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Meadowbank Stadium

Edinburgh, Scotland

Home of the Edinburgh City FC

3.0

3.0

Meadowbank Stadium (map it)
139-143 London Road
Edinburgh, Scotland EH7 6AE
United Kingdome


Edinburgh City FC website

Meadowbank Stadium website

Year Opened: 1970

Capacity: 16,000

There are no tickets available at this time.

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New Review: Edinburgh City FC

The year 2016 became a significant landmark in the history of Edinburgh City Football Club when they clinched promotion to the Scottish Professional Football League (SPFL) Two. This was at the expense of East Stirlingshire who were defeated over a two legged 'winner takes all' play off, as the capital city gained another professional entry to the elite forty two clubs.

Edinburgh City were originally formed in 1928 and played in the Lothian, Edinburgh District and East of Scotland Leagues as both Amateur and Junior sides through out the early years of their formation. The club were also known as Postal United, a subsiduary of the club formed in 1966, but still under the guise of Edinburgh City.

The club have always played in the preliminary rounds of the annual Scottish Cup fixtures, and in 2013 the club resigned from the East of Scotland League to join the newly formed Scottish Lowland League, which encompassed clubs from the east, west and south of Scotland. Along with the Highland League in the very north of Scotland, both made up the new pyramid system which saw winners of both these leagues play each other over two legs, and the winner then playing the team finishing bottom of SPFL Division Two, again over two legs.

Edinburgh City nearly joined the professional league a decade ago, when they were one of the clubs considered to replace Airdrieonians in 2002 after they had gone out of business. They lost out on this occasion to Gretna FC, who themselves went out of business after a short six years in Scotland's top flight.

The club have used a number of different venues in their history. They played at City Park in the early years of their formation, then at Powderhall Stadium - an old-fashioned greyhound venue - both of which were demolished to make way for local housing and the current Meadowbank Stadium. The latter was built in the late 1960s to host the Commonwealth Games of 1970 and it was then used again to hold the same games in 1986.

In between these sporting events, the venue was used for other sports, mainly running and track cycling. An old works football team, Ferranti Thistle, started playing their home matches at Meadowbank and in 1974 the club changed its name to Meadowbank Thistle, playing there in the professional Scottish leagues until 1995. Due to financial problems the club relocated to the nearby town of Livingston and to a purpose-built facility originally known as Almondvale. The club then changed their name to Livingston FC. This left the Meadowbank Stadium with a football facility but no tenant, at whcih point Edinburgh City stepped in.

As a multi purpose venue it has hosted a number of other events, both sporting and recreational, most notably rugby union fixtures and music concerts including Simple Minds, Radiohead, Muse and The Foo Fighters.

3.0

What is FANFARE?

The FANFARE scale is our metric device for rating each stadium experience. It covers the following:

  • Food & Beverage
  • Atmosphere
  • Neighborhood
  • Fans
  • Access
  • Return on Investment
  • Extras

Each area is rated from 0 to 5 stars with 5 being the best. The overall composite score is the "FANFARE Score".

Food & Beverage    3

The food and drink options are regular football offerings and are very reasonably priced. There are hot and cold drinks, tea, coffee and juices available, with steak and scotch/meat pies at £1.50 with crisps and chocolate available for as little as 50p each.

Atmosphere    3

Meadowbank is a large open stadium with only the Main Stand used for spectators, and with only a few hundred present at home games the atmosphere can be quite subdued. On entering the turnstiles there is a lot of activity with the club shop, food outlet and toilets all in close proximity. The regulars all tend to know each other and there's a relaxed, friendly mood.

The Meadowbank Stadium is quite scenic, surrounded by trees and shrubbery. It has a capacity of 16,000, but only the Main Stand, which has 7,500 seats, is used for football. If the club were involved in a high profile competitive fixture with, say, either of their city neighbours Hearts or Hibernian, there may be an option there to use the terracing round the other three sides of the stadium, but this may not meet modern-day health and safety regulations.

The Main Stand seats have some discolouring and the aisle stairs are steep, though hand rails are provided down one side and there are plenty of seating options. Sitting in the stand looking out, behind the left goal there is a cumbersome looking scoreboard, which is quite dated.

The running track round the perimeter of the pitch puts some distance between the pitch and the stand, but as the seating is elevated it still provides a good view of the game. There are also no visible supporting pillars, so there is nothing to obscure your view regardless where you sit.

Finding a seat in the centre of the upper part of the stand provides the best view of any game as you can clearly see the action from both goals.

Neighborhood    3

The stadium is located in a very busy part of Edinburgh, very close to other famous stadiums like Easter Road, Tynecastle and Murrayfield, not to mention the new Holyrood government building.

On top of the options inside, there is a McDonald's direcly facing the stadium, and several shops further up the road.

Edinburgh is a very popular tourist destination, more so in the summer for the 'Fringe Festival,' with Edinburgh Castle, shops, pubs, cafes and its cobbled roads in the city centre the main highlights.

Fans    3

The fans of Edinburgh City are friendly and good natured. Some bring inflatable characters and dress them in the club's colours and this gets a good reaction even with the opposition fans!

The club play to crowds in the region of 400-600 for home matches.

Access    3

The local buses stop right outside the stadium. The number 4, 5, 15, 26, 44, 45, 113 buses run from the city centre to Meadowbank. The closest railway station is Waverley, but is still three miles from the stadium, so you can either bus the rest of the journey, walk or take a taxi.

Traffic can be slow due to the volume on the roads, but parking is available directly outside the stadium and street parking is also close by.

Movement around the stadium is limited as only the Main Stand is open. Only some of the entrance tunnels are open once through the turnstiles, with away fans tending to sit on the left side.

Return on Investment    4

Pricing for different ages is pretty fair as it is similar to other clubs within the league. Anyone bringing young kids will get good value, more so when you also buy from the food outlets within the stadium too.

Adult prices are £12, concessions (under 18s, students and over 65s) are £6, with U12s priced at £2.

Extras    2

The club offer a half price discount to Hearts and Hibernian supporters on production of their season ticket, which will go to help boosting Edinburgh City's home attendance and income when both those clubs are playing away.

Underneath the stand and visible on entry is an indoor running track and there are also halls for boxing and basketball, though these are not all used regularly by the public.

Final Thoughts

With Edinburgh City being promoted to the professional ranks and being the newest club in the country, a lot of groundhoppers now have a new venue to add to their list, unless they visited when Meadowbank Thistle played here. The city itself provides an incentive to visit, and it is definitely somewhere you can make a weekend of it and attend the football at a very affordable price.

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Crowd Reviews

New Review: Edinburgh City FC

Total Score: 3.00

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 2

The year 2016 became a significant landmark in the history of Edinburgh City Football Club when they clinched promotion to the Scottish Professional Football League (SPFL) Two. This was at the expense of East Stirlingshire who were defeated over a two legged 'winner takes all' play off, as the capital city gained another professional entry to the elite forty two clubs.

Edinburgh City were originally formed in 1928 and played in the Lothian, Edinburgh District and East of Scotland leagues as both Amateur and Junior sides through out the early years of their formation. The club were also known as Postal United, a subsiduary of the club formed in 1966, but still under the guise of Edinburgh City.

The club have always played in the preliminary rounds of the annual Scottish Cup fixtures, and in 2013 the club resigned from the East of Scotland League to join the newly formed Scottish Lowland League, which encompassed clubs from the east, west and south of Scotland. Along with the Highland League in the very north of Scotland, both made up the new pyramid system which saw winners of both these leagues play each other over two legs, and the winner then playing the team finishing bottom of SPFL Division Two, again over two legs.

Edinburgh City nearly joined the professional league a decade ago, when they were one of the clubs considered to replace Airdrieonians in 2002 after they had gone out of business. They lost out on this occasion to Gretna FC, who themselves went out of business after a short six years in Scotland's top flight.

The club have used a number of different venues in their history. They played at City Park in the early years of their formation, then at Powderhall Stadium - an old-fashioned greyhound venue - both of which were demolished to make way for local housing and the current Meadowbank Stadium. The latter was built in the late 1960s to host the Commonwealth Games of 1970 and it was then used again to hold the same games in 1986.

In between these sporting events, the venue was used for other sports, mainly running and track cycling. An old works football team, Ferranti Thistle, started playing their home matches at Meadowbank and in 1974 the club changed its name to Meadowbank Thistle, playing there in the professional Scottish leagues until 1995. Due to financial problems the club relocated to the nearby town of Livingston and to a purpose-built facility originally known as Almondvale. The club then changed their name to Livingston FC. This left the Meadowbank Stadium with a football facility but no tenant, at whcih point Edinburgh City stepped in.

As a multi purpose venue it has hosted a number of other events, both sporting and recreational, most notably rugby union fixtures and music concerts including Simple Minds, Radiohead, Muse and The Foo Fighters.

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Edinburgh, Scotland EH8 7NG

0871 527 8370

http://www.premierinn.com/gb/en/hotels/scotland/lothian/edinburgh/edinburgh-east.html

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