• Search by team or stadium name:

Buy the latest issue of Stadium Journey Magazine - Subscribe Today!

Stadium Journey Sports Magazine Subscriptions

Angel Stadium of Anaheim

Anaheim, CA

Home of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim

4.1

3.9

Angel Stadium of Anaheim (map it)
2000 Gene Autry Way
Anaheim, CA 92806


Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim website

Angel Stadium of Anaheim website

Year Opened: 1966

Capacity: 45,050

Select from 18 remaining home games and SAVE 10% - 60%!

See all available Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim tickets

Date Time Opponent Savings
8/25 7:05 PM Miami Marlins Save 25%
8/26 7:05 PM Miami Marlins Save 25%
8/27 7:05 PM Miami Marlins Save 25%
8/28 7:05 PM Oakland Athletics Save 25%
8/29 7:05 PM Oakland Athletics Save 10%
8/30 6:05 PM Oakland Athletics Save 10%
8/31 12:35 PM Oakland Athletics Save 10%
9/12 7:05 PM Houston Astros Save 25%
9/13 6:05 PM Houston Astros Save 10%

See tickets for all 18 games

Reviews

Local Information

Share
this

A Day at The Big A

Since 1966, the Angels have called Angel Stadium home, but if you didn’t know any better, you would swear that The Big A is a lot newer than that.

Angel Stadium has gone through many facelifts in its time. Back in the St. Louis Rams days, the stadium had a capacity of about 65,000 and looked like this. Thankfully in 1997, that all changed and the stadium that we see today was renovated, and turned back into a baseball stadium rather than a multi-purpose travesty.

The Angels haven’t always played at the corner of the 57 and Orangewood. When the team was first founded in 1961 by Gene Autry, the Halos played at Wrigley Field. No, not that Wrigley Field, but the Wrigley Field located in South Los Angeles. But after one year, it was clear that Major League Baseball would not work in the stadium, so the Angels spent the next four seasons sharing Chavez Ravine with the Dodgers.

Since then, three All-Star Games have been played at Angel Stadium, the 2002 World Series was clinched there, and many other special moments in the history of baseball have also occurred here. All of this history is celebrated in the park in one way or another, but all of the modern amenities baseball fans expect are there as well. It really is a great mix of the past, present, and future of MLB.

4.1

What is FANFARE?

The FANFARE scale is our metric device for rating each stadium experience. It covers the following:

  • Food & Beverage
  • Atmosphere
  • Neighborhood
  • Fans
  • Access
  • Return on Investment
  • Extras

Each area is rated from 0 to 5 stars with 5 being the best. The overall composite score is the "FANFARE Score".

Food & Beverage    4

Angel Stadium provides a plethora of food choices, but they'll cost you a pretty penny. The Angels official website provides a concessions map, as well as menus for all of the various concession locations found throughout the park. There are also concession stand listings on the walls behind home plate and near each foul pole.

Some major chains found inside the stadium are Jack-in-the-Box, Panda Express, Jersey Mike's, and Wetzel's Pretzels. They're all more expensive than what you would pay at non-stadium locations.

The most popular option seems to be Smoke Ring BBQ, which is located in the food court just inside Gate 1. Here you can get a smoked half-chicken, pork ribs, brisket, jumbo hot dogs, and kielbasa. There's a huge line there from before the game starts all the way through the late innings. That's the one down side. And it is quite expensive, with all these items costing anywhere from $10-$15.

Another popular area is the right field concourse. Chronic Tacos is the big draw here. This stand has a huge line early on as well. Directly across the walkway from Chronic Tacos is the Coors Light Hangout, which is essentially a sports bar in the stadium. There are tons of TVs and draughts for fans to sit down and enjoy some other sports before the Angels game gets underway.

For something unique, you may want to check out the "Big Cheese" stand located behind section 210. Here they offer specialty grilled cheese sandwiches, where you can add things like short ribs and other meats into your grilled cheese. A regular grilled cheese costs $7, and the short rib version is the most expensive at $12.

The popular pizza is Oggi's Pizza, which is a Southern California chain, and is the only pizza served in Angel Stadium. One thing about Oggi's is that if the Angels win, make sure to go to angels.com/oggis to print out a coupon for free Oggi's Stix.

At the regular concession stands, Angel Dogs cost $4.50, and so do medium-sized Pepsi products. You can also get the typical peanuts, popcorn, Cracker Jack and pretzels, all for anywhere from $4-$7.

The big thing now is the helmet nachos. For $17, you get a huge order of nachos served inside of an Angels batting helmet. These are available at the Nacho Daddy stands, which are found on all of the various concourse levels of the stadium. And you'll see all the people coming away with helmets full of nachos. They're not hard to spot.

Atmosphere    5

I don't know a lot of places that have a better feel for baseball than Angel Stadium. In typical Southern California fashion, there's some traffic trying to get to the stadium. But once inside, everything is laid back, very spacious, and there's a lot of great views to add that extra little something.

The Angels atmosphere really starts while you're still in your car driving to the game. Along the 57 highway is the famous "Big A." If the Angels win that night, the big halo on the Big A will light up, which is always a good thing to see in Anaheim. You'll also want to turn on KLAA AM 830. Roger Lodge, who I remember from Blind Date, hosts an Angels-specific pregame show and gives decent insight into the Halos.

The best gate to enter the stadium is the Home Plate Gate, which is clearly marked by two enormous baseball hats. When entering through this gate, you get access to the main team shop. The 2002 World Series Trophy is encased here, as well as a lot of murals on the walls celebrating the history of the Angels and the stadium they've almost always called home.

The most recognizable feature in the stadium is the California Spectacular in left-center field. If anything, it's more of a remnant of the Disney times. It also serves as the backdrop to private parties that are held right behind it along the outfield concourse before games.

The Angels dugout is along the third base side, with the visitors sitting in the first base dugout. One somewhat unique feature to Angel Stadium is the double-decker bullpens in left field. Both bullpens are beyond the left field wall, with the Angels' bullpen being the one farther away from the left field fence. Sort of unorthodox, and pitching changes take that much longer because of all the stairs both teams have to take to finally make it down to the warning track.

Right before first pitch, several videos are played on the various video boards commemorating the bright history of the franchise. All the no-hitters, all the cycles, the 2002 World Series, the MVPs, and the Cy Young winners. They're all remembered during the videos, which are set to Train's "Calling All Angels," which obviously makes sense.

And then there's the Rally Monkey. If the Angels are trailing in the seventh inning or later, the famous Rally Monkey makes his appearance. The Angels do a really good job of keeping it current, putting the Rally Monkey in some movie clip to make his entrance to "Down with the Sickness." The video boards all put up the words "If you make noise, he will come." And then "Jump Around" starts playing as the cute little monkey starts jumping up and down on the screen. Most outsiders hate it, but as an Angel fan, the Rally Monkey was an integral part of that 2002 World Series run, and should never go away.

As for the seating, everything is fairly comfortable and there is plenty of legroom, even in the upper deck. Right behind home plate is the Diamond Club, which is sort of unique as regular fans can't see the field from the concourse. And then of course there are plenty of suites for those that are so inclined to pony up the money for them.

Neighborhood    3

Anaheim isn't exactly a place where you just walk around the neighborhood before or after the game. Either way you're driving or getting on the train, which hurts the neighborhood score a little bit.

Right across the 57 is Honda Center, home of the Anaheim Ducks. On nights that the Angels and Ducks happen to be playing at the same time, that can really screw up traffic on the 57 as well as on I-5. Luckily it doesn't happen often, but when it does, it causes some serious issues.

The most famous thing about the area around Angel Stadium is of course Disneyland. The park is just a couple miles west on Katella Ave, but beware that in 2014, there is a significant amount of construction going on along Katella.

Having Disneyland so close certainly helps the hotel situation for visiting baseball fans. Any hotel chain you can think of can be found on either Katella or Harbor Boulevard.

The Anaheim Gardenwalk is probably your best bet for entertainment and dining before and after games. Here you'll find a Bubba Gump Shrimp Co, a Cheesecake Factory, a movie theater, a bowling alley, and plenty of shops. It's not too far from the stadium, located just west of I-5 on Katella.

Just northwest of the stadium is The Catch, which is a more upscale sports bar, but does have a reasonable game day menu. Another good choice is JT Schmid's.

Fans    4

Staying with the typical Southern California feel, Angel fans are very welcoming and laid back, but definitely know when it's the right moment to get into the game. Outside of the Rally Monkey, there are moments during a game where you expect the fans to get into it, and the Anaheim faithful can certainly fill those moments with noise. Unlike Dodger games, visiting fans should feel safe wearing their gear to Angel Stadium, as these fans are much more welcoming.

The one special section of fans is the Trout Farm, which is section 101. Everyone who sits there gets a commemorative Trout Farm t-shirt.

Access    4

Angel Stadium is located almost at the intersection of the 57 and 5 freeways, which makes it a bit easier to get to than you might expect for a Southern California venue. Traffic is not typically as bad in Anaheim as some other parts of the area.

When driving on either of those freeways, you'll want to get off at either Orangewood or Katella; there is some roadwork going on along Katella during 2014. General parking costs just $10 ($20 for VIP parking).

Another option to get to the game is on the Amtrak Pacific Surfliner or Metrolink. The Anaheim station is currently found on the outskirts of the parking lot, making driving to the game unnecessary for those fans that live farther away but still in Southern California. There is a new train station being built on the other side of the 57 which will serve both Angel Stadium and Honda Center out of the same location.

There are four different levels at Angel Stadium, which splits up the foot traffic very effectively. Concession and bathroom lines don't spill out into the concourse, keeping the walkway nice and clear for essentially the entire game. Even exiting at the end of the game isn't too difficult as there are tons of ramps and escalators leading to all of the different levels, giving people plenty of options.

Return on Investment    4

The one real issue with value at Angel Stadium is the food prices, but for being in Southern California and being a Major League stadium, the food is fairly reasonable by comparison.

Parking is only $10, and tickets can be found for as low as $11, and you can get pretty good tickets on the lower level for around $40. There is something for everyone of any age to do and appreciate at the stadium as well, so it's a great place to go for a family outing, or just hang out for the night and watch some ball.

There are some ticket specials that you can take advantage of right here.

Extras    5

There's a lot of extra that goes into an Angel game.

Right when you enter the stadium at the 100 level, you'll notice all of the history that is commemorated on the walls. Along the wall of the main team shop is the 2002 World Series Trophy. And as you continue walking both on the 100 level and 200 level you'll see the former Angel greats honored in the Angels Hall of Fame.

On the wall of the upper walkway in right field are the Angels retired numbers (Gene Autry, Jackie Robinson, Rod Carew, Nolan Ryan and others). It's kind of a secluded place in the ballpark as far as foot traffic goes, but you'll definitely notice them no matter where you're sitting. On the 200 level in right field is an area meant for kids, including an arcade and a radar gun.

The left field area is full of interesting things. Besides the California Spectacular, there are many flags honoring the division championships, American League Championships, and of course the 2002 World Series Championship. If the wind is blowing just right, it's cool to see all those pennants blowing in the wind next to the rocky landscape of the California Spectacular. It's certainly something you can't get at any other ballpark.

Now out in left field is the Albert Pujols home run tracker, which will apparently keep track of Pujols' career home runs until the day he retires.

In the food court area by gates one and two is a statue of Gene Autry, the original owner of the Angels. If you're into the history of the game, it's worth it to go out there and visit the statue for a short while. There's a lot of info carved into the area around it, giving all the background info that a baseball fan would want to know.

On the 100 level along the third base line are two unique shops right next to each other. There is an Oakley Store, which is so SoCal. But then there is Angels Authentics, which is a collection of unique memorabilia. Even though most fans probably aren't looking to buy a piece of art for hundreds or thousands of dollars at a baseball game, it's still a cool place to check out and see what they have to offer. I happened to visit during Derek Jeter's last series in Anaheim, so naturally there were a lot of Yankees things. But there are also tons of Mike Trout, Pujols, and other players autographed and game-used things to buy.

And then of course, there's the giant hats and The Big A. How many ballparks have so many defining features? I think that's what makes Angel Stadium so special. It is able to stand the test of time and remain unique with all of the little things that make it a great place to see some baseball.

Final Thoughts

Somehow this place manages to take all the best parts of Southern California and combine them into one great experience. Even with Disney not as part of the ownership, you still get the Disney feel with the California Spectacular, and the Disneyland fireworks that you can see off in the distance if you're sitting on the first base side.

Even though they may be known as the "Los Angeles Angels," there is nothing L.A. about the experience. It's all Orange County, and it's a must-do for any traveler heading to Southern California. All these years later, Angel Stadium has stood the test of time, and continues to do so.

When getting to the stadium, there is always plenty of parking. Even showing up only 45 minutes bef

When getting to the stadium, there is always plenty of parking. Even showing up only 45 minutes before a game you usually won't have any problem getting into the lots. But once you get there you will have to look at the ugliest giant red helmets behind the home plate area. I have no idea what the purpose is supposed to be other than a New Era hat advertisement. They need to be torn down.
Inside there are the normal food vendors, plus chinese. I have never seen any beer vendors going through the crowd like I am used to at Wrigley or even spring training games.
The main Pro is the price of tickets. There must be a ton of season ticket holders boosting up their numbers because the place is usually at least half empty. On stubhub you can usually find seats for under $10. Under $2 when they are out of the playoff race.

by Scottie84 | Oct 15, 2010 05:22 AM

Love the links to how the stadium looked in previous years

Nice job.

by megminard | Sep 06, 2012 10:50 PM

photo

The cover photo when you click on the link looks worlds better than the one on the front page. The Honda Center, home of the Anaheim Ducks, really stands out in the background

by DrewCieszynski | Jun 21, 2013 06:13 PM

Sorry to add....

Sorry, but my wife and I, seniors as we are, were put off to no end by the constant commercials: LOUD and flashing on every scoreboard and on that idiotic band of moving lights surrounding the field (which concept seems to be spreading across baseball). I felt like I was in a giant pinball machine, with a baseball game going on over to the side.

by doggierover | Oct 16, 2013 03:33 PM

Came out from MN....

And absolutely loved this park! To begin, I totally disagree with the comment about the constant commercials, it being super loud and constant flashing. Either I was at a quiet game, they changed that stuff or I was even more tired than I thought I was. I did notice these things at time, but not in any more excess than I've seen at any other game I've been to. This could be also tied to having a lacrosse team in MN that is basically a dance, during a lacrosse game, so I may be immune to anything less than that amount of annoyingness....

Anyways, here were my takeaways...
1. The 1st thing I loved was the fast food options in the stadium. I loved the choice of Jack in the Box (which we don't have in Minnesota, but have had in the past and love) and Panda Express. I didn't eat at either on this night, but I always love when a stadium has the option.
2. I loved the views of the mountains in the distance and the Honda Center across the freeway. Very nice.
3. I loved the California Extravaganza (I think that's what they called it). That was probably my favorite feature. I am a sucker for any kind of cool waterfall, fountain, pool, etc. in the outfield, especially when seats out in those areas would rarely be filled, or not be profitable. Unfortunately, the stadiums/arenas in Minnesota are very dull and pride themselves on being "retro" and crap like that. So, since I know MN teams will never do that kind of thing, it's usually a favorite feature of mine.
4. The parking lot surrounding the stadium and easy freeway access was excellent as well! Again none of that in Minnesota, because we "need" all our stadiums in the middle of downtown Minneapolis.
5. The pyrotechnics! I'm a pyro freak, whether lighting myself or watching, I love fire and fireworks. I love fireworks at sporting events/games and besides the Vikings, none of the MN teams do those as well, so that was also a big plus for me.

The 2 complaints I had are...
1. The steps (at least in the upper level) were very very small. My mom (who has small feet) and I both had trouble not falling down the steps going to the concourse.
2. Although, the nachos I got weren't even the most expensive ones and they were still huge and made to order. I was disappointed that, like most stadiums and arenas now, the beef was shredded beef and even had big chunks of onions mixed in. A small complaint from a slightly picky eater, though.

Otherwise I liked this stadium a lot. Would def go back.

by MNGator13 | Jul 27, 2014 07:33 PM

You must be a Stadium Journey member to post a comment.

Already a member? Sign in or Create a Stadium Journey Account

-- OR --

Crowd Reviews

Calling All Angels

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

With its proximity to downtown Los Angeles and rich baseball history, Dodger Stadium seems to be the venue that most sports fans reminisce about when discussing LA sports stadiums.

Of course, such fans would be close-minded to not mention the allure of Angel Stadium of Anaheim. Since 1966, this venue has been making its mark on Los Angeles-based sports. Few stadiums have been able to adapt so drastically over the years to meet the ever-changing needs of sports fans.

Believe it or not, when Gene Autry founded the team, they called Wrigley Field their home for the 1961 season. No, not the more familiar Wrigley Field in Chicago, but rather the Los Angeles version named for the same owner. As this venue became unsuitable for MLB baseball, due to a ridiculous power alley which averaged three home runs per game, the Angels would share Chavez Ravine with the Los Angeles Dodgers from 1962 to 1965. In 1964, construction on a stadium in Anaheim began and would cost approximately $24 million. In 1966, the Angels were ready to invite approximately 43,200 fans and call it home. Upon opening its gates, it would be referred to as Anaheim Stadium and eventually nicknamed "The Big A."

Unfortunately for many baseball fans, the Los Angeles Rams began to share the stadium in 1980. The demand for additional seating would cause the stadium to become enclosed to accommodate an additional 23,000 seats. Now with a capacity of roughly 65,000, it was unfortunate that this would block the beautiful views of the San Gabriel Mountains and Route 57. The stadium now seemed very different as it appeared like this.

In 1997, the baseball gods would look down upon Anaheim once again and declare that the stadium would be re-opened. Approximately $100 million in renovations would give the Angel fans a true ballpark once again. The new look would make its debut on April 1, 1998. This new layout would offer 5,075 club seats, 68 club level suites, and dugout level suites.

The Stadium of Angels

Total Score: 3.43

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 3
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 2

The number 3 plays a significant role when it comes to the Angels and where they are in their history.

Opened April 9, 1966, Angel Stadium of Anaheim is in its third incarnation. Originally named Anaheim Stadium (and commonly referred to as "The Big A"), the facility was enclosed to accommodate the Los Angeles Rams football team for the 1980 season. When the Rams were moved to St. Louis, the stadium was again converted to a baseball-only structure, and given the name of Edison International Field of Anaheim. After six seasons, the name was changed again to its current title, Angel Stadium of Anaheim.

Three different owners have operated the Angel franchise, founder Gene Autry, The Walt Disney Company, and current owner Artie Moreno. Finally, the Angels are set to host their third All-Star Game in 2010, after previously holding the event in 1967 and 1989.

The Angels have won one World Series, the only one they have appeared in, against the San Francisco Giants in 2002. Seven times they have won the AL Western Division title and have claimed the Wild Card once.

Halo Baseball

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

While Angels are often known as intermediaries between heaven and earth, Angel Stadium has been an intermediary between Southern California fans and the game of baseball. There has been no shortness of “baseball miracles” here, including three All-Star games, a World Series Championship, no-hitters, a 500th home run, and a 3,000th hit.

While Dodger Stadium may receive more fanfare, Angel Stadium certainly deserves to be mentioned among baseball’s great venues. Since 1966, this venue has been a key part of Los Angeles-based sports, providing memorable events and the setting for many Hollywood pictures. Few stadiums have been able to adapt so drastically over the years to meet the ever-changing needs of sports fans.

Believe it or not, when Gene Autry originally founded the team, Wrigley Field was the first home of the Angels during the 1961 season. Not the world-famous Wrigley Field in Chicago, but rather the Los Angeles version named for the same William Wrigley Jr. This venue was quickly deemed unsuitable for MLB baseball due to a ridiculous power alley which averaged three home runs per game. The solution would have the Angels sharing Chavez Ravine with the Los Angeles Dodgers from 1962 to 1965. In 1964, construction on a stadium in Anaheim began and would cost approximately $24 million. In 1966, the Angels were ready to invite approximately 43,200 fans and call it home. Upon opening its gates, it would be referred to as Anaheim Stadium and eventually nicknamed “The Big A.”

Unfortunately for many baseball fans, the Los Angeles Rams began to share the stadium in 1980. The demand for additional seating would cause the stadium to become enclosed to accommodate an additional 23,000 seats. Now with a capacity of roughly 65,000, the additional seating would come at a cost in that it would block the beautiful views of the San Gabriel Mountains and Route 57. The stadium now seemed very different as it appeared like this.

In 1997, the baseball gods would look down upon Anaheim once again and declare that the stadium would be re-opened. Approximately $100 million in renovations would give the Angel fans a true ballpark once again. The new look would make its debut on April 1, 1998. This new layout would offer 5,075 club seats, 68 club level suites, and dugout level suites.

a gem in anaheim

Total Score: 4.57

  • Food & Beverage: 5
  • Atmosphere 5
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 5
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

This was the last stadium on our west coast stadium tour. Diamondbacks,Padres and Dodgers were our first three. I would have to say this was probably the best one. The atmosphere of Angels fans was great. They were playing the first game against the Giants that they have played since the world series. and it was a mixed crowd of giants and angels fans.
Unfortunately we got there late. as we were in Disneyland for most of the day. Disneyland is super close to the stadium by the way.

Halo Heaven

Total Score: 4.00

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 3
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 4
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 5

In today’s professional sports world, many cities build brand new stadiums, leaving memories of the franchise past in literal rubble. Angel Stadium is one of the few however, that has been successful in incorporating its past with modern amenities for nearly 50 years. While many venues, including its Southern California neighbor PETCO Park, are still clamoring for a first All-Star game, this iconic venue has already hosted three. The stadium’s bucket list is certainly shrinking as it has already hosted a deciding World Series Championship game, no-hitters, a 500th home run, and a 3,000th hit.

Believe it or not, when Gene Autry originally founded the team, Wrigley Field was the first home of the Angels during the 1961 season. Not the world-famous Wrigley Field in Chicago, but rather the Los Angeles version named for the same William Wrigley Jr. This venue was quickly deemed unsuitable for MLB baseball due to a ridiculous power alley that averaged three home runs per game. The solution would have the Angels sharing Chavez Ravine with the Los Angeles Dodgers from 1962 to 1965. In 1964, construction on a stadium in Anaheim began and would carry a final cost of approximately $24 million. In 1966, the Angels were ready to invite approximately 43,200 fans and call it home. Upon opening its gates, it would be referred to as Anaheim Stadium and eventually nicknamed “The Big A.”

Unfortunately for many baseball fans, the NFL’s Los Angeles Rams began to share the stadium in 1980. The demand for additional seating would call for the stadium to become enclosed to accommodate an additional 23,000 seats. While the seating capacity was now at roughly 65,000, it would come at a tremendous cost in that it would block the beautiful views of the San Gabriel Mountains and Route 57. The stadium had unfortunately joined the growing multi-purpose stadium movement.

In 1995, the Rams left for St. Louis and in 1997 baseball gods would look down upon Anaheim once again and declare that the stadium would be re-opened. Approximately $100 million in renovations would give the Angel fans a true ballpark once again. The new look would make its debut on April 1, 1998.

Very Nice...

Total Score: 4.14

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 4
  • Neighborhood: 4
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 4
  • Extras: 4

Angel Stadium benefits from being located in a beautiful part of the world. Every time I’m in SoCal I try to catch an afternoon game at Angel Stadium. The fans may not be quite as boisterous as at some other stadiums but on the whole it’s a great stadium and a wholly enjoyable experience.

Nice

Total Score: 3.43

  • Food & Beverage: 4
  • Atmosphere 3
  • Neighborhood: 2
  • Fans: 4
  • Access: 5
  • RoI: 3
  • Extras: 3

I like Angels Stadium, but it is one of the places I won't drive 2 hours to go see a game unless it was marquee. I could tell it was a multi purpose stadium that was converted, I like the changes, the fans were fun and since it was Opening Day there was lots of interesting happening.

Share your thoughts about Angel Stadium of Anaheim

Local Food & Drink

The Catch  (map it!)

2100 E Katella Ave

Anaheim, CA 92806

(714) 935-0101

http://www.catchanaheim.com/

OC Sports Grill  (map it!)

450 N State College Blvd

Orange, CA 92868

(714) 935-0300

http://www.ocsportsgrill.com/

J.T. Schmid's  (map it!)

2610 E. Katella Avenue

Anaheim, CA 92806

(714) 634-9200

http://jtschmidsrestaurants.com/

Local Entertainment

Disneyland  (map it!)

1313 S Disneyland Dr

Anaheim, CA 92802

(714) 781-4000

http://disneyland.disney.go.com

The Grove of Anaheim  (map it!)

2200 E. Katella Avenue

Anaheim, CA 92806

(714) 712-2700

http://www.grove-of-anaheim.com

Anaheim Gardenwalk  (map it!)

321 W Katella Ave

Anaheim, CA 92802

(714) 635-7410

http://www.anaheimgardenwalk.com/

Lodging

Ayres Hotel Anaheim  (map it!)

2550 E. Katella Avenue

Anaheim, CA 92806

(800) 595-5692

http://www.ayreshotels.com/anaheim

w

© 2014 Stadium Journey