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Oracle Arena

Oakland, CA

Home of the Golden State Warriors

3.7

3.6

Oracle Arena (map it)
7000 Coliseum Way
Oakland, CA 94621


Golden State Warriors website

Oracle Arena website

Year Opened: 1966

Capacity: 19,596

There are no tickets available at this time.

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Dub Nation

Over the last few years, Oracle Arena has been welcomed into more living rooms than nearly any other arena in the NBA. Between the constant national broadcasts and the Warriors’ deep playoff runs, the world has had a peek into the arena in Oakland and all the stars put on shows on a nightly basis. The team has won championships in 1947, 1956, 1975 and 2015.

The Warriors began their existence in 1946 in Philadelphia as part of the Basketball Association of America and then went on to be one of the founding clubs of the now, National Basketball Association. With Wilt Chamberlain in tow, the team moved west to San Francisco in 1962 where they played in at The Cow Palace, just south of the city in Daly City, CA. After 1964, the team moved downtown to the San Francisco Civic Auditorium (now Bill Graham Civic Auditorium after the famed concert promoter). During this time, they also played games at USF's Memorial Gym. Starting in 1966, the team bounced around between the Cow Palace, Civic Auditorium, Oakland Coliseum Arena and even San Diego Sports Arena. The team finally settled in Oakland at the now Oracle Arena in 1971 and changed their name from the San Francisco Warriors to the Golden State Warriors.

Originally named Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum Arena, Oracle Arena was renovated during the 1996-97 season. During this time, they played at San Jose Arena (now SAP Center). Before being home to the Warriors, the arena was host to the ABA’s Oakland Oaks and was the home of the NHL’s Oakland/California Golden Seals from 1967-76.

Even during the lean years, and there were decades, the arena has had a mystique that the home team has enjoyed. Though they have had sold out crowds for several years, new ownership who has re-energized the team with talent on the court and in the front office, has decided to move the team from Oakland to San Francisco. Many people believe that was always their plan when they purchased it though they feigned overtures to the city of Oakland. They originally announced a stadium opening date of 2017 at Piers 30/32 back in 2012. They have since abandoned that site in favor of another site, still along the water, in San Francisco’s growing Mission Bay neighborhood. Most of the new buildings going up over there are high rise luxury apartments and buildings housing tech companies. They broke ground on Chase Center in January 2017 in a ridiculous over-the-top ceremony that involved dancing cranes and construction workers and hope to open in time for the 2019 season. There’s no doubt this showmanship will be reflective in the move from Oakland to San Francisco, from substance to fluff. You can follow their progress here.

3.7

What is FANFARE?

The FANFARE scale is our metric device for rating each stadium experience. It covers the following:

  • Food & Beverage
  • Atmosphere
  • Neighborhood
  • Fans
  • Access
  • Return on Investment
  • Extras

Each area is rated from 0 to 5 stars with 5 being the best. The overall composite score is the "FANFARE Score".

Food & Beverage    4

Both the price and quality of the food has been steadily increasing for the last few years. There are now more options than there ever have been at Oracle. Some of the more unique options include a banh mi sandwich cart (pork, chicken and tofu options) and a Dungeness crab sandwich ($16!).

Even the basic items such as pizza, hot dogs and nachos have gotten a lot better recently in terms of quality. I know they changed their concessions vendor a few years back so that may be reflective of that. Still, simple things such as a soft pretzel is $5.50, and a variety of salads range from $10 to $13. 20-ounce craft beers go for $13 and 24 ounce cans of domestic beer go for $12.50.

Atmosphere    5

It's hard to describe, but the combination of Steph Curry's play and the fans can turn a basketball game into something else entirely, like a church revival meeting a dance party. The oohs and ahs become a character. It's partly the fans but it's also partly the compact gym.

Even though the arena is over 45 years old the exterior façade and the interior aesthetics don't show their age as you might think. The "x" pattern around the building is a modern look and the renovated concourses are quite nice, albeit narrow.

It's a tad cramped in the seating area which can be uncomfortable but also allows fans to feel right on top of the action. Oracle has great sightlines for game action and fans from any part of the arena can watch with ease. The one bummer about sitting in the second level is the angle that the ceiling comes down to a point above center court. This creates a blockage that fans can't see through to the fans on the other side of the court.

Neighborhood    1

Quite frankly there is nothing within walking distance to the arena. This is the only destination on game nights. People either arrive by car and park in the parking lot, or arrive by public transportation and get off at the Coliseum BART station.

Many people are concerned with the neighborhood near the arena but I don't see it as a threat, if for no reason than that there is no reason to be wandering around over there anyhow. There are no restaurants or bars, only industrial warehouses and low-income housing. The closest thing to food destinations is on Hegenberger where you can find fast food, a Denny's and a few hotels due to its proximity to the Oakland International Airport (OAK).

The closest thing to a neighborhood of businesses is the overpass that connects BART to the Coliseum complex. As you walk from the train to the arena you will find a ton of people out there buying/selling tickets, as well as knock-off apparel, beer/water, and of course, bacon-wrapped hot dogs (a Mission District staple).

The good news is that you're a short trip from other Oakland neighborhoods that can provide pre or post-game meals and suds. Oakland continues to pop up on publications' "best of" lists of great places to visit. Good neighborhoods to visit are Lake Merritt, Dimond, Uptown and Rockridge. All of them have great bars, restaurants and shopping.

And of course, San Francisco is a 15 minute BART ride away.

Fans    5

Warriors fans have been through so many down years and still turn out in droves that it would be difficult to give them any other score than a five.

Part of what sets Warriors fans apart from other fans in the Bay Area is that they represent the entire region and fans need not pick sides. While residents need to choose between the 49ers and Raiders in football, and the Giants and A's in baseball, people come together behind their lovable losers, now winners.

One of the other things that I've noticed over the last couple of years is the international influence of the crowd. People are traveling from all over the globe to see the Warriors. The mixing of locals and internationals create quite a party-like atmosphere.

The fans are plenty knowledgeable, loyal and loud. They understand the nuances of the game with the fans of the best teams in the NBA. Their current success has catapulted a great game day experience into another stratosphere. Truthfully however, the fans would be given a "5" score at any point over the last 20 years.

I must say, I've never heard another arena that gets as loud.

Access    4

By car: Just exit I-880 on 66th or Hegenberger and follow the signs to the parking lot and fork over your 40 bucks.

By BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit): From San Francisco, buy a $4.20 one-way ticket ($1.95 from downtown Oakland), board either a Dublin/Pleasanton or Fremont train and exit at Coliseum/Airport. Take the walking overpass over San Leandro Avenue to the arena. The arena is also accessible from Richmond and Pittsburgh via BART, from Oakland and the East Bay via AC Transit and Sacramento via the Capitol Corridor Amtrak train.

Oracle is truly the most convenient major stadium in the Bay Area to get to. However, there are issues getting around the concourses inside. Foot traffic creates a lot of congestion and lines to get food and into the team stores spill out into the walkways. Even as they try to move venues, the Warriors have invested in improving this at Oracle by building add-ons to the arena that are bars so that some people gravitate away from the concession carts and into the bars away from the walkways.

Return on Investment    3

A trip to a Warriors game used to present an excellent value. Even still, it's an experience that any basketball fan should seek out once or twice because of the insane atmosphere. However, it presents big challenges to go often or for a big family. There are over 35,000 people on the season ticket holder wait list for a venue with less than 20,000 seats and 14,000 current season ticket holders. This will create a get-in price on the secondary market for no less than $50 for the worst seats on off-nights. Be prepared to spend $50-$150 for tickets in the upper level and $100-$500 for the lower level. Courtside seats are several thousand.

Food has increased steadily over the last few years and parking is now $40. Even the BART parking lot that used to be free, is now $10. The saving grace is how special the arena is and how different it is from other NBA arenas in terms of fans and atmosphere. It sure would be tough to take a family of four to a game but it might be worth it occasionally.

Extras    4

The Warriors do a lot of in-game entertainment to keep the crowd going. This consists of the Warriors Dance Team, hype team and emcee. I personally don't enjoy the emcee but many fans do.

The retired numbers are #13 Wilt Chamberlain, #14 Tom Meschery, #16 Al Attles, #17 Chris Mullin, #24 Rick Barry, and #42 Nate Thurmond. They're displayed next to their four championship banners at one end of the arena.

About 3 or 4 times a game, fans have chances to win prizes or cash by playing games or making trick shots. Based on the team's performance, fans can win gift certificates for haircuts, smoothies, tacos, etc. to redeem at local establishments. These are fun ways to keep everyone in the arena engaged.

If you're someone who enjoys celebrity sightings, this is a nightly occurrence in Oakland now. The final extra is for the fans. There aren't enough words to distinguish this fan base from others in the NBA.

Final Thoughts

It behooves you to get to Oracle in the next few years prior to the team moving to San Francisco. I'm sure the move to San Francisco will bring with it a top-notch experience unlike any other in the NBA, but it will also be unlike what is currently happening over at the Coliseum complex.

two quick tips:

-the safety concerns mentioned in this article are, in my opinion, overblown. That is not to say that the arena is in the nicest area, rather that you'll still be safe in spite of it. Also, the reviewer is certainly correct that there won't be a place to grab a drink near the arena as the area is heavily industrial and along major commuting thoroughfares.

-because of the heavy commuter traffic, public transportation is also an option, and a cheaper one at that. Most notably is Bay Area Rapid Transit (commonly referred to as BART). It has stops all along the East Bay as well as connections in downtown San Francisco. Oracle Arena is also served by AC Transit buses and the Capital Corridor Amtrak train.

by ryannorris | Jan 10, 2011 08:23 PM

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Crowd Reviews

Meeting the Oracle

Total Score: 3.57

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

As a general rule, when one is presented with the opportunity to see an "Oracle", one would be wise to accept the invite.

Neo knew it, so did Skywalker.

Both journeyed into previously unknown arenas in order to meet with an entity considered to possess (and the willingness to share) some type of prophecy or enlightenment. The voyage to visit the Oracle is never easy. The Oracle tends to reside in very unfamiliar and foreign territory - a Matrix, the Dagobah System or Oakland for example. Once these obstacles are overcome however, the juice tends to be worth the squeeze as the "seeker" learns valuable lessons that benefit him down the line.

It can be said that a visit to Oracle Arena, home of the Golden State Warriors, fits that mold.
I arrived at the outskirts of the Arena two hours before a 7:30 tip with the Utah Jazz. This was to be the final home game of the season for the Warriors and I had hoped to spend this time at a local watering hole or grill, soaking up some pre-game ambiance with die-hard fans. Unfortunately for me though, this part of Oakland did not lend itself to hospitality.

I spent the better part of an hour circling the Arena, expanding my search block-by-block until I was nowhere near where I should be. Some places looked open yet the swathes of local, indigenous population posted out front made entry risky. I decided to work my way back towards Oracle Arena, determined to find some food. I passed a Q_ _znos (the "U" and the "I" were gone, not out, but gone) and a few other fast-food joints. It appeared that I would be forced to meet my Oracle on an empty stomach.

Oracle Arena shares a massive Parking lot with the Oakland Coliseum, home to the A's and Raiders. Through my fruitless prior journey for sustenance, I surmised that these lots were the only places made available for parking - probably a good thing considering the neighborhoods I was in. I paid $18 to park, foregoing the option to park in the "VIP" lot for two bucks more. The difference in walking distance was minute.

After parking my car, I entered the standard scalper's gauntlet. A scene not unfamiliar to any major sporting venue yet made more harrowing due to the general lawlessness of the surrounding region. On a lighter note, not only was I harangued for tickets, I was also offered an opportunity to purchase a "mix-tape", donate some change and bum a cigarette in the span of a mere two minutes.
I headed towards will-call to pick-up my ticket which I had purchased through the Warriors website a few hours prior. I showed the booth attendant the requisite ID (driver's license and credit card used for purchase), was promptly issued my ticket and headed towards the team store located below the East entrance. The store was relatively tiny but well stocked with jerseys, tees, lids and framed Warriors autographed artwork. The prices were slashed as a result of it being the final home game of the season. Merchandise needed to be moved and the prices reflected it.

I left the store and headed up the open-air concourse towards the gate. I was still miserably early and hunger pangs were setting in. I waited with other early bird's at the gate, serenaded by an impressive audio loop of Warriors season and franchise highlights. What it supplied in quality and depth it lacked in overall length and after about 15 minutes I had heard it one too many times. Who knew Kelenna Azubuike had so many highlights?

I finally entered the Arena, shook the last hour off and was welcomed by a booming program Hawker whose voice followed me down the somewhat tight but well stocked corridors. I tend to like to head right to my seat, eager to see what vantage my $25 got me - turns out not great. I found my seat in the last row of section 205, it was not terrible but there were some drawbacks. The ceiling at Oracle slopes aggressively and confusingly downward, starting 10 feet above my head and finishing its descent, from my vantage point, right in front of the video board. I could see it, but a spotlight crows-nest (one of six that hang down at Oracle) made it tough. The view of the court was fine though and I didn't miss any of the action.

The Oracle Awaits

Total Score: 3.71

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

Opened in 1966, Oakland's Oracle Arena has been the full-time home to the Golden State Warriors since 1971. It sits 3 miles Northeast of Oakland International Airport and is the next-door neighbor to the O.co Coliseum. It is situated along Interstate 880, a major commuting thoroughfare that connects San Jose and Sacramento.

Surrounded by a particularly worn-down part of the city, the Oracle acts as a shining light for a passionate basketball community. Through the years of irrelevance, the fans continued to turn out to support their Warriors. All this came to a head when the Warriors made the playoffs in 2007, their first appearance in 12 seasons, and upset the first place Dallas Mavericks in stunning and exciting fashion. That playoff run created an atmosphere unmatched in recent memory and showed the rest of the league just how engaged Warriors fans are.

A 1996 renovation modernized the interior of the arena and added over 4,000 seats to its capacity, which now tops out at 19,596. The result is sleeker, more visually appealing corridors with updated amenities and a re-vamped upper level. The aesthetic of the arena contrasts greatly with that of their Coliseum neighbors. The retired numbers read as followed: 13 Wilt Chamberlain, 14 Tom Meschery, 16 Alvin Attles, 24 Rick Barry, 42 Nate Thurmond.

With the abilitiy to adjust to different events, Oracle Arena hosts major concerts and has been the home to other professional sports teams over the years. Most notable of which was the NHL's California Golden Seals during their time in the Bay Area.

There is no shortage of kiosks to buy food, beverages or souvenirs as they're in every corridor. Just shell out $65 and a royal blue Warriors sweatshirt is yours. Too warm for long-sleeves? Blue isn't your color? Well then, how does a 24 oz Sierra Nevada for $12 sound? Splendid.

Though I've attended dozens of games at Oracle, the night in question (or reviewed) is the January 12th matchup against the Los Angeles Lakers. Oracle was rocking, emotions were high, and the energy level was perfect for NBA basketball.

So, Sierra Nevada in tow, I made my way to my perch. My seat was 14 rows deep in the second level at half-court, a $40 single-game value.

Roaracle

Total Score: 3.71

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 4

Just six years after winning their last NBA championship, Wilt Chamberlain and the Philadelphia Warriors picked up and moved cross-country to Northern California and became known as the San Francisco Warriors. During their first few years they played a majority of their games at the Cow Palace, just south of the San Francisco border. After a few years they moved their main home court downtown to the San Francisco Civic Auditorium near City Hall. It was during these years that they donned the famed “The City” jerseys, still iconic in the Bay Area.

The Oakland Coliseum Arena opened in 1966 and offered newer amenities than many of the other options for the Warriors. They began to schedule more and more games in Oakland off of I-880. Eventually they would move to the Coliseum Arena full-time in 1971, also updating their moniker to the Golden State Warriors, in an attempt to represent the entirety of Northern California.

The Cow Palace still operates today for various events (rodeos, gun shows, expos, etc) and will be the home of the new ECHL franchise, the San Francisco Bulls, for the 2012-13 season.

The San Francisco Civic Auditorium has since been renamed the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium after the beloved rock concert promoter. It operates on a very limited basis as a concert venue. The Bill Graham Civic Auditorium holds 7,000 spectators.

The Oakland Coliseum Arena has since been renamed Oracle Arena and has seen the only NBA championship by the Warriors on the west coast when they swept the Washington Bullets in 1975. The arena has also been host to one of the worst stretches in NBA history as the Warriors have only made one playoff appearance in the last 18 years.

Oracle Arena has been versatile over the years as it has also hosted hockey (California Golden Seals of the NHL), indoor soccer (Golden Bay Earthquakes of the MISL I), and on occasion the California Golden Bears when Haas Pavilion was being renovated. It is also one of two major arena concert venues in the Bay Area, sharing that role with HP Pavilion.

Though the arena was renovated in 1997, many believe that the new ownership group would like to move the team back to The City. Many fans like the idea of a downtown arena near AT&T Park, many don’t want the team to leave Oakland, and still some don’t understand the necessity as Oracle is a legitimate venue in its own right. In any case, all of the Warriors big press conferences since Joe Lacob and Peter Guber took over have been in San Francisco, perhaps a sign of things to come.

The Best Fans in the NBA

Total Score: 3.71

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

Just six years after winning their last NBA championship, Wilt Chamberlain and the Philadelphia Warriors picked up and moved cross-country to Northern California and became known as the San Francisco Warriors. During their first few years they played a majority of their games at the Cow Palace, just south of the San Francisco border. After a few years they moved their main home court downtown to the San Francisco Civic Auditorium near City Hall. It was during these years that they donned the famed “The City” jerseys, still iconic in the Bay Area.

The Oakland Coliseum Arena opened in 1966 and offered newer amenities than many of the other options for the Warriors. They began to schedule more and more games in Oakland off of I-880 in the East Bay. Eventually they would move to the Coliseum Arena full-time in 1971, also updating their moniker to the Golden State Warriors, in an attempt to represent the entirety of Northern California.

The Cow Palace still operates today for various events (rodeos, gun shows, expos, etc) and became the home of the new ECHL franchise San Francisco Bulls.

The San Francisco Civic Auditorium has since been renamed the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium after the beloved rock concert promoter. It operates on a very limited basis as a concert venue. The Bill Graham Civic Auditorium holds 7,000 spectators.

The Oakland Coliseum Arena has since been renamed Oracle Arena and was the Warriors home for their only NBA championship on the west coast when they swept the Washington Bullets in 1975 (although the games were held at the Cow Palace for the NBA Finals due to concert scheduling). The arena has also been host to one of the worst stretches in NBA history as the Warriors have not had very many winning seasons in the last 20 years.

Oracle Arena has been versatile over the years as it has also hosted hockey (California Golden Seals of the NHL), indoor soccer (Golden Bay Earthquakes of the MISL), and on occasion the California Golden Bears when Haas Pavilion was being renovated. It is also one of two major arena concert venues in the Bay Area, sharing that role with HP Pavilion.

Though the arena was renovated in 1997, the new ownership group, led by Joe Lacob and Peter Guber, has announced plans to relocate to The City for the 2017 season. They have pinned a location at Piers 30/32, just south of the Bay Bridge and a few blocks away from AT&T Park.

DubNation

Total Score: 3.57

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

Built in 1966 and renovated in 1996, the Roarcle is still a relatively compact arena with loud fans. Concourses are narrow, so get there early if you want to tour around. If you are sitting up high in the end zones, the sloping roof will prevent you from seeing the stat boards on the other side. You can drive or take BART, traffic moved well enough after the game and the arena is right next to I-880. Nothing worth seeing in the area, which is not particularly safe at night.

Dub Nation

Total Score: 3.43

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 4

The Golden State Warriors are at the top of the basketball world right now. They lead the league in highlight reel plays and play in one of the most raucous environments in the NBA. 2014-15 marked their first NBA title in 40 years and they are poised to continue their success.

Of course it hasn’t always been like this. For much of the last 40 years, the Warriors have rarely even been an average NBA team. Rather, they have been at or near the bottom of the standings most of those years.

Just six years after winning their last NBA championship on the east coast, Wilt Chamberlain and the Philadelphia Warriors picked up and moved cross-country to Northern California and became known as the San Francisco Warriors. During their first few years they played a majority of their games at the Cow Palace, just south of the San Francisco border. After a few years they moved their main home court downtown to the San Francisco Civic Auditorium near City Hall. It was during these years that they donned the famed “The City” jerseys, still iconic in the Bay Area.

The Oakland Coliseum Arena opened in 1966 and offered newer amenities than many of the other options for the Warriors. They began to schedule more and more games in Oakland off of I-880 in the East Bay. Eventually they would move to the Coliseum Arena full-time in 1971, also updating their moniker to the Golden State Warriors, in an attempt to represent the entirety of Northern California.

The Cow Palace still operates today for various events (rodeos, gun shows, expos, etc) and most recently was the home to the short-lived ECHL franchise, San Francisco Bulls. The San Francisco Civic Auditorium has since been renamed the Bill Graham Civic Auditorium after the beloved rock concert promoter. It operates on a very limited basis as a concert venue. The Bill Graham Civic Auditorium holds 7,000 spectators.

Though the arena was renovated in 1997, the new ownership group, led by Joe Lacob and Peter Guber, announced a move back to The City in time for 2017-18 season. A few delays later, the ownership group have settled on a plot of land in San Francisco’s up-and-coming Mission Bay neighborhood. Though progress is slow, it seems this plan has legs since they have privately-purchased the land from Salesforce. The arena will be called Chase Center.

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