is not as bad as people say. There are homes, businesses and retail shops in vicinity. True, you are unable to walk to many of them from the ballpark, but the are is safe enough. Last and not least, the Sox fan is die-hard and hardcore fan who lives and dies with their team. I wish the Sox would lower prices in certain section for some of their games, but there are opportunities to save on tickets.

So many suites

Total Score: 3.57

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

The thing that stuck out to me was the amount of suites. Three levels of them from foul pole to foul pole was outrageous.

Overall, it was nicer than I was expecting. The amount of stats that are shown on the various video boards is kind of silly. I don't know that fans really want to see a different stat after each and every pitch during the game.

Be sure to visit the old Comiskey home plate located in the parking lot near the Bacardi at the Park.

dull

Total Score: 2.14

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 0
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 0
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 2
  • Extras: 3

dull and soulless ..... compared to Wrigley field

only saving grace was the decent food

didnt help that there must of only been 4 thousand fans in the place

easy to get to though

The Cell Has Come a Long Way

Total Score: 3.14

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

U.S. Cellular Field seems like a completely different park than the place the opened up in 1991. The White Sox heard the initial complaints and have done a lot over the years to make the place more fan friendly.

There are tons of food and beverage choices. Today, I had a jalapeno cheddar sausage and irish nachos in a green White Sox mini helmet.

The atmosphere can vary depending on what time of the year the game you're attending is played and where the Sox are in the standings. The fans aren't going to come if a bad team is being rolled out. When things are going good like they did in the mid 2000's, the place can be electric.

The neighborhood isn't the best and it obviously doesn't compare to Wrigleyville. Recent additions to the park include the Chicago Sports Depot store and the ChiSox Bar and Grill.

Access is great because the park is right next to the Dan Ryan and the Red Line.

My biggest complaint is that if you don't have a lower bowl ticket, you can't even walk the lower concourse. That policy was put into place after the Ligue family ran on the field and attacked a coach, but that was nearly a decade ago and not all fans act like those two morons.

South Side Surprise

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

From when it opened in 1991, the park was probably no more different than the cookie cutter stadiums with the large upper bowl, concrete awnings, and just a sterile feel to it. How things have changed. The White Sox upgraded by making it feel like a modern park and they did it almost perfectly. Needless to say, I was pleasantly surprised on my visit to "The Cell."

The place gets a bad label I think for what it used to be and the fact it isn't Wrigley Field. But truth be told, there isn't much to dislike about this park. It was a great experience.

FOOD: Great in variety with both food and drinks. Plenty of options for foods such as the Italian Beef sandwiches, brats, Italian Sausages, jalapeno cheddar sausages, veggie burgers, and the newly famous 3 lb grand slam helmet. Since I took my family we had the helmet and it was actually very good. In regards to the rest of the menu, the fries were good, but save your time getting a Italian beef sandwich and wait for an authentic place.

ATMOSPHERE: Again, people rip the place notably for the upper level, but it isn't much different than most of these new parks. When you go in, you get a good baseball atmosphere that in a lot of these new parks are lacking.

NEIGHBORHOOD: It hasn't been as bad as I thought, though I probably wouldn't stay around there at night. But there is not a whole lot outside the area and I wasn't going to try to find out.

FANS: I heard horror stories about the fans being rowdy, rude, etc. before I went, and it might be true if the Tigers are in town. But the fans I came across were very friendly and respectful. They were also into the game and have a great knowledge of the game.

ACCESS: Easy. Take the Dan Ryan Expressway and you are pretty much there. You park right by the park on Sundays for $10 (normally $20). Pretty reasonable.

ROI: Prices for this park are very reasonable compared to other MLB parks. Most foods hit $5-7 and some "combos" were only $8. We scored tickets for $15 in the lower left field corner and you could see anywhere in the park just fine. Probably nicer if souvenir prices were reasonable, but they weren't.

EXTRAS: The place was very clean and although not scenic, was a nice place. Remember, all you get is baseball. I also like the fact the sightlines at this park are magnificent. Definitely one of my favorite parks.......and I hate the White Sox.

U.S. Cellular Field

Total Score: 3.29

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 2

Has the feel of a classic ball park, good place to catch a game. Good variety of food and beer to find around the stadium. Parking is fairly easy to find, but traffic getting to the game can be horrible. Not a lot of things going on to keep the fans involved but overall a good experience.

U.S. Cellular Field - Home of the Chicago White Sox

Total Score: 3.14

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 4

U.S. Cellular Field opened in 1991 to mixed reviews from the White Sox faithful. It replaced Comiskey Park which had lots of history and a cozy feel to it. The new “Comiskey Park” has hosted the All Star Game (2003) and a World Series (2005) yet isn’t held in the same reverence as other Major League parks. In its nearly quarter century of existence, the stadium has undergone a major renovation including taking out rows from the upper deck and changing the seating color scheme from blue to green.

There is a certain working class feel to U.S. Cellular Field, from the neighborhood that surrounds it to the fans who attend games there. There aren’t many frills at the park, few scenic views, and the fans are a no nonsense bunch. That’s the general vibe on the south side of Chicago and the fans seem to like it that way.

The White Sox have been in existence since 1901 but success and history have been limited. They were one of the dominant teams of the first two decades of the 1900’s. World series titles in 1906 and 1917 as well as AL pennants in 1901 and 1919. After the Black Sox scandal in 1919, they went to only one World Series in 86 years. After not winning a world series title for 88 years, a title finally came to the south side in 2005.

U.S. Cellular

Total Score: 3.71

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

Not a bad stadium, not a great stadium. Sat in the upper deck on the first base side. Had a great view and was out of the sun on a pretty hot day so decent seats. Parked in a parking lot right by the stadium for $10 so I was happy about that. Food seemed average from what I saw. It is easy to get to just make time for Chicago traffic. I would attend another game there if I could but I wouldn't go too far out of my way to do so.

Just a Standard Stadium

Total Score: 2.43

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 2
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 0

Last time i was here was in 2006. Its kind of hard to get to, From the very busy bypass that goes through downtown. The field always looks nice.
I noticed that the fans are obsessed with talking bad about cub fans all the time, even when theyre not playing.

The Cell

Total Score: 3.43

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 3

Be aware that in order to walk around the lower concourse you need a lower level seat.

Good Times to Be Had at Sox Park

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 4

U.S. Cellular Field, home of the Chicago White Sox, gets a bad rap from many ballpark pundits and baseball fans. Everything from the surrounding neighborhood, the facility, and its appearance have all been scrutinized. However, you should not believe everything you hear. This ballpark is home to great food, easy access, enthusiastic fans, and reasonable prices.

The stadium opened in 1991 to replace the 80 year-old Comiskey Park. The old park was definitely showing its age and was the oldest facility in the majors at the time. The $167 million stadium guaranteed that the club would remain in Chicago for the foreseeable future. However, within the year, a new epoch in stadium construction would set a higher standard for all future ballparks. Camden Yards opened in 1992 for the Baltimore Orioles and it harkened back to another era of ballparks, while creating an intimate view and atmosphere for baseball.

U.S. Cellular Field, known as Comiskey Park II until 2003, went through numerous renovations to make the ballpark more fan friendly. The Sox made numerous changes to the suddenly out of fashion stadium that included the addition of party decks, decorative lighting, brick on the main concourse, recoloring of the bright blue seats to hunter green, and the removal of eight rows of seats (6,600 in all) from the upper deck to reduce seating capacity to 40,615.

Meh!

Total Score: 2.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 2
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 2
  • Extras: 2

The location of this ballpark is horrible. It's essentially right next to the freeway and all around it is pretty much nothing but a lot of parking. If you are this close to transit why do you need that much parking. The park itself feels old and the interior dated and their is literally no skyline view from any seat you get. This stadium could be in Mars for all you know. There is nothing about the views that tell you that you are in Chicago. On the plus side the food options are amazing. I would recommend having the desert nachos if you have room at the end of the game. The atmosphere is pedestrian but that could be because the product on the field has been terrible lately. All in all it's not a park you really have to go out of your way to see. Go to Wrigley to catch a game that makes you feel like you are actually in Chicago.

A great place to watch a game

Total Score: 4.43

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

As others mentioned, with historic Wrigley Field and all of the tourists flocking there every summer, The Cell gets overshadowed, but should not. Sox fans have been called among the most knowledgable in baseball, and besides that, are among the most loyal. Generations of Sox fans carry on the tradition, and with the modern amenities Wrigley lacks (and a lot more for children and families to explore before and after the game), a game at the Cell is really a lot of fun (the exploding scoreboard still is a tradition and fan favorite).

Fairly nice stadium

Total Score: 3.14

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 3

I've been to Cellular field twice. Once back in 2003 and more recently in 2013.

It's not too bad of a stadium. Pretty easy to get into. Not too crowded in the common areas.

Food is fairly good.

Merchandise store could be better.

Outfield stands seem to have a great atmosphere.

South Side Sox

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 4

U.S. Cellular Field, home of the Chicago White Sox, gets a bad rap from many ballpark pundits and baseball fans. Everything from the surrounding neighborhood, the facility, and its appearance have all been scrutinized. However, you should not believe everything you hear. This ballpark is home to great food, easy access, enthusiastic fans, and reasonable prices.

The stadium opened in 1991 to replace the 80 year-old Comiskey Park. The old park was definitely showing its age and was the oldest facility in the majors at the time. The $167 million stadium guaranteed that the club would remain in Chicago for the foreseeable future. However, within the year, a new epoch in stadium construction would set a higher standard for all future ballparks. Camden Yards opened in 1992 for the Baltimore Orioles and it harkened back to another era of ballparks, while creating an intimate view and atmosphere for baseball.

U.S. Cellular Field, known as Comiskey Park II until 2003, went through numerous renovations to make the ballpark more fan friendly. The Sox made numerous changes to the suddenly out of fashion stadium that included the addition of party decks, decorative lighting, brick on the main concourse, recoloring of the bright blue seats to hunter green, and the removal of eight rows of seats (6,600 in all) from the upper deck to reduce seating capacity to 40,615.

The most recent addition took place in 2016 with the inclusion of three new scoreboards, built with a price tag of $7.3 million. The center field video board is slightly larger than 8,000 square feet measuring 60 feet high and 134 feet wide. The new video boards replaced the antiquated system that was becoming quickly outdated and cumbersome to maintain. The Sox now have the capacity to enhance the fan experience with social media interactions and fantasy baseball statistics.

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