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Globe Life Park in Arlington

Arlington, TX

Home of the Texas Rangers

4.0

3.5

Globe Life Park in Arlington (map it)
1000 Ballpark Way
Arlington, TX 76011


Texas Rangers website

Globe Life Park in Arlington website

Year Opened: 1994

Capacity: 48,114

There are no tickets available at this time.

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Texas Rangers Globe Life Park

Globe Life Park opened in April of 1994 as a retro-type ballpark with a unique feature of the outfield being asymmetrical, instead of the common symmetrical outfield walls. The ballpark design pays tribute to a couple of “old” parks such as Tiger Stadium, with Home Run Porch in right field, and to Yankee Stadium, with a white facade above the ballpark. However, Globe Life Park has plenty of Texas-flavor architectural touches, such as a playing surface consisting of Tifway 419 natural grass, which is grown locally in Granbury, TX, and the business offices in center field provide the ballpark with its own unique identity. The ballpark has five levels of seating with a capacity of 48,114, and there are 127 suites named after former Hall of Famers.

Globe Life Park has provided a few historical moments; the first was on July 28, 1994, when Kenny Rogers pitched the only perfect game in Texas Rangers history. The following year, the ballpark hosted the Major League All Star Game, and in 1997 the first Inter-league game (against the San Francisco Giants) was played at Globe Life Park. It has also been home to the only two World Series appearances by the Rangers (2010 and 2011).

Besides Texas Rangers baseball, Globe Life Park has hosted regular season college baseball games for Texas-Arlington and Texas Christian University, as well as the Big 12 Baseball Conference Championship Tournament.

4.0

What is FANFARE?

The FANFARE scale is our metric device for rating each stadium experience. It covers the following:

  • Food & Beverage
  • Atmosphere
  • Neighborhood
  • Fans
  • Access
  • Return on Investment
  • Extras

Each area is rated from 0 to 5 stars with 5 being the best. The overall composite score is the "FANFARE Score".

Food & Beverage    5

The phrase everything is bigger in Texas is true when it comes to the food selection at Globe Life Park. No matter where you enter the park, fans are greeted with large varieties of concessions options. Major League ballparks seem to have recently upgraded their concessions with unique food items, and the Texas Rangers joined in a few years ago with "The Boomstick," a two-foot long hot dog covered with chili, cheese, and grilled onions - and this is just the beginning to the food variety at Globe Life Park. The newest addition to the hot dog family is the Flamin' Hot Cheetos Dog, an all-beef link topped with nacho cheese infused with hot Cheetos, available at the American Dog stand near section 22 or 48.

Besides the typical ballpark fare (with typical major league prices), there are additional items available for $26, such as the Beltre Burger, which is a one pound burger with bacon, jack cheese, and grilled onions, or the Choomongus, which offers up marinated beef and spicy coleslaw atop a bakery fresh bun. Holland Hot Tot'chos are sold at The Chipper stand near section 32; for $17, this culinary creation of tater tots is drizzled with Buffalo sauce and topped with steak, grilled peppers, and jalapenos, and is served with a side of spicy queso Hollandaise sauce. If you're looking for something that's more reasonable for the price, though, try the $8.50 turkey leg.

Of course, it wouldn't be Texas without BBQ selections, and there are plenty around the park. However, another touch of Texas is the State Fare concessions stand, which serves Brisket Mac & Cheese balls for $10, or chicken-fried bacon on a stick for $8. Other items such as fried Twinkies, fried s'mores, and funnel cake round out the State Fare menu.

However, the Globe has a few other food places besides the concession stands. Captain Morgan's Club is open to all ticket holders, and is an air-conditioned restaurant/bar in the center field area, while the Upper Home Run Porch deck is home to the Cholula All You Can Eat section. But for those who just want a small snack, there is the Center Field Market, which is a 'Grab N Go' place with beverages, sandwiches, and snacks that are more in-line with what you might find at a convenience store. Globe Life Park also has a menu near section 16 offering vegan-friendly foods such as vegan hot dogs, nachos, jerky, and black bean burgers.

It is not just the food that has variety but the beverages as well. The park serves Coca-Cola and Dr. Pepper products, at prices ranging from $5 - $6.50, as well as bottled water, Powerade, Snapple Tea, and Venom Energy drink. There are also frozen margaritas ($13.50), wine ($9 - $10), and 12oz draft beer and 16oz premium beer ($7- $10). The premium beers include Red Hook, Shiner, Stella Artois, St. Arnold, and Rahr's (a Fort Worth Brewery), and the park also has a craft beer stand, with prices ranging from $7 to $13.

The bottom line on the Texas Rangers concessions is that they have everything you could think of to eat at a ballpark. However, along with those interesting food ideas comes a very high price tag.

Atmosphere    4

As soon as the gates open, the Texas Rangers baseball experience begins with "The Voice of Globe Life Park," Chuck Morgan on the park's PA system. The phrase, "Welcome to Globe Life Park in Arlington" is one of the most pleasing to hear when walking in. Chuck Morgan continues to be the heart and soul of Globe Life Park, as he has been part of the overall game day entertainment since 1983; he is the inventor of many Rangers traditions, including the Ozark's Dot Race.

Globe Life Park brings the typical atmosphere of major league baseball, from the concessions stands to the sound of batting practice, but Chuck Morgan and the Texas fans are what sets Globe Life Park apart from other parks around the league. The Texas Rangers have made changes over the years to provide a great atmosphere for baseball fans, including a new jumbotron above the offices in left-center field. This addition is definitely an improvement to the overall atmosphere, as more fans can review replays and other information that used to only be seen on the right field video board.

The hardest thing about attending a game in Arlington is the weather - North Texas weather can change drastically in a 24 hour period. April through May are cooler than the summer months, but can be cold and wet. June through August are the hardest months to attend a game, with temperatures over 100 degrees, and September is no easier to predict. However, the atmosphere continues to be great at Globe Life Park, no matter what the weather brings. There is always something to keep fans entertained, for example the call to post for the Ozark Dot Race in the middle of the 6th inning. This on-field race brings a feeling like you are at the horse track, although the PA announcer does end the introduction with "No wagering, please." In addition, the traditional song of 'Take Me Out to the Ballgame' is sung during the 7th inning stretch, followed by 'Cotton Eyed Joe' while the Rangers Six-Shooters (a group of young ladies that help with in-game entertainment) sing and dance on top of the two dugouts. You will also see the Rangers mascot, a horse called Ranger Captain, who wears a Rangers jersey with the number 72, representing the year the team arrived in Arlington.

Globe Life Park has a good atmosphere to see a ball game, and depending on where the Rangers are in the standings, the park can quickly become a great atmosphere; just ask anyone who was there the night the Rangers beat the Yankees to win their first American League Championship in 2010.

Neighborhood    3

Globe Life Park is located in Arlington, Texas, between the downtown cities of Dallas and Fort Worth. However, the ballpark sits in an area surrounded by business parks; AT&T Stadium (home of the Dallas Cowboys) is on the west side of the ballpark, and Six Flags is on the east side, next to the Arlington Visitor's Center. Tailgating here provides a nice atmosphere, but the stadium is a good distance away from any watering holes or restaurants. However, some of the local restaurants provide shuttles to the park for a small fee of $5 - $10.

The lack of options to hang out before and after the game makes the Globe Life Park neighborhood very sterile. There are plans to inject more life into the area, though, with a proposed project called Arlington Live, a development of restaurants and hotels outside the ballpark. But for now, since Arlington is between Dallas and Fort Worth, those cities are the best options within a short drive.

Fans    4

Rangers fans can be some of the most avid, fun, and friendly fans you will meet in your baseball journeys, although there are a few teams and players that are treated with loud boos when in Arlington. The long-time Rangers die-hards are great to talk baseball with, as they mention how much they loved the old Arlington Stadium, and seeing players like Ted Williams, Billy Martin, Jeff Burroughs, Jim Sundburg, Richie Zisk, Jose Canseco, Juan Gonzalez, Rafael Palmeiro, Ruben Sierra, Pudge Rodriquez, and Nolan Ryan. The newer generations are enjoying the recent success of a competitive team that has won two American League Championships in less than a decade, with the current crop possibly having a chance to return to the Fall Classic.

Access    3

The lack of public transportation to Globe Life Park provides a real disservice to baseball fans, so most fans are forced to drive and park for Rangers games. A proposal for a new ballpark is being sent to voters, however, Arlington is the largest populated city without public transportation in the country, so no matter what the outcome, without public transportation access to the park will still be difficult.

Prices for general parking range from $5-$40, but if you are a Lexus owner you have the option for free parking in the Lexus lots near the park. Shuttles are provided from the more distant parking areas, as well as bicycle carriages, and shuttles from the restaurants. Be careful if you decide to attend a Rangers game while there is an event at nearby AT&T Stadium going on - with the added traffic, it will make access to the ballpark even more difficult, and more time will be needed to find available parking.

Globe Life Park has four main entrances; Southwest Airlines First Base Gate, Southwest Airlines Third Base Gate, Mazda Home Plate, and Center Field Gates. The Southwest Airlines First Base and Third Base Gates open two hours prior to game time for night games, and one and one-half hours prior for afternoon games. The Mazda Home Plate and Center Field Gates open one and one-half hours prior for all games. All of the gates have bag checks and metal detectors, but the Rangers security staff has a great handle on the logistics, and keeps a steady and quick flow through the gates.

Inside the park, the wide concourses have easy-to-read signage, allowing traffic to flow easily, and the well-designed bathroom access prevents any long lines. Around the park, several elevators are available for suite holders or guests with special needs, and there are escalators as well as walking ramps that lead from the lower concourse to the upper levels.

Return on Investment    4

Everyone loves a winner, and Rangers fans are no exception. If the Rangers are winning, ticket prices can become expensive. The Texas Rangers box office uses dynamic pricing, so weekend games will cost more than games during the week. However, you can guarantee that Yankees and Red Sox games are the highest in price, no matter what day there are on, as these are considered premier. Ticket prices range from $13 - $40 for most seats, while the infield seats are $50 to $150.

Globe Life Park allows outside food and non-alcoholic drinks into the stadium, so although the food variety is outstanding, fans can buy a ticket without the additional cost of buying ballpark food. And compared to the other sports teams in the DFW area, the Rangers are still the most affordable night of entertainment.

Extras    5

Several things enhance the overall experience at The Globe, starting with the beautiful design of the park - a combination of the old style ballparks with a Texas flavor.

The Texas Rangers Hall of Fame Museum, located in the right field area, is a great place to visit, where you can learn about the Rangers from their 1972 inaugural season at Arlington Stadium, Kenny Roger's perfect game, and MLB's first ever inter-league game. You'll also learn about Rangers playoff teams in the late 90's, and about the two American League Championship seasons.

Globe Life Park is also open for tours, which is a brilliant way to see the locker rooms, press box, sit in the dugouts, or have field access. The naming of suite bays with a mural of Baseball's Hall of Fame players on the suite levels is a plus, as are the banners of former and current Rangers players that hang around the concourse.

The Nolan Ryan statue located in Vandergriff Plaza in center field is also worth a look, as is the large merchandise store located under the center field business offices.

Final Thoughts

Globe Life Park is a fan-friendly place that provides a wonderful and inexpensive way to spend time with family and friends. The Dallas-Fort Worth area has so many things to offer for visitors from all over the world, and spending time at Globe Life Park should be on the list.

I really don\'t think this stadium is all that definitely not a 4.6

I really don't think this stadium is all that definitely not a 4.6

by jroshtein | Aug 31, 2010 02:43 PM

Well, the stadium has certainly come alive with postseason baseball. Fans can always be great when t

Well, the stadium has certainly come alive with postseason baseball. Fans can always be great when the team is great.

by paul | Oct 22, 2010 02:49 PM

My take

Access a 5/5? Well, not in my book. First it is located in what resembles in office park. There is no street parking so you have to pay high parking rates starting at $12 and then going up the closer you get to the ballpark. I think that is steep compared to let's say Houston, where there is plenty of free street parking.

I do not think it is much of a neighborhood. You really aren't going to take a nice stroll down the street to a restaurant or bar. You will drive somewhere.

The ball park is nice, but the area around it is sterile.

by CigarBoy | Mar 23, 2011 12:47 PM

Fan Death

I am really feeling terrible about the news of a 30 year old fan passing away in Arlington last night after falling from the stands 20 feet on to the concrete below. What an absolute tragedy

by paul | Jul 08, 2011 10:37 AM

Re: Fan Death

Me too, Paul. This is a horrible tragedy. Just a father and son enjoying a game and something like this happens. My heart goes out to the victims family and most of all his son.

by pderrick | Jul 08, 2011 11:23 PM

Ending a ballpark tradition?

I just read this article on FoxSports. I typically hate old traditions in baseball, but this was one I've always enjoyed. It seems that Tex Rangers fans are trying to do away with "the wave" http://www.foxsportssouthwest.com/08/02/11/Rangers-Ballpark-moves-to-stop-the-wave/landing_rangers.html?blockID=543629&feedID=3742

by DrewCieszynski | Aug 02, 2011 09:43 PM

Globe Life Park?

When did that name change happen? The name is awkward probably because it's just new to me.

by megminard | Mar 18, 2014 10:45 PM

International play

I went to a game last March, when in town for the NCAA tournament. It was an international game against a team in Mexico. I went because, I wanted to check out the stadium, it was something to do and the tix were cheap. The crowd was not that large, considering it was technically a spring training game and it was against a non MLB team. That being said, the crowd was very engaged, friendly and loud. The food was solid, but kind of expensive from what I can remember.

Security was loose, a fan told me it usually is unless Bush is expected to be in attendance. I didn't go through the whole stadium, but my seats (mid section, behind 1st base) were great and many other stadiums. My favorite aspect was the fireworks after each Rangers home run (and there were a lot on this night).

In Minnesota, they have Target Field and they pump it up as a mecca, but I liked "Globe Life Park" much more.

by MNGator13 | Apr 04, 2014 02:13 AM

After 20 years.... Still can't get enough!,After 20 years.... Still can

I have been going to this yard multiple times a year since it opened in '94 (was at the first game, Kenny Rogers Perfect game, stuck with them through the dog days of the '90s, almost every playoff game and of course the World Series) so if there is one park I am an expert on its the Ballpark in Arlington. I will agree that it needs a retractable roof desperately as it is just simply gets too hot in the middle of the summer! I know April and May are the most convenient times to visit but the best time to visit is actually September and October... North Texas in the fall is fantastic, you can not ask for better weather and the fans are rabid for playoff baseball so this makes for an unbeatable atmosphere in my opinion. (of course the Rangers have the be in the Postseason/World Series for that to be possible)
******One thing that disappointed me was the fact that the "Home Run Porch" was not mentioned under extras or atmosphere... (the large 2 deck covered porch in right field that the scoreboard and big screen sit on) This is a truly classic and unique feature to the stadium. It is a tribute to the old Tiger Stadium and there are support pillars half way down each deck that give it a classic golden age feel which is getting more and more rare these days
The parking may be a bit tough for new comers but if you know where to go its not bad at all... My biggest problem is the neighborhood, not the ballpark itself. There is really nothing in Arlington except the Ballpark and Cowboys Stadium. Six Flags is right there but that is about it and this is not practical for night games as it is usually closed when the games end.
The Shanon Stone incident was very sad but I don't think it is fair to bring that up in a review for the park.
Bottom line... I love the Ballpark and after 20 years I still cant get enough,I have been going to this yard multiple times a year since it opened in '94 (was at the first game, Kenny Rogers Perfect game, stuck with them through the dog days of the '90s, almost every playoff game and of course the World Series) so if there is one park I am an expert on its the Ballpark in Arlington. I will agree that it needs a retractable roof desperately as it is just simply gets too hot in the middle of the summer! I know April and May are the most convenient times to visit but the best time to visit is actually September and October... North Texas in the fall is fantastic, you can not ask for better weather and the fans are rabid for playoff baseball so this makes for an unbeatable atmosphere in my opinion. (of course the Rangers have the be in the Postseason/World Series for that to be possible)
One thing that disappointed me was the fact that the "Home Run Porch" was not mentioned under extras or atmosphere... (the large 2 deck covered porch in right field that the scoreboard and big screen sit on) This is a truly classic and unique feature to the stadium. It is a tribute to the old Tiger Stadium and there are support pillars half way down each deck that give it a classic golden age feel which is getting more and more rare these days
The parking may be a bit tough for new comers but if you know where to go its not bad at all... My biggest problem is the neighborhood, not the ballpark itself. There is really nothing in Arlington except the Ballpark and Cowboys Stadium. Six Flags is right there but that is about it and this is not practical for night games as it is usually closed when the games end.
Bottom line... I love the Ballpark and after 20 years I still cant get enough

by DFWsportsfan | Aug 01, 2014 02:54 AM

After 20 years.... Still can't get enough!

I have been going to this yard multiple times a year since it opened in '94 (was at the first game, Kenny Rogers Perfect game, stuck with them through the dog days of the '90s, almost every playoff game and of course the World Series) so if there is one park I am an expert on its the Ballpark in Arlington. I will agree that it needs a retractable roof desperately as it is just simply gets too hot in the middle of the summer! I know April and May are the most convenient times to visit but the best time to visit is actually September and October... North Texas in the fall is fantastic, you can not ask for better weather and the fans are rabid for playoff baseball so this makes for an unbeatable atmosphere in my opinion. (of course the Rangers have the be in the Postseason/World Series for that to be possible)
******One thing that disappointed me was the fact that the "Home Run Porch" was not mentioned under extras or atmosphere... (the large 2 deck covered porch in right field that the scoreboard and big screen sit on) This is a truly classic and unique feature to the stadium. It is a tribute to the old Tiger Stadium and there are support pillars half way down each deck that give it a classic golden age feel which is getting more and more rare these days
The parking may be a bit tough for new comers but if you know where to go its not bad at all... My biggest problem is the neighborhood, not the ballpark itself. There is really nothing in Arlington except the Ballpark and Cowboys Stadium. Six Flags is right there but that is about it and this is not practical for night games as it is usually closed when the games end.
The Shanon Stone incident was very sad but I don't think it is fair to bring that up in a review for the park.
Bottom line... I love the Ballpark and after 20 years I still cant get enough

by DFWsportsfan | Aug 01, 2014 02:54 AM

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Crowd Reviews

Rangers Ballpark in Arlington

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

In 1994, the Rangers played their first game in what has become known as "The Ballpark." It's an architectural beauty that borrowed components from great stadiums of the past, but still delivered something entirely Texan.

Nothing Memorable at First Take

Total Score: 3.00

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 2
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

The Ballpark is one that I feel like I need to experience again. Not sure if it was the heat, or my memory has gotten bad, but there is nothing specific that I remember about the trip to Arlington. That is to say, nothing that stands out as either real good or real bad.

Possibly the worst access/neighborhood in Baseball

Total Score: 2.57

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 1
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 3

When I saw on my Facebook feed that this was ranked as a Top 5 ballpark, I had to step in and and throw out a rating.

The neighborhood is awful. You have to walk quite a bit to get to any establishment from the stadium. You'll find that most of them within a mile are chain restaurants. Joe's Crab Shack might be the most annoying chain of all-time. It seems like a disco for children with average crab legs. Unless you enjoy hanging out at a children's daycare, stay far away from there.

The fans are very average. Even during the World Series, you can tell that they are not spectacular by any means. Prior to 2010, any Rangers highlight showed the stadium mostly...empty. I can't say you see many Rangers fans anywhere.

The access is my biggest complaint. It is located in Arlington, which is a bit too far away from any excitement in Dallas. The traffic in and out of there can be so awful that many hotel shuttles will refuse to go there on Gameday and cabs charge an exorbitant rate to get you there. Public transportation is very limited.

If you go during the summer months, you'll probably lose a good 5 pounds sweating from the Texas heat.

The ballpark is attractive, but doesn't warrant a 4.6 rating

Nice but not great

Total Score: 3.29

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 2
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

Don't get me wrong I'm a big fan of this ballpark during anytime but the middle of summer. I will say though this ballpark is in a bad area with not much available. As the team gets better the atmosphere gets better though. I just hope that one day more businesses or things to do open up in the area, as for now its a mediocre experience.

A Great Ballpark

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 2
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

I've spent many a summer nights here at The Ballpark. To me it's one of the better places to watch a game even with the oppressive heat that can be had at times. The food is fantastic, there isn't a bad seat in the house, and there is more to the stadium than the game. Be sure to check out the Legends of the Game Museum during your visit. It's a great little baseball museum. There isn't much around the neighborhood, although there are a few decent restaurants. If it gets too hot for you, head on into the restaurant out in right field for a cold beverage.

Everything is Indeed Bigger in Texas

Total Score: 3.86

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

Known simply as the Ballpark in Arlington, Rangers Ballpark in Arlington opened up in April of 1994 and has seen a transformed team over the years. The Rangers have come into their own over the last couple of years as they have made it to the World Series the past two years, but have unfortunately come up short both years.

The Rangers production of key young players likes Josh Hamilton, Ian Kinsler and Yu Darvish have the Rangers looking as though they plan to stay near the top for a while. The Rangers have one of the more unique ballparks in MLB which includes many nooks and crannies in the outfield and a tail wind that is a hitter’s delight. If you walk around the ballpark in Arlington you will find many items that not only catch your eye but also your taste buds such as the two foot long hot dog, known as the BoomStick.

Yep, Everything is Bigger in Texas

Total Score: 4.29

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 3

There aren't many times people have said this before when it comes to the Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, but I can be one of them: I have actually sat at a Rangers game, freezing. It was early April in 2010 and the Rangers had a game against the Blue Jays. Temperature got to about 55 but wind gusts of about 30 mph most nights knocked it down to feeling about 45.

That said, I had a great time at the game and the one after I went to. The fans were excellent/knowledgeable and the place was clean. The food was varied though not overly tasty. It was easy to get to and you felt safe around the park.

My ONLY complaints were that the sightlines were rough nearly anywhere on the right side of the field and the scoreboard was too high that it gave me a sore neck.

The other issue was they had some sort of private gathering for the Rangers Hall of Fame & Museum and that cut out a lot of the places to go, so I felt robbed of seeing their museum.

Overall, everything felt big about that park, and when it is a big BALLPARK (not stadium), that is always a good thing in my book.

Needs updating...

Total Score: 3.14

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 2
  • Extras: 2

I liked the stadium, it has some really nice site lines when looking towards the outfield, it is an older "new" stadium. It lacks some of the family activities that are becoming popular in the newer "new" stadiums, if that makes sense. The concourses are large, they need some up dating, the exterior has a presence to it. It is a huge contrast to its new neighbor (Cowboys Stadium)...

New Name, New Food, Same Game in Arlington

Total Score: 3.43

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

Globe Life Park opened in April of 1994 as The Ballpark in Arlington. Over the next 20 years, Rangers Ballpark, as the locals refer to it, has had four different name changes. However, the thing that hasn’t changed is the excitement of Rangers baseball throughout the years.

The Ballpark was built after Oriole Park in Camden Yards and is considered a retro-type ballpark. The unique feature of the ballpark is an outfield having different angles instead of the normal arch wall, making playing outfield an adventure. The Ballpark pays tribute to “old” parks such as Tiger Stadium in right field with seats in an area called the Home Run Porch. The ballpark design includes business offices in center field and helps to give the place its own identity.

Globe Life Park has provided a few historical moments over the last 20 years. On July 28, 1994, Kenny Rogers pitched the only perfect game in Texas Rangers history. A year later the ballpark hosted the Major League All Star Game and in 1997, the first Interleague game vs the San Francisco Giants was played at Globe Life Park. It has also been home to the only two World Series appearances by the Rangers (2010 and 2011).

The Globe

Total Score: 3.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

Globe Life Park opened in April of 1994 as ‘The Ballpark in Arlington,’ and although the ballpark has had a few official name changes over the years, the majority of Dallas-Fort Worth sports fans refer to the place simply as either ‘The Ballpark,’ ‘Rangers Ballpark,’ or ‘The Globe.’ Globe Life Park is a retro-type ballpark with a unique feature of the outfield being asymmetrical, instead of common symmetrical outfield walls. This makes playing the outfield an adventure for visiting teams. The Ballpark design pays tribute to a couple of “old” parks such as Tiger Stadium, with Home Run Porch in right field and to Yankee Stadium, with a white facade above the ballpark. However, Globe Life Park has plenty of Texas-flavor architecture design on the exterior and the business offices in center field provides the ballpark its own identity inside. The playing surface of Globe Life Park consists of Tifway 419 natural grass grown locally in Granbury, Texas. The ballpark has five levels of seating with a capacity of 48,114. There are 127 suites.

Globe Life Park has provided a few historical moments. The first was on July 28, 1994, when Kenny Rogers pitched the only perfect game in Texas Rangers history. The following year, the ballpark hosted the Major League All Star Game, and in 1997 the first Interleague game (against the San Francisco Giants) was played at Globe Life Park. It has also been home to the only two World Series appearances by the Rangers (2010 and 2011).

Besides Texas Rangers baseball, Globe Life Park has hosted regular season college baseball games for Texas-Arlington and Texas Christian University, as well as the Big 12 Baseball Conference Championship Tournament.

Globe Lifeless

Total Score: 3.14

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 4

Found the crowd to be fairly sedate, certainly due to the game that saw their Rangers shutout. But they arrived late and left early too. Upper concourse food options limited. Designated driver program one of the best in baseball. A good option is to park at Humperdinks and take the shuttle there and back for $5. Prices too high for what you get, the upper deck is very far away. Hall of Fame is cool.

Share your thoughts about Globe Life Park in Arlington

Local Food & Drink

Pappadeaux Seafood  (map it!)

1304 East Copeland Road

Arlington, TX 76011

(817) 543-0544

http://www.pappadeaux.com/home/

Potager Cafe  (map it!)

315 S Mesquite St

Arlington, TX 76010

(817) 861-2292

http://www.potagercafe.com/

Babe’s Chicken Dinner House  (map it!)

230 N Center St

Arlington, TX 76011

(817) 801-0300

http://www.babeschicken.com/

Humperdinks Restaurant & Brewpub  (map it!)

700 Six Flags Dr

Arlington, TX 76011

(817) 640-8553

http://www.humperdinks.com/

Fuzzy's Taco Shop  (map it!)

4201 W Green Oaks Blvd

Arlington, TX 76016

(817) 265-8226

http://www.fuzzystacoshop.com/locations/30039-fuzzys-taco-shop-arlington-tx

Local Entertainment

Six Flags Over Texas  (map it!)

2201 Road to Six Flags

Arlington, TX 76010

(817) 530-6000

http://www.sixflags.com/overTexas/index.aspx

Lodging

Sheraton Arlington Hotel  (map it!)

1500 Convention Center Drive

Arlington, TX 76011

(817) 261-8200

http://www.starwoodhotels.com/sheraton/property/overview/index.html?propertyID=3175

Courtland Marriott Arlington  (map it!)

1500 Nolan Ryan Expy

Arlington, TX 76011

(817) 277-2774

http://www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/dalal-courtyard-dallas-arlington-entertainment-district/

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