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AT&T Park

San Francisco, CA

Home of the San Francisco Giants

4.4

4.2

AT&T Park (map it)
24 Willie Mays Plaza
San Francisco, CA 94107


San Francisco Giants website

AT&T Park website

Year Opened: 2000

Capacity: 41,503

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The Cove

There is a dynasty living in Major League Baseball, and it calls AT&T Park in San Francisco home. The Giants have won three of the last five Word Series, a pace that has not been set since the turn of the century. AT&T Park has been the panoramic setting for the birth of this dynasty and does everything it can to live up to the lofty expectations set by its occupant.

For four decades from 1960 to 2000, Candlestick Park had been home to the San Francisco Giants. Despite a long and storied history, Candlestick fell into disrepair in the 90’s and the need for a new home for the Giants became evident. While the San Francisco 49ers would continue to play football there well into the 2000’s, the Giants began plans to open a shiny new ballpark by the turn of the century.

Ground broke on the new stadium in 1997 in the growing neighborhood of South Beach on the China Basin waterfront. Modeled after the popular new ballpark trend started by Camden Yards in Baltimore, the park would quickly become one of the nicest in baseball. Originally named Pacific Bell Park, the doors opened on April 11, 2000. In 2003, the name changed to SBC Park and subsequently became AT&T Park in 2006. AT&T Park is now widely considered one of the top ballparks in the MLB and has some strong arguments for the top spot.

4.4

What is FANFARE?

The FANFARE scale is our metric device for rating each stadium experience. It covers the following:

  • Food & Beverage
  • Atmosphere
  • Neighborhood
  • Fans
  • Access
  • Return on Investment
  • Extras

Each area is rated from 0 to 5 stars with 5 being the best. The overall composite score is the "FANFARE Score".

Food & Beverage    5

AT&T Park is well known for the plethora of food options that can be purchased around its concourses. Whatever you're in the mood for, you can probably find it. There's not a whole lot of repetition around the park and variety reigns supreme.

If you're looking for standard ballpark food, Doggie Diner and Say Hey serve up all kinds of brats, hot dogs, pretzels, nachos and chicken. Some of the cooler options you'll see include Orlando's for their signature Cha Cha Bowl, Crazy Crab Wharf for a delicious crab sandwich, Tres for gourmet Mexican food and Portwalk Pizza for handmade pizzas.

One of the more famous items around the park is Gilroy Garlic Fry, where you can get exactly what the name implies. Located at 7 spots around the park, these garlic fries are hard to turn down.

Local beer options are all over the park. Lagunitas, Speakeasy, 21st Amendment, Bear Republic and Anchor Brewing are represented throughout the park and are all Northern California based. Prices range from $8 to $11 for beer, so be prepared to spend a bit if you want to drink. You can also get a variety of mixed drinks at Cable Car Bars or stop by the California Wine Carts for some local wine.

Everything here is pricey, and expect to pay at least $6 for food items with upper levels around $12. However, it's an acceptable cost for such a wide variety of tasty menu options.

Atmosphere    5

Easily in the upper echelon of major league ballparks, AT&T Park offers just about all of the amenities you'll need and the crowds show up in numbers consistently. Winning 3 World Series in 5 years definitely helps, but there's a definitely excitement and cockiness around the ballpark in the usually full stands.

The outside of the park is one of best and most iconic you'll find anywhere. Aptly located at 24 Willie Mays Plaza, you'll be greeted by the statue of the famous Mays himself in front of the main gate. The brick façade of the stadium's exterior blends modern ballpark design with the history of the area. Palm trees line the pathways as you make your way around to the back of the park and the San Francisco bay. A long dock where boats can be pulled up extends from behind the arena gate. Beyond the low right field wall you'll find the most recognizable external feature of AT&T Park in McCovey Cove. Occasional kayakers and boats wait out here for home run balls, but not in the memorable numbers of the Barry Bonds days.

Inside the park you have a lot of similarly spectacular features. The seating is close around the park, giving it an intimate feel. The upper deck view is one of the better from the cheap seats in baseball. Aside from the closeness of the field to the park, the view of the bay from the seats can only be bad if it distracts from the action on the field. The brick right field wall is 24 feet high in honor of the Giants' famous #24, Willie Mays. Behind the left field bleachers is the Coca-Cola Fan Lot featuring an 80 foot long Coca Cola bottle with a multi-level slide. There is also a giant fiberglass classic 4-fingered baseball glove representing the Giants long past.

Behind center field there is a bar and picnic area with a large section of food options and restaurants. Unfortunately, the game is not viewable from most of this section, although it's loaded with TVs. This brings in the only potential misses for the park atmosphere. The park consists of a lot of crammed concourses with limited field views in the lower levels. This culminates in the outfield section near the Anchor Brewing stand, which almost feels like it's outside the entire park. None of the amenities from inside the park face out and the chain link fence and black asphalt give this and a few others areas of the park a much less desirable feel.

Neighborhood    5

You couldn't ask for much more in an area around a ballpark than what is offered up by the San Francisco area. The greater San Francisco area has as much character as just about any city in the country with views to match. For tourists, be sure to head to the Golden Gate Bridge, Pier 39, Alactraz Island and Golden Gate Park for some truly San Francisco experiences.

In the more immediate vicinity of the ballpark, restaurants and bars abound. If you can't find somewhere to eat or drink within walking distance, you'll never find one anywhere. From upscale dining to local bars, it's all there. Popular locations around the park include Momo's, Pedro's Cantina, Pete's Tavern and 21st Amendment Brewery. Expect crowds, so it's best to get there early and give yourself some time to grab a seat and enjoy some local atmosphere. Attached to AT&T Park is the Public House, a bar and restaurant. There's direct access to the ballpark from the restaurant and they'll even give you a plastic cup to take your beer into the game.

Hotels abound in the area as well, but San Francisco can be pricey. For cheaper options you can stay to the south close to the airport or even the Santa Clara/San Jose area. It's a straight shot up the 101 to get to the park from there.

Fans    4

The Giants fans definitely pack AT&T Park for every game. Again, the winning tradition absolutely helps with attendance, but there is real passion amongst the fan base. The fans know the players nicknames, heckle the opposing the players with pre-arranged chants and cheer loudly for their team.

There does seem to be a bit of a divide between the fan base in terms of the types of fans. You can clearly identify the traditional Giants fans and those that are more of the "fair-weather" variety. You'll see those of the latter leaving early and complaining should the 3-time World Series Champions struggle early. But overall, the fan base is present, passionate and loud.

Access    3

The park is pretty easy to get to depending on San Francisco traffic. It's just south of the Bay Bridge from the east and just off of 101 from the south. But let's be clear, driving to a Giants game isn't easy. Parking rates start at $30, but you're likely to see options exceeding $50-$60 if you don't arrive early. So if you're going to drive, arrive early or park nearby and take a cab in.

So what are your options? Well San Francisco offers a few. Just a couple blocks from the park you can find the Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) stop at Embarcadero Station. It's likely to be crowded both before and after due its close proximity to the park, but it's a viable option if you're staying in the city. The area is walkable and if you can get away from the park a bit it's pretty easy to grab a cab as well.

MUNI city buses stop outside the park as well and if you're staying in San Jose you can take the Caltrain which stops just 1 block from the park. Again, use the bars and restaurants around the park to your advantage to arrive early and stay late to avoid the rush.

Once at the park, work your way around the Marina gate on the bay. This gate will be far less crowded and afford you views of McCovey Cove and the bay. When you get inside, be prepared for some crowded concourses that weave their way around the stadium. Everything inside feels a bit congested, at least until you get to the upper deck (if that's your destination).

Return on Investment    4

While the park is clearly on anyone's short list of top ballparks in the country, the overall cost of the experience is a slight downside. By all means, a Giants game at AT&T should be experienced at least once by every baseball fan. But be sure to budget accordingly. Everything will cost a little more, but be a little better at AT&T Park. You can cut some costs out by planning your arrival and avoiding the astronomical parking charges.

Extras    5

One of the standards of the new generation of ballparks that emphasize design and uniqueness, AT&T Park offers an abundance of extras. McCovey Cove and the right field wall are famous hallmarks of San Francisco and worth the visit even if there's not a game going on. Statues of McCovey, Cepeda and Mays adorn the beautiful area surrounding the park and give you a sense of history when you first walk up. The Coca Cola Fan Lot provides enjoyment for kids and adults alike with its slide and great views of the game. The park was named the best for vegetarian eating, and its massive selection of food options make it ideal for sampling delicious items. And the overall sense of pride that Giants fans feel in the park can be felt immediately during any dialogue.

Final Thoughts

Overall, the park has a strong reputation and should easily be on any fans top 5 or 6 ballparks list. For the baseball traveler, this belongs on the bucket list alongside Fenway, Wrigley, Camden and PNC rating as essential experiences. While the park has enough character to invoke a variance of opinions, it's an opinion you should form yourself on a beautiful weekend afternoon in San Francisco.

Nice review Andrew. My one addition to new visitors to AT&T would be to not miss out on the Cha Cha

Nice review Andrew. My one addition to new visitors to AT&T would be to not miss out on the Cha Cha Bowl from Orlando's Carribean BBQ located in center field. A unique ballpark item - black beans, rice, your choice of meat, and excellent salsa.

by jonah | Apr 21, 2010 08:28 AM

I think that AT&T is a great place, with a lot of unique things (like McCovey Cove), in a great neig

I think that AT&T is a great place, with a lot of unique things (like McCovey Cove), in a great neighborhood, and some of the best food in baseball. But does anyone else feel like that giant Coke bottle out in left center field is an annoying eyesore?

by paul | Jun 16, 2010 04:43 AM

I haven\'t been to many MLB stadiums (Angel Stadium, Dodger Stadium and AT&T Park) but the latter is

I haven't been to many MLB stadiums (Angel Stadium, Dodger Stadium and AT&T Park) but the latter is the best I have visited by far. The banners outside on the street level give a bit of a Yawkey Way feel (I can only tell from pictures that I have seen). The inside of the stadium is great. Not that big but some nice quirks in the outfield wall. At least this former NY team does honour it's NY roots by naming some of the NY players as well (unlike the other Californian team that came from the NY area). I like the giant Coke bottle in left field. It gives a nice touch to the ballpark.

by yankeebiscuitfan | Sep 16, 2010 09:59 AM

AT&T Park

I haven't been to many MLB stadiums so far, but AT&T Park was one of them. It was the best looking MLB ballpark I have been to so far. The Giants fans are very lucky to have a home like this.

by yankeebiscuitfan | Jun 19, 2011 06:56 AM

Yikes!

I was going by the park the other day and saw a 4 different parking garages advertising their lots for $60! Like I said in the review, parking provided by AT&T Park is $30 but there are a limited number of spots. Parking in the neighboring lots are usually cheaper ($15-25). There may have been another event going on in the area besides the game as the price was double what I last saw. Who knows? Just another reason to take public transportation the yard.

by ryannorris | Jun 25, 2011 10:28 AM

Beautiful Park but what a MESS!!!

I recently attended a 3 game series at AT&T Park this was the 11 different MLB Park that we have visited. The facility itself was like stepping into a postcard. The View from your seats was everything that has been advertised but the good experience seemed to end there!!

Moving around inside the park was a NIGHMARE!! The walkways all around the field are way too small to handle any crowd at all. They were appox. 10 feet more narrow than most parks. This was by far the worst Stadium for fan movement that we have been too, for example it too us 45 min to get out of the park at the end of the game. People were shoulder to shoulder and not moving because the walkways were jammed. At the beginning of the game they give emergency evacuation procedures. They might as well throw them out the window unless they give an hour warning before the Earthquake or other disaster hits There should also be double the amount of toilets that there are the lines at the bathrooms were CRAZY!!

What is the deal with NO VENDERS? Yes, there was the occasional Cherro (however you spell it). But it was very rare to see any other vendors at all, even Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, and NEW YORK Sell beer with vendors. No Dogs Either. This just forced you to go back and fight the crowds shoulder to shoulder through the narrow halls.

The worst part were the ushers!! The game was over and they were in your face telling you that you had to leave. They said they had to let the seagulls in to clean or something. Where were you supposed to go? Back into the Hurd of people waiting to get to the crowded stairways and ramps to inch your way to freedom out of that Hell Hole!!

Needless to say ONE Visit was more that Enough!! I just hope that another 1989 World Series game never happens again because if it does I really fear for those people. I am Just glad to say that I won't be there.

If you are a Fan Make one visit and mark it off your list. Spend the rest of your time in San Fran at the Warf or Alcatraz they were much nicer!!

by MLBFAN | Jul 16, 2011 11:55 PM

Great time

I have been to only 6 MLB stadiums, but this one was by far the most picturesqe. We spent a lot of time there during a Sunday day game. Walk around the outside to find all sorts of history. Make a circle through the inside of the park to look at all the different views. Behind scoreboard is like a central market of food and drink choices. The concourse is narrow but not unmanagable, but don't think that you can enter the gates and get to your sets in a minute or two if first pitch is close. I thought it was kind of funny to see the seagulls go wild after the stadium bleachers clear out (a feast for them I guess). Overall it was my favorite to visit, so easy to get to with public trans, and good 1st level seats weren't more than $50 or so. Would definately go back.

by mitch1674 | Mar 01, 2013 04:24 PM

Vendors

PS I actually loved it that there were no beer vendors to get in my way and obstruct the view or screaming about "beer here!". I mostly go to Miller Park and US Cellular where the vendors are constantly in my face or standing in my view of the plate. If you want a beer every inning, go to a bar.

by mitch1674 | Mar 01, 2013 04:27 PM

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Crowd Reviews

San Francisco Giants at AT&T Park

Total Score: 4.43

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 5

The Giants moved from blistering Candlestick Park five miles north to their new penthouse at 3rd and King Streets in downtown San Francisco for the start of the 2000 season. AT&T Park immediately became an icon in the baseball park landscape and paved the way for the renaissance of new parks in the early 2000's.

The brick exterior makes for an old-timey, aesthetically pleasing monument to San Francisco baseball fifty years in the making. One of the few items to make the trip up to King Street is the old foghorn played loudly and proudly after every Giants homerun, a perfect Ode to San Francisco.

At just under 42,000 seats, AT&T Park has a much more intimate feel than the football stadium they played in prior to their move. Seats along the first and third baselines are closer than they had been before and the short porch in right field allows fans a close look from any angle. Just beyond the aforementioned right field wall is McCovey Cove, an inlet of the San Francisco Bay that has seen dozens of homerun balls splash down after a serious poke from a certain burly left-handed hitter.

With the move to the new park came a recommitment to Giants history, both New York and San Francisco. Plaques along the exterior of the park facing King Street represent the Giants Wall of Fame. Requirements to be immortalized are eight years with the club or five and at least one all-star appearance.

World Series Champion flags fly high above the clock in center field representing the New York championships from decades ago. Alongside now is a bright orange banner from last year representing the sole San Francisco championship.

At the three main corners of the ballpark are statues representing the San Francisco Hall-of-Famers. Orlando Cepeda claims 2nd and King, Juan Marichal's high leg-kick can be seen along 3rd Street at the Lefty O'Doul Gate and Willie Mays has his own plaza (the ballpark's address is 24 Willie Mays Plaza) front and center at the main entrance. Right across the cove you can find Willie McCovey looking over his namesake.

A Giant Gem- AT&T Park

Total Score: 4.43

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

The only bad day (or night) at AT&T Park is one where the home team gets annihilated. If the San Francisco Giants are in the game, forget about where you're sitting or who's playing or what season it is. To prove it, I chose a meaningless game in late September against the vanilla Arizona Diamondbacks for my visit.

Arguably Pac Bellâ?¦sorryâ?¦AT&T Park's best feature is that the entire thing is accessible with the price of any ticket unless you're talking about the real rarefied seating areas. Of course, it had to be that way given the volume of sensory input.

A simple walk around the concourse is anything but simple.

There is a dizzying array of foodâ??everything from garlic fries to crab sandwiches to standard ballpark franks and even a selection of California. There are a plethora of options to keep youngsters busy behind the leftfield bleachersâ??a mini-diamond for actual use, the huge Coke bottle slide, and an arcade though this I've never seen. Furthermore, the water cannons following splash hits are always good for an ooh or ah.

For those adults who've been dragged to the stadium, the whole thing is one huge wireless hotspot so you can hop online.

However, the best is saved for those in the audience who are there for the beautiful game.

There aren't any bad seatsâ??the lower boxes are excellent, the skyboxes are as luxurious as you'd imagine (fine catered food, good wine, better beer, HD televisions inside and out for a closer look or should the mild NorCal climate take a turn, etc.), and the upper deck hangs over the action for a better-than-it-should-be perspective. Plus, the higher up you go, the more the lovely San Francisco Bay stretches out as the backdrop.

A Great Park

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

I attended a game at AT&T back in 2002, and was lucky to be able to catch Greg Maddux as the opposing pitcher. I was there for my first anniversary with my wife (who was still bringing books to baseball games at the time). What I remember most is the amazing food that the ballpark has to offer, and the accompanying smells.

We sat in the upper deck in the first row abou teven with third base, and it felt further away than some upper deck experiences at other ballparks. While, I can't say that I'm a huge fan of the giant coke bottle in left center field, I do like McCovey Cove, and the great tribute statue to Willie Mays outside. San Francisco (besides the hills) can be a very walkable city, and the area around the ballpark was no exception. I am really looking forward to a return trip to AT&T Park sometime soon.

What a Mess

Total Score: 2.00

  • Food & Beverage: 1
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 0
  • RoI: 1
  • Extras: 1

I recently attended a 3 game series at AT&T Park this was the 11 different MLB Park that we have visited. The facility itself was like stepping into a postcard. The View from your seats was everything that has been advertised but the good experience seemed to end there!!

Moving around inside the park was a NIGHMARE!! The walkways all around the field are way too small to handle any crowd at all. They were appox. 10 feet more narrow than most parks. This was by far the worst Stadium for fan movement that we have been too, for example it too us 45 min to get out of the park at the end of the game. People were shoulder to shoulder and not moving because the walkways were jammed. At the beginning of the game they give emergency evacuation procedures. They might as well throw them out the window unless they give an hour warning before the Earthquake or other disaster hits There should also be double the amount of toilets that there are the lines at the bathrooms were CRAZY!!

What is the deal with NO VENDERS? Yes, there was the occasional Cherro (however you spell it). But it was very rare to see any other vendors at all, even Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, and NEW YORK Sell beer with vendors. No Dogs Either. This just forced you to go back and fight the crowds shoulder to shoulder through the narrow halls.

The worst part were the ushers!! The game was over and they were in your face telling you that you had to leave. They said they had to let the seagulls in to clean or something. Where were you supposed to go? Back into the Hurd of people waiting to get to the crowded stairways and ramps to inch your way to freedom out of that Hell Hole!!

Needless to say ONE Visit was more that Enough!! I just hope that another 1989 World Series game never happens again because if it does I really fear for those people. I am Just glad to say that I won't be there.

If you are a Fan Make one visit and mark it off your list. Spend the rest of your time in San Fran at the Warf or Alcatraz they were much nicer

Impressive...

Total Score: 4.29

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 4

Really a visually impressive ballpark in a great location. I found it really easy to get to the ballpark after a spending the day in the city being a tourist. Loved the atmosphere surrounding the stadium before the game – enjoyed chatting with the locals over a few drinks. Good range of food although I’m not sold on the garlic fries – the entire park smells of garlic! The fans were particularly boisterous (the Giants were hosting the Dodgers) inside the park, although I found their hostility a little unnerving at first. Also worth noting that it was very tough to get tickets and they were expensive.

24 Willie Mays Plaza

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

With how entrenched the Giants are in San Francisco and AT&T Park, it's hard to believe there was ever a time where the Giants' future was ever in doubt. At Candlestick Park, crowds were sparse and conditions were tough. It was a far cry to the beauty, natural and constructed, and corresponding unparalleled success the team has enjoyed at AT&T Park.

In 1976, the team was almost lost to Toronto. Instead Bob Lurie led an investment group to keep the team in San Francisco where they struggled most of the 1970's and 80's. Toronto was awarded an expansion franchise in 1977 and the Blue Jays were born.

Uncertainty reared its head again in 1992, just 3 years after their 1989 World Series appearance. Bob Lurie put the team up for sale and a group of investors from St. Petersburg reached an agreement to purchase the team. That is when Oakland A's owner Walter Haas granted the exclusive territorial rights to the South Bay (including San Jose) to Giants so they could explore the possibility of placing a ballpark there. Subsequently a local group of investors purchased the team.

Fast forward to 1997 and the ground was broken in what would become one of the great ballparks in MLB.

When the Giants moved to 3rd and King they did absolutely everything correct aesthetically and historically. They honor great Giants of the past at every turn around the ballpark, the park opens its arms to the bay, and the marketing team does everything in its power to make fans feel like it is the only place to be in the city.

$3 apple for free!

Total Score: 3.43

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 2
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 2

This is a "new" ballpark, it has a few interesting site lines, I liked looking at the wall in right field and all of the outfield had personality, but looking back from the outfield in didn't have much charm. I attended Opening Day 2014 and the crowd was a lot of fun, I don't like a lot of the ballpark food and I saw a guest service person eating an apple when he walked by, I commented that I would pay $3 for an apple, I didn't think he heard me, about 10 mins later he came back and gave me an apple! Well done sir, great hospitality!

Best stadium in San Francisco

Total Score: 4.43

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

I know, it's the only one. What can you expect from a Dodger fan. I live in Monterey so this is the stadium I have to go to to see an MLB game. Only other choice is Oakland and.... yuck! Stadium is extremely nice. Food is as advertised. Tasty but expensive. Best part for a Blue fan though is the fan reception. At Candlestick back in the 80's I was at times more than a bit nervous. At AT&T, I feel accepted if not welcomed. Good fans and very nice environment for BB fans of all teams. Overall, for me just the baseball experience alone rates a 4.9 (not a 5 because... it is the Giants were talking about). Oh yeah, the view is amazing.

The Bay's Beauty

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

The San Francisco Giants have had more success at AT&T Park since 2000 than they did in all their years at Candlestick Park (1960-1999). Since moving downtown, the Giants have been to the World Series three times, winning in 2010 and 2012. They've also seen controversial slugger Barry Bonds set the single-season and all-time home run records during that time.

With how entrenched the Giants are in San Francisco and AT&T Park, it's hard to believe there was ever a time where the Giants' future was ever in doubt. At Candlestick Park, crowds were sparse and conditions were tough. It was a far cry to the beauty, natural and constructed, and corresponding unparalleled success the team has enjoyed at AT&T Park.

After moving west from New York and prior to the construction of Candlestick Park, the Giants played at Seals Stadium (1958 and 1959) at the corner of 16th and Bryant Streets across from Franklin Square Park in San Francisco's Mission District. Seals Stadium was the longtime home to the San Francisco Seals and the short-time home of the Mission Reds, both of the Pacific Coast League.

In 1976, the team was almost lost to Toronto. Instead Bob Lurie led an investment group to keep the team in San Francisco where they struggled most of the 1970's and 80's. Toronto was awarded an expansion franchise in 1977 and the Blue Jays were born.

Uncertainty reared its head again in 1992, just 3 years after their 1989 World Series appearance. Bob Lurie put the team up for sale and a group of investors from St. Petersburg reached an agreement to purchase the team. That is when Oakland A's owner Walter Haas granted the exclusive territorial rights to the South Bay (including San Jose) to the Giants so they could explore the possibility of placing a ballpark there. Subsequently a local group of investors purchased the team.

Fast forward to 1997 and the ground was broken in what would become one of the great ballparks in MLB.

So good

Total Score: 3.57

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 3
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 5

I was really looking forward to finally getting inside this park after walking the outside a few years ago. Definitely wasn't a let down. Great everything here, although the fans take themselves a little too seriously. It just seems crazy to me that a small body of water separates the two baseball stadiums, and they can be so different with such a different atmosphere. The year-by-year history of the Giants all along McCovey Cove is a great touch. Parking's a little on the expensive side, but it's San Francisco, so I guess that's expected.

Great Family Park

Total Score: 5.00

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 5
  • Extras: 5

Amazing stadium. Great views of the bay. Fun park for kids with two huge coke slides in the back that are a lot of fun. Come early for batting practice to catch home runs, the kids love it. Overall one of the nicest stadiums in the MLB tied with Pittsburgh and Baltimore.

Beyond Unique

Total Score: 4.29

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 2
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

AT&T Park, home of the Giants, has been widely regarded as one of the best, if not the best ballpark in all of baseball. And if you don't think it is the best, you do have to think it is still a GREAT park. It is definitely one of a kind that cannot be replaced in any sort.

FOOD & BEVERAGE: The words "something for everybody" is underrated here. Basic fare, to SF stables (Crab sandwiches, garlic fries, etc.), to mexican fare, to ice cream to hot fudge sundaes, to pitas, etc. I could go on and on. And the actual quality of it is top notch. It is probably a reason why the foods are a tad more expensive than anywhere else.

ATMOSPHERE: The place is always kicking it seems, whether they are winning or losing. You just know you are in a great baseball place the minute you walk in through the neon lit gates and see all the great history of the Giants on the walls and so forth.

NEIGHBORHOOD: Yeah, you do have some places to hit after the game, but it is still a nice walk. The area is all right but numerous panhandlers are around the area and in some cases right at the gates. I don't want to sound rude, but it was way excessive and while there are signs saying no panhandling, it doesn't look to be enforced.

FANS: They are a supportive and a festive bunch and are into the game.

ACCESS: In terms of getting there, the roads are "easy," but San Francisco traffic is arguably the worst around and even hours well before game time it is a mess around the area. Parking doesn't come cheap here either. Probably the lone flaw of this ballpark.

ROI: Everything is expensive, though souvenirs are the standard prices. Foods, probably because they are so good is pretty expensive. But you get your bang for the buck. Plus, if you have kids the slides inside the Coke bottle are free of charge.

EXTRAS: The view of the park, wow. The layout, the uniqueness to the place, and the history of the Giants painted all over the place is definitely a must for any baseball fan, even if you are not a Giants fan.

Bias aside, among the best

Total Score: 4.71

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 5
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

When I tell people that I have attended games in all 30 MLB parks, the natural question is which one is the best. The answer depends on the questioner, baseball traditionalistor novice, just there for a game or making a weekend of it, Bud Light drinker or connoisseur of microbrews. Short answer: AT&T Park. Not just something for everyone, something excellent in all areas. Just take public transit or enjoy this walkable area of San Francisco.

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