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O.co Coliseum

Oakland, CA

Home of the Oakland Athletics

2.7

2.9

O.co Coliseum (map it)
7000 Coliseum Way
Oakland, CA 94621


Oakland Athletics website

O.co Coliseum website

Year Opened: 1966

Capacity: 35,067

There are no tickets available at this time.

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An Oakland Relic

It's easy to forget that the Athletics brand is one of the most storied franchises in all of baseball. With time on its side, you could argue that it's one of the most famous brands in all of sports. With 9 World Series titles dating back to the Connie Mack days in Philadelphia and boasting some all time baseball legends in their history, the A's were once a rock of baseball success and stability.

Fast forward to present day, and the A's are considered a small market team in desperate need of a new stadium. Easy to overlook in today's MLB and even in the Bay Area where the nearby Giants have dominated the scene as of late, very few seem to remember the glory of the A's past.

In that regard, O.co Coliseum is a perfect representation of the Oakland Athletics franchise. The once proud ballpark is now dilapidated and rests in a less than savory part of town. Green tarps cover up a huge section of seats that are generally unfilled to lower the capacity of the park. What once was for the Athletics franchise and O.co Coliseum alike seems a distant memory.

O.co opened in 1966 as home to the Oakland Raiders of the NFL, a team that has followed a similar trajectory of storied success to down on their luck disgrace. In 1968, the Athletics moved from Kansas City to occupy the beautiful new ballpark. The A's were promptly met with success, winning 3 straight World Series titles starting in 1972. Since then the stadium has seen tenants come and go (or go and come back if you're talking about the Raiders), including random San Jose Earthquakes games, numerous concerts, all-star games and massive events. Through all of it's history and numerous formal name changes, to locals it has simply been known as the Coliseum.

2.7

What is FANFARE?

The FANFARE scale is our metric device for rating each stadium experience. It covers the following:

  • Food & Beverage
  • Atmosphere
  • Neighborhood
  • Fans
  • Access
  • Return on Investment
  • Extras

Each area is rated from 0 to 5 stars with 5 being the best. The overall composite score is the "FANFARE Score".

Food & Beverage    3

Concession stands seem packed into the narrow concourses that were not quite built for today's variety of food offerings at most MLB parks. You can tell that the A's organization has done their best to meet the growing demands of baseball fans in this area while battling the constraints of the ballpark itself. Ovations is the company that has recently taken over concessions here and has done everything in it's power to bring fresh offerings to the ballpark.

There are plenty of food options jammed into these narrow and congested halls, although it may seem like there are more than reality due to that same congestion. Brick oven pizza ($11) in the West Side Club, burritos, nachos ($5.50 and up), hot dogs ($5.25), polish sausage ($6.75) and barbecue are some of the variety you'll find around the park.

Drink options are pretty generic and consist largely of soda and bottled water with coffee as an additional option. Beer is mostly your big brand kinds, but the West Side Club section has a craft beer stand where you can find all kinds of local varieties for $11.25 in a souvenir cup.

Ideally, the West Side Club area is where you want to call home for food. A delicious brick oven pizza and a local beer will hit the spot.

Atmosphere    3

Far from the best atmosphere in baseball, O.co isn't completely without it's charm. Hidden in the antiquated structure is an overall solid game day experience.

Unfortunately, the news starts bad. The stadium itself doesn't hold much to get excited about. It's a large concrete structure rising from an old parking lot. The entrances don't help either, as there is very little of the ambiance of other great major league ballparks. Concrete portals lead into narrow concrete concourses. Until you get your site of the field, there is nothing good to see. The field itself is as beautiful as any in the majors, but, the stadium is largely cookie cutter and old.

The fans however are a more special variety. Tailgating is a common sight outside the park, and flags and singing is a common sight inside the park. The weather will always be comfortable and the "Home of the Oakland Athletics" tarp stretched over the upper deck behind home plate (although covering an attendance issue) adds a touch of character to an otherwise dull stadium.

You'll have plenty of options for seats in this park as games don't often sell out. The outfield bleachers seem to be the best bet though, as they give you the view of the only unique characteristics of the park while setting you close to the more passionate fans.

Neighborhood    1

Let's just say, don't wander too far off the stadium grounds here. For a pro ballpark, O.co rests in one of the worst neighborhoods you could find. You'll want to hop right off 880 to catch the game, and hop right back on after. Otherwise, you'll find yourself in a sea of graffiti, shopping carts and unfortunate settings.

Immediately around the stadium there is absolutely no options to eat. Oakland itself is a pretty large city, so there are some decent areas to grab a bite to eat before or after the game. Head over to downtown for some of the best dining, but areas like Temescal, Lakeshore and Rockridge offer up variety as well.

In terms of attractions, Oakland doesn't possess a lot. Across the Bay Bridge in San Francisco you'll find a huge variety of options, but that's home to a completely different team. There is a decent craft beer scene in the Oakland area and Napa/Sonoma aren't particularly far north either. These might be your best bets.

My honest advice on where to stay is across the bridge in San Francisco for variety of things to do or further south near San Jose for affordability. With so many great cities within a 30 minute radius, I probably wouldn't recommend staying in Oakland.

Fans    3

While few in number in a small venue, the A's fans are actually quite passionate. Tailgating and singing/chanting are common sites at A's games, which is something that can't be said for all major league parks. The large lot outside the stadium will be full of tailgaters waving flags and sporting green and yellow.

Unfortunately, A's fans typically rank very low in attendance. Currently, the A's rank 25 out of 30 MLB teams in attendance which paints a picture beyond their passionate fan base. This is more likely due to the lack of external support resulting from the poor stadium and location. The hardcore A's fans turn out in their numbers consistently, but it's hard to draw the casual fan to the Coliseum when the Giants have their shiny new ballpark across the bay.

But that doesn't discourage the green and yellow masses from doing their best to make it a spectacle. The outfield bleachers will be packed with these throngs of fans making noise, cheering, booing, singing and whatever else they can do to get into the game. They embrace their small market reputation and wear it as a badge, even with potentially uncertain future on where their team will end up.

Access    4

It's surprisingly easy to get to O.co, just don't make a wrong turn. It's an oasis of where you want to be surrounded by places you don't want to be.

One of the nicest access benefits is that the BART (the Bay Area transit) drops off right next to the stadium and even gives you a direct walkway over the main street for access. Buses and trains both stop at the stadium as well, making it easy to get here from anywhere.

If you're driving, head straight up or down 880 (depending on where you're coming from) and you can hop off almost directly into the large parking lot. Parking is $20 and the lot is more than large enough to accommodate the masses.

While not pretty, access to the stadium is relatively easy. There is a pretty significant security checkpoint complete with metal detectors, but traffic moves through pretty easily. There are multiple gates, but your choice of transit will generally funnel you to the gate you need to get to.

The one downside is the narrow, congested concourse. With concessions packed into the area, lines will typically make it difficult to walk around the stadium. In general, the stadium is old and dirty, but once you get to your seat it will all seem fine.

Return on Investment    3

This really depends on what you're looking for. Tickets for an A's game are generally pretty cheap and can start as low as $13. But the stadium is nowhere near MLB ballpark expectations.

Parking is $20 and food is about average (if not a little bit more) than most MLB parks. If you're showing up to sit in the stands and take in a grass roots baseball experience, O.co will do just fine. If you're looking for an overall great day at a beautiful venue, you can probably skip this one.

Extras    2

History is basically the one thing Athletics fans have to cling to. Title banners, retired numbers from incredibly recognizable names and various other shrines to the great tradition of the organization can be seen all around the park. It's about the only thing that makes this ballpark stand out from the otherwise generic venue. Extras don't abound here, so if you're looking for unique amenities then O.co will come up short.

Final Thoughts

While O.co has its place in history and pieces of charm, it's also probably the most "skippable" ballpark in the majors. The Giants beautiful new park is across the bay and Oakland isn't a town for your average tourist. There's nothing particularly special to see here, and if you're in it for the experience you can probably feel comfortable just moving on to the next stop on the list. A proud club like the Athletics deserves better, and hopefully someday they'll get it

Do They Know the Way to San Jose?

Will the A's move to San Jose, or are there other options that would keep them in Oakland, but deliver them the new park that they need?

by paul | Jun 07, 2011 12:47 PM

O.Co Coliseum

As ridiculous as Overstock.com Coliseum sounds, the company just released news that they're going to now call it "O.Co Coliseum". I feel bad for these fans, especially since there seems to be diehards out there.

by shamus170 | Jun 08, 2011 01:47 PM

RE: Do They Know the Way to San Jose?

The truth is Oakland is probably the more viable option since they've put together several plans and the Giants own the rights to San Jose. The city of Oakland has tried to convince the owners to simply listen to them and they refuse, stating there are no viable options in the East Bay. They want to move to San Jose and won't put a legitimate team on the field until they do so. Lew Wolff who also owns the Earthquakes is from there and will do anything to bring the A's to the Silicon Valley. As a fan it's particularly brutal since they alienate the fans as much as possible and then blame them for having to move. The A's have never drawn a ton of fans but attendance has dropped steadily since the Fisher-Wolff regime took over. At the end of the day a move to San Jose, though I don't believe it's necessary, would at least keep the A's in the Bay Area and that's what's important.

by ryannorris | Jun 08, 2011 04:32 PM

100% Baseball

Although the stadium itself is not much to write home about, the baseball experience - really baseball - matches few other MLB stadiums I've attended.

It was all about the game, which I found refreshing.

by megminard | Jun 10, 2011 09:24 PM

Enough is Enough

I wish they would stop re-naming this hunk of junk, and just tear it down already. There are really very few MLB teams left that truly NEED a new stadium, but this is definitely one of them.

by paul | Jul 25, 2011 06:26 PM

Naming Rights

I just read that overstock is paying only $7 million over the course of 6 years for the naming rights to the coliseum! Aren't these sponsorship deals multi-million-dollar transactions? This is for just over $1 million a year! Why bother even changing the name for the price of a 35-year-old shortstop? It just sounds bush league.

by ryannorris | Aug 04, 2011 11:26 PM

NAME?

Why is everyone so worried about the name of the stadium? It's the Coliseum! If someone wants to dump a few million in to put their name on the old place, let them. It's still The Coliseum.

I went back for my second time Sunday. Everything about it tells you it's a DUMP BUT, I still love watching a game there?!?! You arrive from AirBart at the Awful looking Bart terminal, walk across the bridge to be met with razor wire, buy your ticket to looks like a Prison, walk into a tarp covered upper deck...the marine layer is still covering the area and it looks MORE drab then can be imagined. OK, so, I bought my $12 ticket for the third deck, $6 food voucher for the over priced food and I'm all set.

I buy my dog and coke, walk out and the SUN comes out, the game is starting and the Fans are already yelling at the players! The MUSIC is great, Sound system is GREAT, the game is GREAT. The Fans are GREAT, good ones and bad ones, they're INTO IT!

Stadium is a PIT but it was a GREAT experience. I would rather go to a game like that then a Dbacks game. It was FUN and everyone seemed to be having a good time. Fans voiced their opinions ......

Hey Oakland, ENJOY YOUR TEAM. They put on a good show.

by Dbacker | Aug 07, 2012 09:56 AM

The dog liked it

The good news is that I don't feel awkward bringing my dog to this stadium on the annual dog day. Given that the visitors' locker room occasionally fills with sewage, what is the worst that could happen? I enjoy the A's and the team does what it can with the stadium, but hopefully soon it will be listed only in the NFL section. These guys deserve an actual baseball park. Having seen all 30, it is hands down the worst of the lot.

by sjc_giant | Jul 10, 2015 01:11 PM

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Crowd Reviews

O.co Coliseum & the Oakland Athletics

Total Score: 2.86

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 1

The newly named O.co Coliseum is a multi-purpose facility in Oakland, California and the home of the Oakland Athletics. It first opened its gates to the Oakland Raiders in 1966 and the Athletics in 1968 when they moved west from Kansas City.

Occasionally referred to as The Mausoleum, this gargantuan concrete monster is one of only two stadiums that still operate for both NFL and MLB teams. When the Raiders moved back to Oakland from Los Angeles for the 1996 NFL season an extra set of luxury suites and deck of seats were installed in center field, blocking the previously viewable Oakland Hills. This has prompted the behemoth's nickname, Mount Davis (referencing the infamous Raiders owner) to be uttered in many circles.

The ironically named O.co Coliseum shares a parking lot with Oracle Arena , home of the Golden State Warriors. Like the Warriors, the A's draw about 17,000 spectators consistently. Unlike the Warriors though, they only fill half the available seats. Green tarps cover the third deck at The Coliseum in hopes to offer a more intimate atmosphere for those particularly quiet nights, dropping its capacity to 35,067.

For more than a decade, the A's brass have been looking for a new stadium in the Bay Area. Recently they've commented on how signing potential free agents is difficult because of the outdated ballpark and the amenities provided. Visiting players consistently rank the clubhouses as some of the worst in baseball.

There is no doubt that the A's and their fans would benefit from a new park as the age of the facility and its dual purpose nature are starting to wear on fans and players alike.

Review of the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum

Total Score: 2.71

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 0

The Overstock.com Coliseum opened in 1966. It became home to the Athletics in 1968 following the franchise's move from Kansas City to Oakland. Designed as a multi-use facility, the Coliseum has, for most of its years, served as home to both the A's and the NFL's Oakland Raiders. (The Oracle Arena, home to the Golden State Warriors, sits right next door.)

A 1995 renovation, spurred by the Raiders return from Los Angeles, added over 20,000 seats. The addition, nicknamed Mount Davis for Raiders owner Al Davis, completely enclosed the field, shutting the stadium off from what used to be a beautiful view of the Oakland hills. In doing so, the last gasp of charm was squeezed out of this aging, yet purposeful ballpark.

Fans Deserve Better

Total Score: 3.00

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 4

I'm from Utah, but have some family and friends in NorCal, so I've seen the A's quite a bit for a non-native. (I'm pretty sure the place has had a different name each time I've been.)

Whenever I go, the pricing and the weather are sensational, but my spirits sink when I see "Mount Davis" dominating the area behind the fences. The organization has done the best it can to deal with it (e.g. retired numbers) but the enclosed-ness of the place is a downer.

I really feel for the die-hards who endured the transition from the wide-open view to the current set-up. Their perseverance ought to be commended. It's too bad the team will probably have to leave Oakland to get the park it wants.

No Wonder Fans Don't Care

Total Score: 2.43

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 2
  • Extras: 2

As an outsider visiting the Oakland Coliseum (I refuse to call it the O.co Coliseum), I was sorely disappointed by what is clearly an outdated stadium from an era that ballpark builders need to forget. Most of those 1960s-era cookie cutters (Shea Stadium, the Vet) are long-gone, replaced by modern ballparks designed to appeal to both the baseball purist as well as the casual fan. I took the BART to get to the stadium, but it was still an hour-long trip from San Francisco on a rickety train. I highly recommend not using Will Call if you take the train--you have to walk entirely around the stadium, which is not exactly a fun walk right after you've been standing on a noisy, smelly train for an hour. The food wasn't too bad, but there was absolutely nothing around the ballpark (or inside the ballpark) worth seeing or doing other than the action on the field. And, while I admire Billy Beane and his "Moneyball" tactics, they don't exactly make for the most exciting on-field product. Long story short, the Coliseum is very similar to the Athletics product on the field--not too bad looking from the outside, but sorely lacking and in need of a major facelift once you get to know it.

The Coliseum

Total Score: 3.00

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 2

The O.co Coliseum is a multi-purpose facility in Oakland, California and the home of the Oakland Athletics. It first opened its gates, as the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum, to the Oakland Raiders in 1966 and the Athletics in 1968 when they moved west from Kansas City.

Occasionally referred to as The Mausoleum, this gargantuan concrete monster, made popular in the 70s and 80s, is the only stadium that still operates for both NFL and MLB teams. When the Raiders moved back to Oakland from Los Angeles for the 1996 NFL season an extra set of luxury suites and deck of seats were installed in center field, blocking the previously viewable Oakland Hills. You could even see on to the field from the BART approach, a very cool feel. This has prompted the behemoth's nickname, Mount Davis (referencing the infamous late-Raiders owner) to be uttered in many circles.

The Coliseum shares a parking lot with Oracle Arena, home of the Golden State Warriors. Like the Warriors, the A's draw about 17,000 spectators consistently. Unlike the Warriors though, they only fill half the available seats. Green tarps cover the third deck at The Coliseum in hopes to offer a more intimate atmosphere for those particularly quiet nights, dropping its capacity to 35,067. However, for big games like the Bay Bridge series against the Giants, or when the Red Sox and Yankees come to town, they still don’t remove the tarps to up the capacity. Many believe this is a way of keeping their average attendance low as even a half dozen games of over 50,000 patrons would make a bit of a difference on the mean.

For more than a decade, the A's brass have been looking for a new stadium in the Bay Area. Recently they've commented on how signing potential free agents is difficult because of the outdated ballpark and the amenities provided. Visiting players consistently rank the clubhouses as some of the worst in baseball. Recently former A’s second baseman Mark Ellis noted that none of the Dodgers players enjoy their time in Oakland. This is perhaps two-fold as Los Angeles was swept by Oakland in late June.

There is no doubt that the A's and their fans would benefit from a new park as the age of the facility and its dual purpose nature are starting to wear on fans and players alike. However, the Coliseum has a ton of historical significance as the Raiders have won two of their three Super Bowls and the A’s four World Series’ while calling the Coliseum home. Beyond that it has been the home to the Oakland Invaders (USFL), and the Oakland Clippers and Stompers of the NASL. Teenagers and young adults of the 70s and 80s will remember it as the home to the “Days on the Green” concert series presented by famed San Francisco Bay Area promoter Bill Graham.

Do you know the way to San Jose?

Total Score: 3.14

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 3

The Coliseum is the fourth oldest ballpark in the majors and one of two remaining stadiums that is also used for football (Rogers Centre is the other). The Coliseum has gone through several name changes in the past decade, but the locals have always referred to it as The Coliseum.

It is located just east of I-880 and has several large parking lots surrounding it along with Oracle Arena, home of the Golden State Warriors. Parking for A's games is $17 (except on Tuesdays when it's free). There is also a BART station that provides easy access on public transit. Tailgating is allowed here and many fans take advantage, with some arriving for day games over two hours in advance. The parking lot also houses the extra seats that are used when the Raiders play.

There is nothing of interest around the stadium other than a small planter near the Westside Club that commemorates the history of all three franchises that call Oakland home.

Tickets are reasonably priced. I recommend the Value Deck seats as they include $6 worth of food. A Saag's sausage is $5.75 which fits nicely with this promotion and if you sign up for the designated driver program to get a free pop, you don't need to buy a drink. So you can see the game and have a meal for $12, assuming you don't park. The Value Deck seats are located in the third deck. Of course, you don't have to sit there, you can move freely about the stadium, although ushers do check your tickets on occasion.

The Coliseum has the lowest capacity in all of MLB as they have blocked off almost all the seating in the upper deck using tarps. One advantage of these coverings is that they can put retired numbers and World Series championship years on them to at least make them slightly less ugly.

There are two concourses, both of which are fairly drab. On the second level, you will find the Westside Club which includes a full-service restaurant and bar behind sections 212-214. It was fairly empty before the game, but then again so was much of the stadium.

The lower concourse is where most of the food is, there is even an Irish Pub near section 120 (ironically, right next to the designated driver sign-up booth). Not a lot of variety in the food; I thought the Saag's sausage selection was the best value for the money, although the garlic fries were also very tempting.

Some of the lower deck seating is covered by the deck above. It gets very chilly here at night, so better to sit lower where you are in the lights. Generally avoid rows 31 and above in any of the 100 level sections down the baselines.

You probably know that the foul area is the biggest in the majors. On several occasions over the weekend I attended, foul balls that would be souvenirs in other ballparks were easy outs here.

There are two identical scoreboards at opposite ends of the stadium, essentially above the foul poles but really marking the end zones when the football stadium is in use. Each scoreboard consists of a dot matrix display and a digital scoreboard. Not fancy, but gets the job done.

Overall, The Coliseum is clearly not one of baseball's finest facilities. It is ancient, somewhat worn down, and offers few amenities, like working locker rooms. But now that nearly every other park is new/retro with more and more distractions, it is refreshing to return to an old-time experience. The fans here are real and know the game. I enjoyed my weekend here (I didn't have to park though, so saved $34 that way). With the A's perhaps bound for San Jose, your chances to see O.Co for baseball might be limited, so drop by if you can.

Surprising Experience

Total Score: 3.00

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 3

Date of visit: Wednesday, July 4, 2013 vs. Chicago Cubs (3-1 loss)

One of the worst experiences in MLB. Getting here was horrible (BART rapid transit from San Francisco was on strike) There is nothing around the area save for a few gas stations and a couple of chain restaurants. Driving down I-880 may have shown more graffiti per square mile than anywhere in the world!

The Coliseum is aging. The halls were crowded and the sightlines in places are pretty bad. However, they do what they can to dress the place up and there is green and gold everywhere. An awesome promotion this day allowed fans to watch the firework show from the field. Possibly the best fireworks show I've ever seen.

What was surprising, was how awesome the fans were. They are loud and into every pitch. Originally I thought MLB would be better off moving this team to make a second team in Tampa, but after experiencing it, the fans definitely deserve a better park!

After all of this

True Baseball Fans

Total Score: 3.00

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 2

When I last visited Oakland in 2011, the A's were not exactly setting the baseball world on fire. As such, the crowd was small and the atmosphere somewhat lacking. However, I found the fans friendly, knowledgeable and passionate. Prices were comparatively cheap, which made for great seats without breaking the bank. The food was average, although it was Free Hot Dog Thursday! The experience really was no-frills, but as an international visitor I found it fascinating to see MLB in that context. I’d definitely go back to the Coliseum next time I’m in the States, but by then I hope for the sake of the fans and the team they have a new stadium – either in Oakland or San Jose.

The Last of the Dual Purpose Stadiums

Total Score: 2.86

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 2

O.co Coliseum as currently constructed is perhaps the least visually appealing ballpark in Major League Baesball. The tarp on almost half the seating capacity and the issues with plumbing may make one wonder how a big league franchise, and a good one at that, can play their home games there. That being said, the experience at the “Coli” is different than any other and can certainly make for a fun, baseball-centric day.

O.co Coliseum is a multi-purpose facility in Oakland, California and the home of the Oakland Athletics. It first opened its gates, as the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum, to the Oakland Raiders in 1966 and the Athletics in 1968 when they moved west from Kansas City.

The Coliseum is nothing more than a concrete monster, made popular in the 70s and 80s, and the only stadium that still operates for both NFL and MLB teams. When the Raiders moved back to Oakland from Los Angeles for the 1996 NFL season an extra set of luxury suites and deck of seats were installed in center field, blocking the previously viewable Oakland Hills. You could even see onto the field from the BART approach, a very cool feel. This has prompted the behemoth's nickname, Mount Davis (referencing the infamous late-Raiders owner). The Coliseum shares a parking lot with Oracle Arena, home of the Golden State Warriors.

Green tarps cover the third deck at the Coliseum in hopes of offering a more intimate atmosphere for those particularly quiet nights, dropping its capacity to 35,067. However, for big games like the Bay Bridge series against the Giants, or when the Red Sox and Yankees come to town, they still don’t remove the tarps to up the capacity. Many believe this is a way of keeping their average attendance low as even a half dozen games of over 50,000 patrons would make a bit of a difference on the mean. Moreover, after several years out in the sun, the tarps are no longer the clean green color they once were as they have begun to fade.

For more than a decade, the A's brass have been looking for a new stadium in the Bay Area. There are conflicting viewpoints within the A’s fan base on where the team belongs plus the issues with Giants having the territorial rights to San Jose, a hotbed for corporate money.

It's clear that the blemishes of the A's venue is pronounced by the rise of beautiful ballparks across the nation over the last decade. In fact, before the Raiders moved back to Oakland, the Coliseum was a ballpark held in high esteem for its time. It is also clear that A's ownership has zero interest in making amenity upgrades in any way while they position themselves for a move to the Silicon Valley.

There is no doubt that the A's and their fans would benefit from a new park as the age of the facility and its dual purpose nature are starting to wear on fans and players alike. However, the Coliseum has a ton of historical significance as the Raiders have won two of their three Super Bowls and the A’s four World Series’ while calling the Coliseum home. Beyond that it has been the home to the Oakland Invaders (USFL), and the Oakland Clippers and Stompers of the NASL. Teenagers and young adults of the 70s and 80s will remember it as the home to the “Days on the Green” concert series presented by famed San Francisco Bay Area promoter Bill Graham.

10 More Years?

Total Score: 2.86

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 2

There is no doubt that the A’s are the team most in need of a new ballpark. The question is, is their future any more clear than it was a year ago? How about more than five years ago when Commissioner Bud Selig appointed a “blue-ribbon committee” to address the issue? The answer has been eternally, no. Are they moving to San Jose anytime soon? No. Are they building in Oakland anytime soon? No. Instead they signed a new 10 year lease at O.co Coliseum.

That being said, the experience at the “Coli” is different than any other and can certainly make for a fun, baseball-centric day.

O.co Coliseum first opened its gates, as the Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum, to the Oakland Raiders in 1966 and the Athletics in 1968 when they moved west from Kansas City.

The Coliseum is nothing more than a concrete monster, made popular in the 70s and 80s, and the only stadium that still operates for both NFL and MLB teams. When the Raiders moved back to Oakland from Los Angeles for the 1996 NFL season an extra set of luxury suites and deck of seats were installed in center field, blocking the previously viewable Oakland Hills. You could even see onto the field from the BART approach, a very cool feel. This has prompted the behemoth's nickname, Mount Davis (referencing the infamous late-Raiders owner). The Coliseum shares a parking lot with Oracle Arena, home of the Golden State Warriors.

Green tarps cover the third deck at the Coliseum in hopes of offering a more intimate atmosphere for those particularly quiet nights, dropping its capacity to 35,067. However, for big games like the Bay Bridge series against the Giants, or when the Red Sox and Yankees come to town, they still don’t remove the tarps to up the capacity. Many believe this is a way of keeping their average attendance low as even a dozen games of over 50,000 patrons would make a bit of a difference on the mean. Moreover, after several years out in the sun, the tarps are no longer the clean green color they once were as they have begun to fade.

In contrast to the perception of their ballpark, the Athletics are one of the most storied franchises in the history of professional baseball. Established in 1901, the A’s have won 9 World Series titles (5 in Philadelphia) in their history. Since Oakland, they have won the World Series 4 times, the American League Pennant 6 times and the AL Western Division 16 times.

For more than a decade, the A's brass have been looking for a new stadium in the Bay Area. There are conflicting viewpoints within the A’s fan base on where the team belongs plus the issues with Giants having the territorial rights to San Jose, a hotbed for corporate money.

It's clear that the blemishes of the A's venue is pronounced by the rise of beautiful ballparks across the nation over the last decade. In fact, before the Raiders moved back to Oakland, the Coliseum was a ballpark held in high esteem for its time. It is also clear that A's ownership has zero interest in making amenity upgrades in any way while they position themselves for a move to the Silicon Valley.

There is no doubt that the A's and their fans would benefit from a new park as the age of the facility and its dual purpose nature are starting to wear on fans and players alike. However, the Coliseum has a ton of historical significance beyond A’s success. The Raiders have won two of their three Super Bowls while calling the Coliseum home. Beyond that it has been the home to the Oakland Invaders (USFL), and the Oakland Clippers and Stompers of the NASL. Teenagers and young adults of the 70s and 80s will remember it as the home to the ”Days on the Green” concert series presented by famed San Francisco Bay Area promoter Bill Graham.

Meh

Total Score: 2.43

  • Food & Beverage: 2
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 2
  • Extras: 1

The fans are definitely some of the most passionate MLB fans that I've seen in person, but everything else is just not so great. Was interesting that there was no sign of the Raiders' existence with the exception of one ad board. Was definitely not expecting to see it almost exclusively A's, especially in late September.

Not meant for looks, but amazing nonetheless

Total Score: 3.57

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 3

O.co Coliseum is one of the oldest ballparks in the MLB today, and, well, it looks like one. But it's still amazing. The fans are THE best in baseball, the tickets are crazy cheap (tickets go as low as $2), and most of the food is good.

BART makes it simple to make the game, even if you can't/don't drive. A small fee gets you there quickly. The fans, the loudness, the intimate feeling of the ballgame, it's like you're playing. The neighborhood is pretty wack and there's no good places to eat (other than a couple bars), however. But, eating in the coliseum is no problem. They have a nice variety of foods (hot dogs, pizza, other ballpark food) and reasonable prices. You won't have to pay $5 for a water. All in all, this is my favorite ballpark to go to, and I've been to many ballparks, MLB, MiLB, college, etc.

If You Like Concrete, You Will LOVE This Park

Total Score: 2.71

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 1
  • Extras: 1

The Coliseum.........save for the one in Rome, when you say it in the U.S. you know what you are talking about. However, unlike the one in Rome, this is definitely not a landmark of any kind. Of course if you are stadium chaser, it is a must, but you must be a die-hard fan. Plenty of flaws are with this place from the excessive use of concrete cement making the place look a tad ugly, to the bathroom issues, to major sightline issues, it is without question the worst ballpark in the Majors, well behind Tampa Bay, which many consider that the worst park.

FOOD & BEVERAGE: Limited in variety, but you do have barbecue options, some different choices of hot dogs, nachos, and even a teriyaki bowl. They have a good bit of beverage selections as well. The food is tasty, such as the chicken nachos and the teriyaki bowl if you do like to eat healthy so this is one of the better things at this ballpark.

ATMOSPHERE: I will say this about Oakland: all you pretty much get here is baseball. And also, they have one of the best tailgating scenes around before the game. The fans create a great baseball atmosphere here and that is something to be said.

NEIGHBORHOOD: What neighborhood? Nothing is around.

FANS: They are a good group. They are incredibly supportive and again for a park that is massive for baseball standards, it makes you feel somewhat homely though it might not be a large crowd. They are pretty friendly as well.

ACCESS: Anywhere in the Bay Area in terms of driving on your own is bad. Most say taking the BART is a far better idea. Probably should have done that. That said, it is off the interstate and not too bad to get to if you manage to handle the traffic around the area. Parking is plentiful but expensive at $20.

ROI: Yeesh. Ticket prices are middle-of-the pack, but foods are pretty high and forget souvenirs. They are some of the highest around in baseball.

EXTRAS: I guess maybe the defining feature is the light towers of the ballpark. I can't think of much else. Maybe the grass looks greener than other spots and the employees were nice? Even the new upgraded scoreboard was a stinker. They showed no individual statistics for the players save for what they did during the game, and it was just a disappointment in how they did it.

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