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Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum

Los Angeles, CA

Home of the USC Trojans

4.0

4.0

Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum (map it)
3911 South Figueroa Street
Los Angeles, CA 90037


USC Trojans website

Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum website

Year Opened: 1923

Capacity: 93,607

There are no tickets available at this time.

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The Grand Old Lady

The USC Trojan football program has a longstanding history of success, boasting 11 National Titles, 6 Heisman Trophy winners and producing countless NFL players. After a 2 year ban on post season play and being limited on player scholarships, the USC football program is gradually making its way toward the top of the football ranks.

In 2013, Southern Cal made a deal to gain control of “The Grand Old Lady.” Proposals have recently been submitted for future renovations which are awaiting approval from the Coliseum Commission. The Coliseum opened in 1923 and has been the home of US football since. If approved, the much needed renovations would not only reduce the seating capacity to around 77,500, but also provide fans with a much improved game day experience, including rails along the stairs to assist fans as they descend to their seats.

In the meantime, many of USC’s storied traditions continue inside the hallowed walls of the Coliseum and any fan of collegiate football owes it to themselves to take in a game in one of the more historic venues in all of college football.

4.0

What is FANFARE?

The FANFARE scale is our metric device for rating each stadium experience. It covers the following:

  • Food & Beverage
  • Atmosphere
  • Neighborhood
  • Fans
  • Access
  • Return on Investment
  • Extras

Each area is rated from 0 to 5 stars with 5 being the best. The overall composite score is the "FANFARE Score".

Food & Beverage    4

The main concourse is filled with a good mix of permanent and temporary stands. Some of the permanent stands include "Coaches Corner" and "All-American" and have many traditional options. Some of these items include the ¼ lb Tommy dog ($7), college dog ($6), ½ lb Coliseum cheeseburger ($8), fries ($5), grilled chicken sandwich ($8), deluxe wrap ($8), gourmet salad ($8), bratwurst ($8), polish sausage ($8), pulled BBQ pork ($10), popcorn ($6), nachos ($5), soft pretzel ($5), peanuts ($5), candy ($4), or chips ($4). Beverages here include bottled water ($5), soda (24 oz for $5.50 and 32 oz for $6.50).

Most of the concourse is filled with temporary tents, almost similar to a farmer's market, offering many local favorites. Some of the items spotted this year across the various vendors include chicken teriyaki rice bowl ($9), carne asada or grilled chicken tacos (two for $9), burritos ($8), bacon wrapped hot dog ($7), burgers ($6), French fries ($9), big turkey dog ($8), funnel cake ($7), garlic fries ($7), kettle corn ($7-$10), pretzels ($5), churros ($5), cotton candy ($5 to $7), peanuts ($5), jerk chicken pizza ($5), cheese pizza ($5),12 hour pulled pork/chicken sandwiches ($10), beef tri-tip ($10), chicken ($10), rice and beans, and sushi ($10 for standard rolls, $16 for premium.

Atmosphere    4

Should you decide to start your pregame festivities on campus, you will want to make a trip to Heritage Hall. Located in the center of campus, inside you will find numerous exhibits, photos and plaques paying tribute to the many Trojan great athletes and championship teams. You will also want to check out the Hall of Champions, where you can view the 6 Heisman Trophies, as well as the statue of Tommy Trojan doing his signature pregame stabbing of the field with his sword.

The bronze statue of Tommy Trojan that is undoubtedly recognized by both admirers and detractors is located near the campus bookstore. Not only is the statue of Tommy Trojan a huge symbol of USC, it serves as good meeting place for fans prior to the game. Every year during the week leading up to their annual rivalry game with UCLA, the statue is wrapped in duct tape and guarded by the Trojan Knights to protect their beloved Tommy from any potential vandalism that may be caused by their rivals from Westwood.

As fans taking part in their on-campus pregame tailgate/festivities make their way to the Coliseum, another one of their traditions is the kicking of the flagpoles for good luck. The flagpoles are at the end of Trousdale Walk and Jefferson Blvd.

The Spirit of Troy Marching Band, easily one of the most recognizable collegiate bands, is an integral part of the game day experience, as well as their mascot Traveler. Aside from their huge presence at sporting events, the Trojan Marching Band has made numerous other TV and movie appearances, as well as performing on Fleetwood Mac's, Tusk. The Trojan Marching Band and Traveler are believed to have a huge impact not only on the team, but to the opponents as well. The sights and sounds of both the band and Traveler will be engrained in your brain from the pregame festivities through the final whistle. Another tradition is fans raising their index and middle fingers to create a "V" for victory after a win.

Two songs you will hear constantly are "Tribute to Troy" and "Fight On." "Conquest" is played following every USC touchdown. During "Conquest," Traveler VII, a live pure white Arabian/Tennessee Walker horse, trots out of the Coliseum tunnel from end zone to end zone along the sidelines behind the Trojan while wielding a sword high overhead.

Another tradition involving Traveler is the lighting of the torch prior to the 4th quarter, which the famed horse once again lets loose along the north sidelines toward the east end zone, wielding his sword toward the Coliseum torch, thus "lighting" the torch.

Neighborhood    4

Over the years, the surrounding neighborhood around campus has not been the safest. The Figueroa Corridor has brought new life along that particular stretch of Figueroa Street, lined with townhouses and various eateries, including The Lab Gastropub, located next door to the Galen Center. The area around USC continues its resurgence as more mixed-use development continues in what will be known as USC Village.

Two of the more popular choices among the USC students are Chano's and La Taquiza. Chano's offers your typical Mexican fare, burritos, nachos, tacos as well as some American favorites like burgers and hot dogs. La Taquiza is another favorite as well with their claim to fame being the mulita, two handmade tortillas with cheese, meat and guacamole. Otherwise, the corridor is also lined with your standard fast food chains, including McDonald's, Jack In The Box, Popeye's and Carl's Jr.

Across the street from the Coliseum on Figueroa is upscale student housing known as Tuscany. On the street level are such eateries as The Coffee Bean and Tea Leaf, Quizno's, Cold Stone Creamery, Gogi's Korean Grill, Budacki's Hot Dogs, Chick-fil-A and Chipotle.

On the grounds of the Coliseum is Exposition Park. If you are looking for other activities prior to the game, the Natural History Museum, the California African American Museum, as well as the Natural History Museum and the California ScienCenter are located inside the park. To be able to visit all the museums and fully take in the experience, you would probably need two days. If you're limited on time, you may want to visit the California ScienCenter, home to the Space Shuttle Endeavour.

Fans    4

USC fans are used to success. Though attendance has waned somewhat the last few seasons as the team has gone through a transition period in which they were limited on scholarships, USC football still continues to draw big crowds. The fans, spoiled by their success, can be a demanding bunch and are not shy in voicing their displeasure toward the team, as recently dismissed coaches Steve Sarkisian and Lane Kiffin will attest. In spite of their recent period of transition, USC football fans continue to actively cross the Coliseum's turnstiles in good numbers.

Access    4

The Coliseum is about three miles southwest of downtown Los Angeles and adjacent to the USC campus. The stadium is most easily reached from the 10 or the 110, both of which unfortunately have some of the most congested traffic in the area. The good news is that if you can beat the traffic, Interstate 5, LAX airport, Interstate 405, or the beach cities are not far away.

There is not a single large parking lot, but rather multiple satellite lots (with 20,000 spaces) that are typically priced based on proximity to the stadium. Most spots go for $20-$25. Keep in mind that sometimes the reward of saving $10 is much less than the risk of your car incurring some damage upon your return; so choose your lot wisely.

Should you decide to use public transit rather than drive, the MTA's Metro Expo Line has a station conveniently located across the street from campus, a short walk away as you walk through Exposition Park. The Expo Line also offers convenient connections with other MTA bus lines.

Once inside the stadium, you'll find a spacious lower concourse. If your seats are on the upper level, expect some rather intimidating inclines. Fortunately, for those who are seated on the upper level who do not wish to navigate up the stairs, 3 escalators, 2 of them on the south stands, are on site.

Return on Investment    4

Due to the large following that USC has garnered over the years, most seats go for the flat fee of $55.00. Of course for the annual premier games (Notre Dame or UCLA), expect to pay a price anywhere from $100-$125. Though tickets may be available for most games, be sure to do your research as some seats are quite a distance from the playing field. Otherwise, if you are just looking to take in the action regardless of your seating location, expect one of the more memorable experiences in college football with plenty of USC's proud traditions to take in. 


Extras    4

During your visit to the stadium, be sure to walk by the arches and check out the "Court of Honor." This memorial has many plaques to recognize the events or achievements that have occurred at the stadium. Notable names such as Daniel Reeves, Jesse Owens, Pope John Paul II, Jackie Robinson, John Wooden, and Jerry West all hold a place in the Court.

If the Olympic rings and arches weren't enough, check out the "Olympic Gateway" in front of the Coliseum. Created in 1984 by Robert Graham, this structure rises 25 feet above ground and has headless male and female bodies made of bronze.

Rivalry games create great atmosphere (and unfortunately high ticket prices) at the Coliseum. The annual game with Notre Dame is for the Jeweled Shillelagh. The two teams combined have more national championship teams, Heisman Trophy winners, and All-Americans than any other college football matchup. Since 1926, the two have met every year.

Let's not forget the Pac-12 crosstown rivalry game with UCLA. These two teams are the only two programs in the BCS that share a major city. UCLA even played in the Coliseum until 1982, when they moved to the Rose Bowl. Every year, the two play each other for the Victory Bell, painted either Red or Blue depending on who has possession.

A more interesting tradition that may not be so well-known is the #55. Typically, the number cannot be selected by any player, but rather assigned by the coach. If a player is fortunate enough to be named #55, he better represent it well as he is in some good company. Keith Rivers, Markus Steele, Junior Seau, Chris Claiborne, and Willie McGinest are some of the more notable players to don the number.

Final Thoughts

Despite being one of the oldest facilities in college football, it appears that the Coliseum still has many more chapters to be written. To ensure that the Coliseum has many more glorious chapters ahead of her, USC has recently announced preliminary plans to renovate the Grand Old Lady. The proposed renovations, if approved by the Coliseum Commission, would take place after the 2017 season. Like with any renovation project with a historic venue, the announced changes have elicited mixed reactions among the Trojan faithful. One thing that should be restored is the view of the iconic arches. Currently, the arches are obstructed and that greatly takes away from the stadium's ambiance. Yes, history and aesthetics are a very important element to the atmosphere of the game day experience to longtime followers.

Also among the proposed renovations will be the addition of more luxury suites. Long a huge source of additional revenue in any level of sports, the suites would be located along the south sidelines along with additional media press boxes. These changes should no doubt restore the look of the Coliseum's historic peristyle, giving the arches that visible and awe inspiring presence. The changes should also return the band closer to the action.

The inconveniences mentioned, echoed by the other Trojan faithful seated around me,should not deter you from taking in the USC Trojan Football experience, as you will take in the experience of one of the most storied programs and venues.

Need more tips regarding USC football, Los Angeles, or other venues throughout Southern California? Shoot me an email, Andrei.Ojeda@stadiumjourney.com. You can also drop me a line and follow me on Twitter @good_drei.

Definitely worth a visit

Undoubtedly one of the most uniquely-designed stadiums in the country, with a lot of history to boot, so definitely worth seeing, even if you can't make it during football season.

by Aaron S. Terry | Dec 03, 2015 01:02 PM

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Crowd Reviews

The Men of Troy

Total Score: 4.43

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

There are few programs in college football that can draw the ire of opposing fans nationwide. Not just fans from within the conference, but also from fans that rarely see Pac 10 Conference football. Winning will do that for a program.

The University of Southern California Trojans have a track record of unprecedented success and as a result, leave many of the competitors in awe. Annually, every team yearns to play in the Rose Bowl. USC has played in 33 and won 24, with the next most appearances by a school being "only" 20. Pardon them if they dislike losing, after all they've only had three losing seasons since 1961. The success of their program translates into the professional level as well, as the school has produced more first round NFL draft picks than anyone.

The school first fielded football team in back in 1888, and were even referred to as the "Wesleyans" and the "Methodists" for periods of time. In 1912, the nickname of "Trojans" was adopted and has been embraced ever since.

The Coliseum was opened in 1923 at a construction cost of approximately $954,873, and since then, the Trojans have called The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum their home. The stadium has been affectionately nicknamed "The Grand Old Lady" due to its prestige and age. The stadium has recently named one of the 40 best venues to experience college football by the Sporting News. With a capacity of over 93,000, there's ample opportunity for any fan to take in a game at this historic venue.

Due to its age, the stadium has undergone many renovations through over the years. In 1993, the stadium was given a $15 million renovation, but in 1994 the area experienced an earthquake that would cause damages that would require an additional $93 million in repairs. 1995 marked the trifecta of consecutive years with substantial investment into the stadium as a new press-box was constructed. Most recently in 2008, a new high-definition LED video-board & sound system were installed to give the stadium an injection of modern technology.

There are a few things that you must take part in prior to entering the stadium. First, and most importantly, you must visit the iconic statue of Tommy Trojan near the bookstore. Built in 1930, this statue takes its place in thousands of photographs on gameday.

Bask in some USC history during your stop at Heritage Hall, which is located at the center of campus. This 3 story building is home to the many honors that the university and athletes have received. You'll find photos and banners of NCAA championships, Heisman trophies, a bust of John Wayne, as well as plaques of many other honors.

As you walk down Trousdale towards the stadium, keep an eye out for the set of flag poles. In fact, you don't even need to keep an eye out, just keep listening. You'll hear the dinging sound of fans kicking the USC flag poles for good luck. Just keep in mind that the intensity with which you kick does not increase or decrease the "good luck," so let's not cause ourselves any foot injuries.

The Men of Troy-Part 2

Total Score: 4.14

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

There are few programs in college football that can draw the ire of opposing fans nationwide. Not just fans from within the conference, but also from fans that rarely see Pac 12 Conference football. Winning will do that for a program.

The University of Southern California Trojans have had a track record of unprecedented success and as a result, leave many of the competitors in awe. Annually, every team yearns to play in the Rose Bowl. USC has played in 33 and won 24, with the next most appearances by a school being "only" 20. Pardon them if they dislike losing, after all they've only had three losing seasons since 1961. The success of their program translates into the professional level as well, as the school has produced more first round NFL draft picks than anyone.

The school first fielded football team back in 1888, and were even referred to as the "Wesleyans" and the "Methodists" for periods of time. In 1912, the nickname of "Trojans" was adopted and has been embraced ever since.

The Coliseum was opened in 1923 at a construction cost of approximately $954,873, and since then, the Trojans have called The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum their home. Conversely, the Trojan basketball team plays at the modern Galen Center, a venue that has been open less than 10 years.

The stadium has been affectionately nicknamed "The Grand Old Lady" due to its prestige and age. The stadium has recently been named one of the 40 best venues to experience college football by the Sporting News. With a capacity of over 93,000, there's ample opportunity for any fan to take in a game at this historic venue.

Due to its age, the stadium has undergone many renovations throughout the years. In 1993, the stadium was given a $15 million renovation, but in 1994 the area experienced an earthquake that would cause damages that would require an additional $93 million in repairs. 1995 marked the trifecta of consecutive years with substantial investment into the stadium as a new press-box was constructed.

Most recently, for the 2011 season, a new scoreboard was installed on the west end of the stadium. It definitely cannot be missed once setting foot inside the stadium, and can even be seen clearly from outside of the east end of the stadium. The height is 40 feet and the length is 150 feet long. Its resolution of 792 pixels high definitely stands out as the modern amenity of the stadium.

There are a few things that you must take part in prior to entering the stadium. First, and most importantly, you must visit the iconic statue of Tommy Trojan near the bookstore. Built in 1930, this statue takes its place in thousands of photographs on gameday.

Bask in some USC history during your stop at Heritage Hall, which is located at the center of campus. This 3 story building is home to the many honors that the university and athletes have received. You'll find photos and banners of NCAA championships, Heisman trophies, a bust of John Wayne, as well as plaques of many other honors.

As you walk down Trousdale towards the stadium, keep an eye out for the set of flag poles. In fact, you don't even need to keep an eye out, just keep listening. You'll hear the dinging sound of fans kicking the USC flag poles for good luck. Just keep in mind that the intensity with which you kick does not increase or decrease the "good luck," so let's not cause ourselves any foot injuries.

Love the Old Grey Lady

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

I've probably been to the Coliseum more than any other stadium and she gets a lot of flack from people that haven't been there or haven't been back in a while. They have really made a lot of improvements in the last 10 years with more and better food, and facilities. It has some bad seating areas, both corners (Sec 1 & 28) next to the peristyle, but the atmosphere can't be beat. Get there early and tailgate on campus or in the parking lot and make a day of it. It really is a great place to see a game.

FIGHT ON

Total Score: 4.29

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

There are few programs in college football that can draw the ire of opposing fans nationwide. Not just fans from within the conference, but also from fans that rarely see Pac 12 Conference football. Winning will do that for a program.



The University of Southern California Trojans have had a track record of unprecedented success and as a result, leave many of the competitors in awe. Annually, every team yearns to play in the Rose Bowl. USC has played in 33 and won 24, with the next most appearances by a school being "only" 20. Pardon them if they dislike losing, after all they've only had three losing seasons since 1961. The success of their program translates into the professional level as well, as the school has produced more first round NFL draft picks than anyone.



The school first fielded a football team back in 1888, and were even referred to as the "Wesleyans" and the "Methodists" for periods of time. In 1912, the nickname of "Trojans" was adopted and has been embraced ever since.



The Coliseum was opened in 1923 at a construction cost of approximately $954,873, and since then, the Trojans have called The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum their home. Conversely, the Trojan basketball team plays at the modern Galen Center, a venue that has been open less than 10 years.



The stadium has been affectionately nicknamed "The Grand Old Lady" due to its prestige and age. With a capacity of over 93,000, there's ample opportunity for any fan to take in a game at this historic venue.

 Due to its age, the stadium has undergone many renovations throughout the years.

There are a few things that you must take part in prior to entering the stadium. First, and most importantly, you must visit the iconic statue of Tommy Trojan near the bookstore. Built in 1930, this statue takes its place in thousands of photographs on gameday.



Bask in some USC history during your stop at Heritage Hall, which is located at the center of campus. This 3 story building is home to the many honors that the university and athletes have received. You'll find photos and banners of NCAA championships, Heisman trophies, a bust of John Wayne, as well as plaques of many other honors.



As you walk down Trousdale towards the stadium, keep an eye out for the set of flag poles. In fact, you don't even need to keep an eye out, just keep listening. You'll hear the dinging sound of fans kicking the USC flag poles for good luck. Just keep in mind that the intensity with which you kick does not increase or decrease the "good luck," so let's not cause ourselves any foot injuries.

FIGHT ON

Total Score: 4.29

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

There are few programs in college football that can draw the ire of opposing fans nationwide. Not just fans from within the conference, but also from fans that rarely see Pac 12 Conference football. Winning will do that for a program.



The University of Southern California Trojans have had a track record of unprecedented success and as a result, leave many of the competitors in awe. Annually, every team yearns to play in the Rose Bowl. USC has played in 33 and won 24, with the next most appearances by a school being "only" 20. Pardon them if they dislike losing, after all they've only had three losing seasons since 1961. The success of their program translates into the professional level as well, as the school has produced more first round NFL draft picks than anyone.



The school first fielded a football team back in 1888, and were even referred to as the "Wesleyans" and the "Methodists" for periods of time. In 1912, the nickname of "Trojans" was adopted and has been embraced ever since.



The Coliseum was opened in 1923 at a construction cost of approximately $954,873, and since then, the Trojans have called The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum their home. Conversely, the Trojan basketball team plays at the modern Galen Center, a venue that has been open less than 10 years.



The stadium has been affectionately nicknamed "The Grand Old Lady" due to its prestige and age. With a capacity of over 93,000, there's ample opportunity for any fan to take in a game at this historic venue.

 Due to its age, the stadium has undergone many renovations throughout the years.

There are a few things that you must take part in prior to entering the stadium. First, and most importantly, you must visit the iconic statue of Tommy Trojan near the bookstore. Built in 1930, this statue takes its place in thousands of photographs on gameday.



Bask in some USC history during your stop at Heritage Hall, which is located at the center of campus. This 3 story building is home to the many honors that the university and athletes have received. You'll find photos and banners of NCAA championships, Heisman trophies, a bust of John Wayne, as well as plaques of many other honors.



As you walk down Trousdale towards the stadium, keep an eye out for the set of flag poles. In fact, you don't even need to keep an eye out, just keep listening. You'll hear the dinging sound of fans kicking the USC flag poles for good luck. Just keep in mind that the intensity with which you kick does not increase or decrease the "good luck," so let's not cause ourselves any foot injuries.

It's the LA Coliseum!

Total Score: 3.86

  • Food & Beverage: 3
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

While I like football and football stadiums, they aren't my passion. Despite that, the LA Coliseum was one of my top 5 "must visit" stadiums for years. So, when my Syracuse Orange scheduled a game out there, I didn't even have to think twice before booking a cross-country flight from my home in Washington, DC.

I've only attended one game here, so I can't claim to be an expert. But, as a stadium collector who has attended games at well over 100 venues, I can tell you that the LA Coliseum was everything you'd expect and more. The things that struck me:

--The crowd in the city. LA's traffic is notorious, and I had heard about how it becomes simply apocalyptic on USC game days. I found that slightly exaggerated. In any case, once our car was parked, it was hard to believe we were in LA--it felt like we were in the midwest. The fans and the tailgate scene were wonderful and full of hospitality in a way that you don't expect in a major city.

--The Entrance. When you think of iconic sports venues, certain places immediately come to mind. The Green Monster. The ivy at Wrigley. The Twin Spires of Churchill Downs. The roof at MSG. Maybe it's just my East Coast bias, but I feel like the LA Coliseum gets overlooked here. It doesn't deserve to be. When you look up and see the columns and the Olympic cauldron, you know you're somewhere special. The history is palpable. That's the real draw for me; I've always loved timeless places, and this is one of the best. And even if it weren't, USC is a solid program with a great game presentation. And the seats all seemed to be comfortable and have good views.

One of my favorites.

Fun, laid back

Total Score: 4.14

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

Crazy to be driving through the hood and then suddenly be in this gated, beautiful campus. Traditions is one of the best college bars I have ever been to.

FIGHT ON

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

The Trojan program has traditionally been one of the more notable ones in college football. During the past five years however, the program and its prized facility seem to be at a crossroads. Sanctions against the school affected the product on the field & an aging stadium was affecting the fan experience during gameday.

The sanctions will sort themselves out over time; with its prestige and location, recruits will once more yearn to play at USC.  The future of the stadium is a rather unpredictable one however.  During 2013, the school made a deal to gain control of the formerly state-run facility.  As part of the deal, the school has committed to up to $100 million in renovations to restore the once-great venue.  Naturally, local business, residents, and fans are anxious to see what may come of the changes.

Only the program itself remains older than the venue.  The first football team at the school came to be back in 1888, and was for a period referred to as the "Wesleyans" and the "Methodists." In 1912, the nickname of "Trojans" was adopted and has been embraced ever since.



The Coliseum was opened in 1923 at a construction cost of approximately $954,873, and since then, the Trojans have called The Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum their home. Conversely, the Trojan basketball team plays at the modern Galen Center, a venue that has been open less than 10 years.



The stadium has been affectionately nicknamed "The Grand Old Lady" due to its prestige and age. With a capacity of over 93,000, there's ample opportunity for any fan to take in a game at this historic venue.



Ghetto Experience

Total Score: 1.29

  • Food & Beverage: 0
  • Atmosphere 1
  • Neighborhood: 1
  • Fans: 1
  • Access: 2
  • RoI: 1
  • Extras: 3

I've seen about 20 college football games at the Coliseum since 1980. We quit going due to the awful environment, lack of secure parking, vulgar and belligerent USC fans, agressive panhandlers, etc.... My lasting memory is from a USC-UCLA game in the late '90s. We had just paid $15 to gang members for the privilege to park in a vacant lot. The vehicles were packed in. Some well-heeled USC fans were tailgating in the dirt behind their white Cadillac, drinking chardonnay and fine scotch from crystal stemware. Their cute little travelling cocktail briefcase, white slacks, red sweaters, and obvious fear juxtaposed comically with the surroundings. No thanks, I will stay home.

Landmark Stadium

Total Score: 4.43

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

Definitely one of the top 10, possibly top 5, stadiums to visit in the country. The stadium itself is fabulous, with the imposing arches at the entrance, plus statues and other sights. A little surprising that is doesn't sell out given how good USC has been over the years, but I guess that means the stadium is just a little too big (or that other CA attractions are a slightly better draw). Parking/getting to the stadium isn't bad, as the city was defined for much worse. Ticket prices are fair, and there is a lot to do in the neighborhood. Biggest competition is the Rose Bowl, which is similarly designed in some ways. Weird fact - the Coliseum was declared a national historic landmark on the day BEFORE the 1984 Olympics, which seems perhaps a bit premature.

USC Football

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 3

I went to a USC vs. UCLA game and it was a great environment. Definitely cool college football experience. A little old and neighborhood is pretty bad.

Share your thoughts about Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum

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Local Entertainment

Exposition Park  (map it!)

700 State Dr

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(213) 744-7458

http://www.expositionpark.org/

Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County  (map it!)

900 Exposition Blvd

Los Angeles, CA 90007

(213) 763-3466

http://www.nhm.org/site/

California Science Center  (map it!)

700 Exposition Park

Los Angeles, CA 90007

(323) 724-3623

http://www.californiasciencecenter.org/MainPage.php

Lodging

Radisson Hotel Los Angeles Midtown at USC  (map it!)

3540 S Figueroa St

Los Angeles, CA 90007

(213) 748-4141

http://www.radisson.com/los-angeles-hotel-ca-90007/cafiguer

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