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Stade de France

Saint-Denis, Île-de-France

Home of the France National Football

3.9

3.8

Stade de France (map it)
Avenue du Président Wilson
Saint-Denis, Île-de-France 93210
France


France National Football website

Stade de France website

Year Opened: 1998

Capacity: 81,338

There are no tickets available at this time.

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The National Pride of France

The Stade de France is the largest stadium in France and is located just north of Paris. It is used for numerous sporting events such as football, rugby and athletics. It holds 81,338 covered seats and is rated as a four-star stadium by UEFA.

There is no regular tenant, although the rugby team Stade Français plays some of its home games there, while local football club Paris St. Germain choose to play matches in their own smaller Parc des Princes stadium. The Stade de France is also used for music concerts, with some of the world greatest artists having performed here such as Beyoncé, The Rolling Stones, U2, Coldplay, The Black Eyed Peas, Muse and One Direction.

It was officially opened on January 28, 1998 by French president Jacques Chirac, built at a total cost of approximately €290 million. The design was inspired by Terminal 3 at John F. Kennedy airport in New York. The roof, which weighs 14,000 tons and hangs 40 meters above ground level, is a large disk that hangs horizontally above the stadium and extends beyond the main structure. It has been the French national football stadium since 1998. Two new 196-square-metre screens were added in 2006, at that time the largest in a European stadium.

On November 13, 2015 there were several explosions near the stadium. Three suicide bombers blew themselves up as part of a coordinated series of attacks in Paris, killing six people. At the time of the attack a friendly match was being played between France and Germany, attended in person by the French president François Hollande.

Notable sporting events which have taken place at the Stade de France include the 1998 FIFA World Cup final, the 2007 Rugby World Cup final, the 2016 UEFA European Championship final and the 2000 and 2006 UEFA Champions League finals

3.9

What is FANFARE?

The FANFARE scale is our metric device for rating each stadium experience. It covers the following:

  • Food & Beverage
  • Atmosphere
  • Neighborhood
  • Fans
  • Access
  • Return on Investment
  • Extras

Each area is rated from 0 to 5 stars with 5 being the best. The overall composite score is the "FANFARE Score".

Food & Beverage    3

There are plenty of counters in the concourse of the stadium, but please notice that the prices for food and drinks are quite expensive inside the ground. A hot dog will cost you €6, as will a ham & cheese, tuna or chicken sandwich. Muffins are sold at €3 each. Half a litre of Carlsberg beer will cost you €7 while various sodas are available for €4 per half a litre.

Atmosphere    4

When empty, the stadium looks a bit pale inside with its light and dark grey seating bowls. Another colour though would improve the atmosphere dramatically. When it is full there is a great atmosphere inside the ground. You will get goose bumps hearing 80.000 people sing 'La Marseillaise' - the French national anthem.

Neighborhood    3

The Stade the France is located north of downtown Paris in the suburb of Saint-Denis. Like many other Parisian suburbs it can be dangerous there at night. The stadium is surrounded by office buildings and some budget hotels such as the Formule1 and Etap. Near these hotels there is also a McDonald's restaurant where you can eat a pre-match meal. Depending on which route you approach the stadium from, you can also have a pre-match drink in one of the various bars when walking from La Pleine Stade de France metro station towards the ground.

Fans    4

The supporters of the French national team are called 'Les Blues' (The Blue Ones) referring to the colour of the shirt the French national team play in. Most of them are dressed in blue shirts when attending a home match. In the stands you can find supporters of any age and of any race. The supporters are very passionate and support the team for most of the 90 minutes.

Access    4

The Stade de France is difficult to reach by car on match days, so you're better off just leaving your car at your hotel and taking public transport. There are many options to get to the stadium. Take the RER (Suburban train) B to La Plaine Stade de France station, only 4 mins from Gare du Nord and 8 mins from Châtelet. One train leaves every 3 minutes depending on events. RER D to Stade de France - St Denis station is 5 mins from Gare du Nord and 9 mins from Châtelet, with one train every 6 mins depending on events. Metro line 13 takes you to St Denis - Porte de Paris station, which is 16 mins from Saint-Lazare station, 20 mins from Invalides and 25 mins from Montparnasse, with one train every 3 minutes. For the RER and metro lines you can use the same metro ticket. Walking from Gare du Nord, one of Paris' major train stations, will take you approximately 10 to 15 minutes to get to the stadium.

Return on Investment    4

Although prices for drinks and snacks are rather high, tickets for a match of Les Bleus are reasonable. Prices start at €15 for adults and €10 for children, and go up to €80 for a seat in the main stand. However, bear in mind that this is not a plain football stadium, thus not taking the cheapest but the next highest category for a seat on the middle level is recommended. The stands are not very steep and there is a huge gap between the field and the seats. Although the stadium has a capacity of just 80,000 it is very impressive, which makes visiting the Stade de France a great experience.

Extras    5

The stadium offers an official 'Stade de France' tour where you can explore behind the scenes of France's biggest sport and music venue. You will visit the stands, VIP rooms, changing rooms and you can take a stroll alongside the pitch. During the tour you also visit the stadium's own museum where you can learn more about the construction of the stadium and see replica trophies and autographed guitars and stage costumes of international artists who have performed there. Tour tickets are available from Gate E priced at €15 for adults and €10 for children.

Final Thoughts

When you have checked all the beautiful and historic buildings and iconic landmarks that Paris has to offer and you have some spare time left, then it is an option to go to the Stade the France for a stadium tour. Before you do that make sure you visit the Eiffel Tower, La Louvre, Arc de Triomphe, Sacre Coeur and Notre Dame first!

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Crowd Reviews

Allez Les Bleus

Total Score: 3.71

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

In a highly centralized country like France, the Stade de France in Paris serves as the main venue for every high class event in the country. Be it the final of the FIFA World Cup in 1998, the 2003 World Championships in Athletics or the final of the 2007 Rugby World Cup, the by far largest stadium in the country hosted not only the most prestigious events in the world but is also the place to go for carrying out every prominent event in France.

The French national teams in football and rugby play nearly all their matches in the 81,000-seater, the finals of the domestic football and rugby cups are held there and it serves as a regular host for the IAAF Diamond League only to name a few. The UEFA carried out the Champions League final in the Stade twice. On top, it serves as literally the main stage for every world famous music act while expanding its capacity up to 91,000 by retracting the lower movable stands. Interestingly enough, the stadium has no under pitch heating system which led to previous cancelations of games in winter.

Built for the 1998 World Cup, the UEFA category four-rated stadium has no regular tenant although the Rugby Union team Stade Français plays some of its home games in the Stade de France while local football club Paris St. Germain chose to stay in their Parc des Princes.

The French national soccer team struggled in recent years to tie in with the successes of the golden generation around players such as Zinedine Zidane, Thierry Henry or Laurant Blanc who won the World Cup in this very stadium in 1998 and the European Championships in the Netherlands and Belgium two years later. However, early exits at the EURO in 2008 and the 2010 World Cup which was accompanied not only by an embarrassing performance on the pitch but with thwarting behavior by the players and the coaches off the pitch led to radical changes in the squad.

Today, L’équipe de France is coached by a former member of that title winning generation. It is now in Didier Deschamps’s hands to form a winning team quickly to achieve the nation’s next big goal. The 2016 European Championships will be held in France and fans are hoping to see Deschamps and Les Bleus (the blue) once again running around the Stade de France with a cup in their hands.

The National Pride of France

Total Score: 3.86

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

The Stade de France is the largest stadium in France and is located just north of Paris. It is used for numerous sporting events such as football, rugby and athletics. It holds 81,338 covered seats and is rated as a four-star stadium by UEFA.

There is no regular tenant, although the rugby team Stade Français plays some of its home games there, while local football club Paris St. Germain choose to play matches in their own smaller Parc des Princes stadium. The Stade de France is also used for music concerts, with some of the world greatest artists having performed here such as Beyoncé, The Rolling Stones, U2, Coldplay, The Black Eyed Peas, Muse and One Direction.

It was officially opened on January 28, 1998 by French president Jacques Chirac, built at a total cost of approximately €290 million. The design was inspired by Terminal 3 at John F. Kennedy airport in New York. The roof, which weighs 14,000 tons and hangs 40 meters above ground level, is a large disk that hangs horizontally above the stadium and extends beyond the main structure. It has been the French national football stadium since 1998. Two new 196-square-metre screens were added in 2006, at that time the largest in a European stadium.

On November 13, 2015 there were several explosions near the stadium. Three suicide bombers blew themselves up as part of a coordinated series of attacks in Paris, killing six people. At the time of the attack a friendly match was being played between France and Germany, attended in person by the French president François Hollande.

Notable sporting events which have taken place at the Stade de France include the 1998 FIFA World Cup final, the 2007 Rugby World Cup final, the 2016 UEFA European Championship final and the 2000 and 2006 UEFA Champions League finals

The National Pride of France

Total Score: 3.86

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

The Stade de France is the largest stadium in France and is located just north of Paris. It is used for numerous sporting events such as football, rugby and athletics. It holds 81,338 covered seats and is rated as a four-star stadium by UEFA.

There is no regular tenant, although the rugby team Stade Français plays some of its home games there, while local football club Paris St. Germain choose to play matches in their own smaller Parc des Princes stadium. The Stade de France is also used for music concerts, with some of the world greatest artists having performed here such as Beyoncé, The Rolling Stones, U2, Coldplay, The Black Eyed Peas, Muse and One Direction.

It was officially opened on January 28, 1998 by French president Jacques Chirac, built at a total cost of approximately €290 million. The design was inspired by Terminal 3 at John F. Kennedy airport in New York. The roof, which weighs 14,000 tons and hangs 40 meters above ground level, is a large disk that hangs horizontally above the stadium and extends beyond the main structure. It has been the French national football stadium since 1998. Two new 196-square-metre screens were added in 2006, at that time the largest in a European stadium.

On November 13, 2015 there were several explosions near the stadium. Three suicide bombers blew themselves up as part of a coordinated series of attacks in Paris, killing six people. At the time of the attack a friendly match was being played between France and Germany, attended in person by the French president François Hollande.

Notable sporting events which have taken place at the Stade de France include the 1998 FIFA World Cup final, the 2007 Rugby World Cup final, the 2016 UEFA European Championship final and the 2000 and 2006 UEFA Champions League finals

The National Pride of France

Total Score: 3.86

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

The Stade de France is the largest stadium in France and is located just north of Paris. It is used for numerous sporting events such as football, rugby and athletics. It holds 81,338 covered seats and is rated as a four-star stadium by UEFA.

There is no regular tenant, although the rugby team Stade Français plays some of its home games there, while local football club Paris St. Germain choose to play matches in their own smaller Parc des Princes stadium. The Stade de France is also used for music concerts, with some of the world greatest artists having performed here such as Beyoncé, The Rolling Stones, U2, Coldplay, The Black Eyed Peas, Muse and One Direction.

It was officially opened on January 28, 1998 by French president Jacques Chirac, built at a total cost of approximately €290 million. The design was inspired by Terminal 3 at John F. Kennedy airport in New York. The roof, which weighs 14,000 tons and hangs 40 meters above ground level, is a large disk that hangs horizontally above the stadium and extends beyond the main structure. It has been the French national football stadium since 1998. Two new 196-square-metre screens were added in 2006, at that time the largest in a European stadium.

On November 13, 2015 there were several explosions near the stadium. Three suicide bombers blew themselves up as part of a coordinated series of attacks in Paris, killing six people. At the time of the attack a friendly match was being played between France and Germany, attended in person by the French president François Hollande.

Notable sporting events which have taken place at the Stade de France include the 1998 FIFA World Cup final, the 2007 Rugby World Cup final, the 2016 UEFA European Championship final and the 2000 and 2006 UEFA Champions League finals

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